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Poised to Make History, New York on Cusp of Tuition-Free College


#1

Poised to Make History, New York on Cusp of Tuition-Free College

Andrea Germanos, staff writer

New York is on the verge of becoming the first state in the nation to offer tuition-free state and city colleges for low- and middle-income students.


#2

I wonder if the author of this story is aware of the 8 NYS Senate Democrats who vote with the Republicans. They call themselves the Independent Democratic Conference and their leader even caucuses with the Republicans. While there is supposedly a Republican majority of one, it is actually nine, so if this budget passes, it will be because the Governor and his henchmen strong armed them. I am all for public higher education and for NYS single payer, but don't hold out much hope for either to pass.


#3

What about California before Ronald Reagan? Didn't they offer free college?


#4

Yes - tuition was zero in California before Reagan - except for incidental fees of $84 per year and working over the summer at a minimum wage job was enough to pay for most of your dorm fees.


#5

No one in their right mind would invest in Cuomo. Manhattan and Wall Street money floats his boat. Didn't carry a single upstate county when primaried last out. He's done nothing for the state while in office. Tried to ram fracking through but the people crushed that effort, and fast. So it's doubtful he has the political swat to get any pet legislation through the NYS government. He's merely positioning himself to run for president in 2020. By taking populist positions advanced by Sanders, whether they are enacted or not, he creates an anti-establishment ethos for himself as a base to launch his campaign. He's got about as much chance of getting the nomination as I do, but his very early effort shows how open and how nasty the fight for 2020 will be.


#6

glad to see that my hometown is getting back to where it was once upon a time when I went to college in the 50's basically tuition free as did my 3 siblings. we all went on to attain several graduate degrees as well and more than repaid in taxes to local, state and national government all that was invested in us. that's the idea. you want a state and country that works for all, then support all its residents!


#7

Hello Shandaken, That scum Cuomo has done for himself at the expense of the people of NY. I would give the same advise that sups with the Devil. Have a very, very long wooden spoon! The machinations of the Hamlet on the Hudson are too numerous to mention in a comment such as this. He is the antithesis of his father! Just another Right wing radical Rethug masquerading as a Democratic Party elite!


#8

I don't think this will be a game changer because fees and room and board constitute by far most of the costs. For example, at Binghamton U the in-state tuition is $6,470, the fees are $2,940, and room and board is $14,577. So tuition is only 27% of the cost. Students will need still to come up with $17,517 a year or over four years about $70,000. Clearly many students will still have to borrow. The plan certainly doesn't solve the cost problem of college but it helps. Of course commuting students do not have to pay room and board and therefore this plan will particularly helpful for these type of students.


#9

you knew there had to be a trick if Cuomo was involved.
And sure enough, the work/live requirement is going to sink a ton of that "free tuition" into loans. This might actually make things worse, because it's going to attract a lot of people to go to school without thinking about the constraints of the NY job market.

This bill is bait to get more kids to go to college since enrollment has been decreasing as people slowly figure out that going to college for most people is at this time a very unwise decision.


#10

"While eliminating tuition expenses, students will still need to pay fees and room and board charges, leaving potentially significant charges.": As someone who attended several NYC and NY State colleges long ago, there was NO tuition only fees which, of course, for impoverished students was still unaffordable but one could apply for a partial scholarship. Books were not as prohibitive as they are now. Decades later, I enrolled in a State College and had to pay tuition. So what changed? Greed I would think, the idea that people are not citizens of a society but consumers of a company town. When I wanted to go to MED School the tuition closed that door. ALL education should be free--publicly funded tuition--and not based on anyone's income. Society needs to take the view that healthy and educated students are an asset to society. Also, students should not be expected to hold down jobs but to place all their efforts into studying. This is how we repay society at large.


#11

How true!


#12

NY was also free.


#13

Word on the street is has it that he is a proponent of "reefer madness" also....
What a treat for all of those incarcerated minority kids, languishing away in confinement, that could well use an education...


#14

Well selected and spoken words Giovanna...


#15

Great. I hope these students won't get radiation poisoning though...:

Direct Online Democracy


#16

http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/forum/2011/10/12/when-tuition-at-cuny-was-free-sort-of/

Most important part:

"Merit-based free tuition survived through much of the last century until 1970, when the University dropped all tuition charges and accepted any student with a high school diploma. The move ushered in a brief period of free tuition for all undergraduate students that would not survive the economic realities at the time."


#17

California's pioneering tuition-free college program was a factor in Silicon Valley's job explosion. Silicon Valley is centered around California's engineering school, Stanford.

Good luck NY. This is in the smart direction.


#18

B/c when the peons do well, the government does well.


#19

Yeah, such as the need for trillions of dollars for funding endless Empire's wars! Don't fall for the B.S.


#20

Certainly did. Ronald Reagan screwed that to pieces because he wanted to suppress student voices. The suppressor in chief, laid back and genial and massively destructive and hateful.
I guess he did such a good job of destroying a great common good that these youngsters writing these articles have no institutional memory to draw from. Born the decade before yesterday.