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Reducing Inequality in the Trump Era


#1

Reducing Inequality in the Trump Era

Josh Hoxie

In a lot of ways, 2016 was a big year for reducing inequality.

Five states raised their minimum wage through citizen-led ballot initiatives. A job-killing free trade agreement, the TPP, was blocked as a result of massive public demonstrations against it.

More recently, the city of Portland, Oregon passed the first ever municipal-level check on runaway CEO compensation, a tangible step several other cities and states will likely follow.


#2

American Exceptionalism.


#3

How about taxing the one percent to pay for sharp increases in the Earned Income Tax Credit?

Bill Clinton raised the EITC in 1993, lifting millions out of poverty.


#4

"There are no illusions of change coming from Washington DC", nor have there ever been when you consider that most change initiated in DC is oppressive and regressive, whereas most progressive change is initiated in states and spreads to the extent that it becomes national.


#5

You are absolutely correct in what you say about this, up to now. Unfortunately, we are already
beginning to see, in states with gerrymandered Republican-dominated legislatures, a strategy of
simply passing laws overriding progressive statutes by their cities. Example: The city of Charlotte's
attempt to exempt their city from the NC "bathroom bill". Many of these Republican-controlled state
legislatures tend to sing from the same ALEC hymnbook.


#6

One thing that hasn't changed is that liberals see the gap between the working class and rich, yet are weirdly oblivious to the canyon between the poor and middle class.

I've wondered if our more fortunate can even grasp the fact that not everyone is able to work, and there simply aren't jobs for all. We lost a huge number of jobs since the 1980s, ended actual welfare aid in the 1990s, and pretend there are no consequences. What we have today is a huge surplus of job-ready people who are desperate for any job at any wage -- grateful for the chance to replace you for less than you are paid. There's nothing to fall back on.

I've yet to see a wisp of concern about the inequality between the poor and middle class.


#7

The poor don't benefit from the EITC. Learn the difference between the poor, and min. wage workers. Our poor today have $0 incomes. The minimum wage, as modest as it is, provides roughly double what our former welfare aid provided. We're stuck with the reality that not everyone is able to work (health, etc.) and there simply aren't jobs for all. The US shipped out a huge share of our jobs since the 1980s, ended actual welfare aid in the 1990s.


#8

How about the 1% with their heads on pikes? Now perhaps THAT would get their attention -- since nothing else seems to work.