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Repubclians Lost Their Way Long Before Trump (But So Did the Democrats)


#1

Repubclians Lost Their Way Long Before Trump (But So Did the Democrats)

John Atcheson

There's been a spate of articles about how Trump has "taken over" the Republican Party. For example, New York Times columnist Charles Blow opened a recent column saying, "In one way, Donald Trump’s presidency has been a raging success: He stole a political party.” And former House Speaker John Bohner said, "There is no Republican Party. There's a Trump party. The Republican Party is kind of taking a nap somewhere."


#2

It does seem that minor differences on social issues are the only things that separate the core of our two privately run political parties.
Democrats have drifted far to the right under the leadership of the Clintons. Most candidates for national offices like House, Senate, and POTUS don’t even mention a woman’s right to choose anymore, or not just saving social security and Medicare, but expanding them. They never sing the praises of public schools or massive infrastructure projects.
most democrats now tell you they support tax cuts. They support de-regulation. They support privatization of public services and commons. They just don’t support them as much as republicans.
Doesn’t that make you misty?


#3

Great analysis and commentary by John Atcheson!

"what little of the press hadn’t been purchased outright by big corporations, neutered itself by a commitment to being “balanced”—as if fact and fiction could somehow be compromised into truth."

The survival of any “democracy” or republic is dependent on a free press and vibrant journalism…our so-called Fourth Estate has indeed been terminated in favor of propaganda and as John writes the BS lie of “telling both sides of an issue”…that is the MO in print and visual media and I won’t even get into the nutter blogosphere…

The rise of the ginger pig and toleration of his tantrum rants via “twitter” (how apropos) makes a mockery of truth and much else, but his mental illness and dedication to chaos, distraction, and distortion of facts (AKA bald-faced lies) in the office of prez is destroying what actually (even if only myth and fantasy - a shadow of reality - you know, “with liberty and justice for all”) made America “great” by some standards.

To Hell in a hand-basket folks, and the “opposition” party is as complicit to the Grand Con as anyone, but their perfidy and betrayals continue to grow and the grip on power and the mechanisms of the party, of the neoliberal, DLC swine is still so strong they cannot be dislodged


#4

For an interesting read on how a lot of this was conceived and unfolded, I recommend Nancy McLean’s Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America (2017).


#5

Giving any credence to either wing of the duopoly by continuing to expect some sort of meaningful shift in their approach to governance is, as Albert Einstein said, the definition of insanity.


#6

The new dark age has begun. Our Republic is dead and is pushing up daisies.


#7

It seems to me that the duopoly have all the cards and make up the rules as the game is being played. We can never beat them playing their game.
The solution has to be on the outside of politics and the conservative vs. liberal ideology that has the American people voluntarily divided and conquered. It’s the biggest reason that a nation full of people with the same dreams, desires and problems, being sh!t on by the same fraction of a percent, view one another as enemies.
IMO the vast majority have the intelligence to see that, no matter which political wing of the government has the power, the conservatives and liberals of the 1% always win and the rest of the conservatives and liberals always lose. Always. It’s beyond rhetoric, it’s reality.
If by some miracle enough people came together to form a movement, what better cudgel could we use to take down the duopoly than the very Constitution they are in violation of? How could they talk their way out of that? Or put it down through violence and intimidation?
We have the power, we just don’t know it yet. If we can’t get our sh!t together, as a nation, to save our Constitution from it’s domestic enemy maybe we don’t deserve the fking thing.


#8

Good cop/Bad cop. There are even progressive voices that say you got to change the Democrat Party from within but I don’t think that is possible. They learn nothing from all their losses and we still have the status quo people running this party.

Much blame can be put on our lamestreet media who are the 1% working for the interest of the 1%. Pretty upside down but most people don’t know what they don’t know. Just watch another football game or basketball and keep cranking out sports heroes.


#9

The problem isn’t that the majority of Americans don’t understand that the system is rigged.

The problem is that they can’t/won’t fight the inertia that keeps it that way.

So, instead of having the courage and imagination to revamp the system completely, they wallow in helplessness and complacency–aided by sheepdogs like Bernie and Liz, who talk a good game about reform while clinging to the status quo like the corporate sock puppets they are.


#10

Nor do they recognize the reality of U.S.-led global imperialism and its profound (negative) effectives on the peoples of the world and the biosphere.


#11

“Ginger Pig” is a good one. Hadn’t seen that before. Kudos.


#12

The guiding principle of the Left is ‘collectivism’. The opposite principle guiding the Right is ‘individualism’. In a democracy, the rule of the majority includes some fair portion of both sides of the political aisle. This is why democrats pull to the center. Republican leaders have no compunction to serve a majority of their own base because their ideal is to serve the most influential individuals, ie, the wealthy and powerful industrialists who are hardly less self-centered than the casino mob boss pig in a wig evil bastard DTrump.


#13

"In one way, Donald Trump’s presidency has been a raging success: He stole a political party.”

