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Putting the Trump Stamp on the Public


#1

Putting the Trump Stamp on the Public

Jim Hightower

D.T. (as aides refer to the present occupant of the Oval Office) is really quite good at one special skill: branding. He has slapped his name on a ridiculous range of consumer merch — teddy bears, steaks, made-in-China ties, vodka, underwear and even a urine test. His nasty policies and behavior steadily turned the brand toxic, as only two merchandisers have kept his name on their products. Still, some two dozen towers, condos, palaces and other glossy real estate edifices blare his name, and 17 global golf meccas proclaim his ostentatious wealth.


#2

I say arm the letter carriers and send them to DC to represent themselves. Quite a lot of them are veterans and will know how to serve their subpoena to Hair Führer.


#3

From the article:

“The problem for these ideologues and corporate predators is that USPS is not only a government agency that works, but a tangible presence in people’s daily lives, so millions of folks see it working for them.”

No doubt that’s true, but there are more mundane reasons for this particular assault: all that real estate in prime downtown locations is just begging to be snapped up for pennies on the dollar; all that rolling stock is waiting to be auctioned off; and don’t forget that employee pension fund, waxing fat under the mandate to cover all estimated costs for 75 years out.

The Post Office—a piñata that keeps on giving.


#4

Great institution, the U.S. Postal Service! I still pay my bills through the mail, even though the utilities would all love for us to pay online automatically. But there is this one suggestion I have for the USPS I have always wanted to communicate: They should set up a system, whereby if someone wants to order something from a catalog, say, but they don’t want to get put on their list and start receiving endless junk mail as a result (well their latest catalog at least), there should be some way I can get a randomly-generated postal code/address that the local post office would keep track of as to who this postal code/address is currently assigned to. Then after the item you ordered is delivered to you, the postal address you were assigned for this purchase would be effectively destroyed, so in that way the company who you purchased said item from would no longer be able to locate you. I think this feature of the U.S. Postal Service would be very popular!

And another great thing about corresponding via the mail, is you don’t have to worry about your communications being monitored …


#5

Funny how you never hear conservatives say “government is inherently incompetent, wasteful and “the problem” — a social evil that is to be hated and, piece by piece, eliminated” in regards to the Dept of Defense who hasn’t passed a financial audit in who knows how long and doesn’t even know where all those billions went to.

D.T. - otherwise known as Delerium Tremens. Good one.


#6

The real truth is that conservatives only want to privatize essential gov’t services that they think they can make a fast buck on because those conservatives are corrupt and greedy. They are just spouting lies in order to force us to make them rich. A cornered market is not a fair market. Fire Departments used to be private for-profit entities. That didn’t work out. Now, Fire Depts are gov’t run. Read your history and be armed against conservative lies.

In my opinion, a cornered market needs to be democratized.


#7

Jim forgot to also mention that the USPS does provides vastly better service, with far fewer screw- ups and lost and damaged shipments - and at a lower cost than their freedom and free-market-based competition, the UPS and the absolutely awful FedEx.


#8

I find myself settling into a state of Zen deflection of and from the feeding frenzy barrage of tipsters, banksters, gangsters and trumpsters. Perhaps there is wisdom in the notion of there being times to recognize when the most efficient thing to do is duck and get out of the way. Then side glances rev up an inclination to engage verbal jujitsu. Unfortunately, not yet having fully transcended frustrations, the blitherings generate deep sighs and a return to research and increasingly long walks. Nothing like a few miles at 10 degrees to sharpen resolve.
Funny, I always associate something nearly angelic with the USPS. Its HUMAN communications - despite the crap junk mail. But even that contributes revenue and paper that, with a bit of wallpaper paste, can become a sculpting medium.
Let the numbskull parasites slap a label stamp on the building. But if they screw anymore with the USPS itself, I dare say the last go-round sharpened the last generation of truly appreciative public participants in a nearly universal (Earth-wise) institution.
It doesn’t have the greed element that the military presents, yet there is unparalleled institutional infrastructure and character that is deserving of literature. Fortunately there have been some good sound artistic efforts - we could sure use some more.
Happy hectic holidays USPS!


#9

And another great thing about corresponding via the mail, is you don’t have to worry about your communications being monitored …

From Wikipedia:
Mail Isolation Control and Tracking (MICT) is an imaging system employed by the United States Postal Service (USPS) that takes photographs of the exterior of every piece of mail that is processed in the United States.
Type “Post Office photographing mail” into your favorite search engine for lots more.

Someone told me that the USPS is working on three additional projects:

  1. Ultraminiaturized ground-penetrating radar that can read your messages inside the envelope through as many as 17 sheets of paper. It recognizes the difference in atomic weight between blank paper and paper with ink or pencil marks.
  2. Genetically modified bats, each literate in English and at least one other language, who can use their echolocation abilities to read your message through the envelope.
  3. Ants equipped with itty-bitty steno pads and pencils who will copy your messages. This is the low-tech option.

#10

Geez, I knew there was no sane reason for that crazy insurance prefunding retirements out beyond people who are not even hired yet. But if the plan all along was to raid it then it makes sense I suppose. But that is fiendish.


#11

Newt Gingrich special.


#12

We’re going to have to invent some new superlatives. What’s a nice short way to say “consistently, copiously, gleefully and gratuitously fiendish?”


#13

No. Paul Wellstone special. Newt Gingrich crap.


#14

It’s 21 trillion of no oversight.


#15

American?


#16

Should also mention the the Postal Act of 1792, which created the modern Post Office stipulated no opening the mail (no surveillance) (mostly followed) and what we now think of as Net Neutrality, that all items were shipped equally. No non deliveries or refusal to handle someone’s mail because they are a competitor, etc. No charging more because of who you are for the same size mail or package.
That postal act of 1792 also stipulated allowed for post offices to be opened in any territory anywhere (great use of pork barrel) by congress critters and that they did not have to show a particular level of profit (something which held back other countries postal development at that time). They still operated in the black.
The act also allowed for free transfer of newspapers anywhere, leading to something like what we saw with blogs were information was distributed and reprinted, so much so that when Toqueville visited here he said that even the most backwoods folks new more about European affairs than most Europeans.
And, for at least the first 40 or 50 years post offices were the most visible federal presence in any state, eventually leading to a sense of moving from THESE United States to THE United States.


#17

Now, if you wanted to actually IMPROVE the USPS, you would make the next buy of local delivery vehicles be hybrids, even plug-in hybrids, charging overnight from the solar battery at the PO.
And, add back postal banking, for the sort of simple transactions, check cashing, and small loans missing in many towns, instead of “payday loan” sharks.
That retirement fund would become easy to cover, and the community would be stronger for it all!