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Protesters, True Patriots


#1

Protesters, True Patriots

Pierre Tristam

One of the most noble protests in the history of protest was that of Thick Quand Duc, the Vietnamese Buddhist monk who doused himself in fuel and lit himself on fire on a Saigon Street in 1963 to protest Buddhists’ treatment at the hands of the corrupt American-backed regime, and by extension, to protest American involvement in his country. He never flinched until he collapsed, consumed by the flames. And he started a trend, as other monks followed.


#2

"We surround ourselves with like minded media..."

Our Media has been Captured by just a few Powerful Interests, and now, rather than the three TV Networks Nationwide, that existed until Cable, and the thousands of Independent TV and Radio Stations that existed, until they were vacuumed up by those same Interests, we are given niche Channels, Stations, Newspapers and Periodicals that work to keep us divided, as a People, to serve their Interests, rather than as Tools to Unite us.


#3

Bring back the Youth International Party, (Yippies) to college campuses. mass re-print, "Steal This Book", and flood college campuses with them. Guerrilla radio, and guerrilla television outside college campuses with the works of Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, William Kunstler, Allen Ginsberg and countless other women, men, and teenagers of the Yippies. Performance art flash mob college campuses with Yippie weird, whimsical, provocative, surreal theatre stunts. Please anything to get our college kids, women, and men out of this trance they seem to be in. Maybe another Human-Be In festival to kick it all off! One Nation Under Groove!


#4

I initially found myself repulsed by Tristam's use of the word "trend" in reference to the self-immolation of Vietnamese monk Thick Quand Duc in protest of US imperial 'exceptionalism'. But etymologically it references the flow of a river around a bend. Despite the banal 'trends' of fashion, (itself an interesting word, both verb and noun, meaning to manipulate materials/final product for a decided mass market control of personal identity in order to take monetary resources (the value of a personal life) through fomenting competitive solipsistic feedback loops on dominance over the promise of group identity - all too bizarre when you think about it.

Exceptionalism as a trap is as old as donning armor in a lightning storm under a tall tree in an empty field. Or to illustrate with a simile - At least every other thread, and frequently more, in the fabric of life is dropped, both woop and warf, until the meaning itself of 'fabric' can't even then fit the definition of 'net' - that is, not until every intersection is tied in knots. Note that the former cannot be transformed into the latter, only in the fog of stress and paranoia resulting from the missing integrity in the form of dignity, interconnection and the resilience these create.


#5

O,The strings of nostalgia twang! But to business: Die-In, new protest, every Sat. @ noon for one (1) hour. Practice for extinction! * citizenuntiedblog.wordpress.com — Citizens Un-tied


#6

Am I going to have to break out my 1970's cereal box de-coder ring to de-code your message, or is that twang?


#7

Enough talk about patriotism. Leave it to the war criminals and their cheerleaders. There is an implication of us-vs-them mentality in a word that means supporting OUR country.

We should be proud to say, "to hell with patriotism." There is nothing wrong with hating the U.S.A.


#8

If I wanted to be a real terrorist, I would join an evangelical church; be a flag waver that supports the war mongers; vilify all peacemakers as terrorists and unpatriotic; and wear a flag lapel pin.


#9

Except, that by putting it that way, you're falling into the same trap. It's not about "our country" or "patriotism" or "hating the U.S.A.", it's about hating the particular actions and policies and the abuse of human beings and reckless behavior and -- insert your list of detestable actions here --... I don't hate the USA, I hate the things our government does that it shouldn't, and doesn't that it should.


#10

I love what the U.S A. says it is; but I detest what it truly has become! Murdering brave, albeit misled, American soldiers and innocent people all over the world and lying about the reasons why in my name.


#11

There is a lot to like and a lot to dislike. That is probably true of every country in the world.


#12

I completely agree, shout. It's the only way. Mass bohemia. Mass rejection of the bourgeois paradigm.


#13

The college students of today are not protest/festival minded. They are serious and very conscious of being adults as they say. They would rather spend the weekend studying than having fun with friends, and they have real goals that involve bettering the community , being curious and of course aiming for a real career.
They are not in a trance, and mainly are not interested in drugs.


#14

Who's going to pay their college loans? They are serious and career minded.


#15

I agree with you. At the same time, there are a lot of brave people who save people here and all over the world. We do not hear about them as much.


#16

I agree- it's the action and irresponsibility. Also, when people say government, they act as if the government was a machine- instead it is run by people who install or vote for the members of the government. We DO need to get rid of this electoral college system.


#17

You probably do not hate the USA and the privilege side of it. What you are probably referring to are the actions, wars and inspired hatred called patriotism.


#18

I might not be 100% clear on what you mean by the "privilege side". I do know that a lot of privilege, and wealth in this country, comes at the expense of oppression, mass sickness and death in other countries. If I don't hate it, (and I'm not saying I don't) there certainly are a lot of people who think that is detestable, too.


#19

"Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater, more than it injures the hated." ~Coretta Scott King


#20

Are you for real?