Charles Blow gets it. He has probably been writing the best political columns since that fateful day of Nov. 8, 2016 when everything changed. The white nationalists have taken over the Republican Party. The establishment has been outed. For a Republican to take on Trump is pretty much a career ending move. A mindless populist movement is in charge fueled by hatred of non-whites. The Democrats continue to defend all minority groups and the election in 2018 will largely be fought over this difference. Atcheson will of course keep pushing the same old tune since his entire career rests on it. But the world is not going to stay still for John Atcheson. Trump has a party and it is nasty and full of hate.


#14

Dems still don’t understand Ukraine, and that’s the weirdest thing about’em. McCarthyism has jumped over into the wrong party.

Changing from within could be simply a bunch of blokes and blokettes talking to their Dem friends…and/or as many others they come across as possible. As soon as we plan a future we can do it. Everything Koch wants we see right now, so it’s already seen. We need to weave something together out of EF Schumacher type ideas that’ll work. So far, no one sees such a thing…all we’ve got is keep the Fed interest rate low. All these shares about miracle hemp aren’t gonna do it. Lately I’ve been hearing some voices that know the economy. They’d make good Dem candidates; why can’t the Dems see it? (Wallach, Prins, Yves Smith, and maybe/Warren…don’t know if Nancy McClean’s is as hip to econ as this group, but she’s another one anyway…good mention, WiseOwl) Hope they wouldn’t do like Clinton and Kagan/Nuland when it comes to this encircling-Russia-thing . Have a hunch…by now maybe not. Anyway, they’re not stressing we must have a new party…so, what’s the harm in trying to inform Democrats…until the day when we do have one? BTW, Schumacher was broad; we need to learn the fine points from those potential candidates I just mentioned. We need those in taking steps toward what Schumacher was talking about.

Doesn’t bother me going against the majority here. I have to, since, unless I’ve missed it, no one here including Atcheson wants to talk about the interventionist-contingent-of-Dems as a significant turn-off.


#15

Yes, I have been trying to make that same point. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the liberals have been just as much dupes of the divide-and-conquer strategy as those they detest on the other side. They merely use their left knee when knee-jerking to Party. This is what enables the duopoly to maintain control and to prevent any real progress towards democracy, peace, or the public interests.

A progressive left must offer some new leadership that is outside the party lines. It would use the only tools we have left: that of our ability to organize and use economic power. It must rise beyond mere “click democracy” and must go well beyond mass marches. It must strategically use & organize boycotts, labor actions, and more. These could become springboards for the rise of a genuine opposition party.

Such a movement, and any organization(s) that spring therefrom must be eternally vigilant and diligently non-partisan, resisting all attempts to make of it an extension of the Democratic Party, as has seemed to happen to some among the self-proclaimed “Resistance”.

It must be focused on issues, while consciously avoiding falling into the very liberal-vs-conservative labeling & framing that triggers emotional overrides of reason and self-interest.

There are examples of success on a smaller scale for such a vision and strategy. I have been personally involved with some. I believe it’s possible and high time to do this on a broader scale.


#16

No, while I hate to give in to the left-center-right paradigm, if anything, they pull to the right, though they call themselves “centrists” to try to persuade the public that they are with the great middle.

And they do it not out of some desire for fairness, but because their funders don’t like regulations, like American Imperialism and war, wish to continue the concentration of wealth and power and control over all policy. These things have happened under both Republican and Democratic presidencies - even when the President had a majority in Congress.

Clinton had five major achievements as president: NAFTA, the Crime Bill of 1994, welfare reform, the deregulation of banks and telecoms, and the balanced budget. All of them—every single one—were longstanding Republican objectives.


#17

Gotcha Rodger, 10-4. Credit Clinton energy-saving tech and criticize GOP for petroleum consumption, global trade, climate warming denial. What is this denial but another form of warfare? Desperate refugees met with racist target sites! Urban habitat triply decimated under GOP approval and admittedly but perhaps more forgivingly, democrat feigned ignorance and mock ethic outrage. Obama SHOULD lead the world away from Trumpist racist harmful collapse of civil discourse into decrepitude.


#18

John Atcheson’s assertion that the Republican’t Party supports a balanced budget is erroneous. The Party of NO often raises a hew and cry when they are the minority party but are strangely acuessant when a tax cut of 11,000,000,000.000.oo American dollars has been demanded by corporate interests.
It was, however, quite refreshing to have the collusion of the Damnocrats in furthering the Reaganesque policy of Free Trade and Trickle Down economic fantasy in print for we will never see it televised.


#19

When the roof (in this case, the roofs) are rotton, , you’ve simply got to get a new roof. All thinking human and compassionate people need to unite!


#20

Though at least in the sense of football you will likely see the players actually resisting by taking a knee. More meaningful than anything the Democrats have done in the past two years.

Before 2016 and especially the lead up to the 2018 midterms I was one of those who believe the Democratic party can be changed from within. But seeing how they cheated Bernie and the shenanigans they are pulling to continue to keep their status quo I don’t feel they can be changed at all. Or if they can be we will be long dead by climate change before it happens. We desperately need a third and fourth party that will put pressure on the duopoly. Or failing that, a revolution. I hope the former because I can’t see a possible way a revolution can happen without it leading to a lot of deaths.