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Rising Seas on Path to Devastate Coastal US Cities Home to 13 Million


#1


#2

Given the hoopla and denial and lack of media coverage and so forth about this kind of thing, it really seems as though communities moved by rising water would be something that a journalist would want to document.

Does anybody have any idea which communities these are in Louisiana and Alaska, and what sorts of events provoked the moves?


#3

This is already happening in Florida.
Large scale beachfront hotel builds can't get funding or insurance.
Homeowners are suing realtors for not disclosing that their house will be underwater and worthless in 30 years.
Biggest problem, south fla has about 6 million people drinking well water from Everglades replenished wells.
As Everglades flow is receding Ocean flow is advancing thus starting to salt those fresh water wells


#5

Between being the world's sink hole capital, and rising sea levels, I am surprised that Florida is waiting so long to revise zoning laws to allow land owners to park houseboats on their land, instead of building houses, so they can just float when the water rises.


#6

"If we look at something like a managed retreat and a growing population, then the populations we’re going to have to relocate are going to be bigger in the future," Hauer said. "Finding suitable areas for them to move to could be problematic."

There are at least 2 interrelated misconceptions here. First, public use for drinking and household use is only a small part of the water use in Florida or anywhere. Agriculture and industry use and waste far more. And second, moving people is not going to be a problem because the number of people is growing. It's going to be a problem. Like the subtitle said, it's FAR more than 13 million, only it's not growth of population so much as a larger area affected, and yes, it's WAY sooner than 2100.

Population is only growing in the US because of migration, not births. Immigration into the US is mostly caused by war, inequality and the predation of US and other corporations on the poor, especially by agribusiness' GMOs and commodity and meat production. The same factors are causing the huge water use by industrial society and causing climate catastrophe and the larger ecological crisis.


#7

You mistake incompetence for intent. We have damn fools throwing snowballs in the Senate to mock talk about global warming (no snowballs this winter though... No snow either).

Denial is a money maker. Need a campaign donation? Fossil fuel interests have deep pockets. Is that intentional or just corruption? I think they tell themselves that global warming isn't real and then pocket all that money and simply avoid facing facts as long as the money makes that worthwhile.


#8

In a scenario involving a 6ft rise by 2100, a total of 13.1 million
people—more than 6 million of whom would be living in Florida—would be
at risk of catastrophic flooding,

13.1 million USAians would get wet feet if sea-level rose by 6 feet? Hello USA, there are people who do live elsewhere and a lot of them are close to sea-level. Allow me to introduce the country of Bangladesh to the USA. The population in this small area will soon hit 274 million and about half of the country would be flooded if sea-level rose 6 feet. The Yellow River is in China. It runs in dykes perhaps 20 feet above sea level so a rise in sea-level of around 6 feet would porbably see this river backing up and perhaps even bursting its levees. The last time the Yellow River's levees were breached was by the Chinese nationalist army fighting the communists and it cost not a few lives from flooding and consequent starvation. The Yellow River plains are densely populated, but with Chinese. Then the Red River, the river in Vietnam that runs through Hanoi in a country of 80 million people, is approximately at sea-level where it passes through Hanoi, ho hum, but they are only Vietnamese. The Mekong? The Indus? The Ganges? Bangkok is at sea-level and some parts are lower then sea-level. A few million Thais live there. And of course London, a city of around 10 million people many of whom would get wet feet if the sea-level rose 6 feet. Ah, Holland, 11 million people living behind dykes....mmmmmmm......At least the 13.1 million USAian climate refugees pouring out of places like Florida have somewhere to go, like perhaps Colorado, should sea-level rise untowardly. Bangladesh? The next place downwind is West Australia.


#9

The next century is 85 years away, that's a long time during which anything can happen. Some things are definitely not going to happen. The exponential growth of world population cannot continue at its current rate without eventual mass starvation and social collapse. The loss of fresh water sources is accelerating in most of the world and much of that water is becoming contaminated. Florida is a, if not the, major source of fresh fruit and vegetables for the US food markets and a major contributor to world markets as well. Forget West Coast food supplies, the entire southwest is turning into a dust bowl. The melting of the Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets is proceeding at an ever increasing rate. Forget the projecting of the state of the Earth and the plants and animals that occupy it into the next century, we will be experience the change for the worse in the near years and decades. A few years back my brother was thinking of buying a house in Florida and I went over the numbers with him. He loves to sail. I suggested he buy a boat - they go up with the water level. He bought a sailboat.


#10

RichSmith wrote:

'...A few years back my brother was thinking of buying a house in Florida and I went over the numbers with him. He loves to sail. I suggested he buy a boat - they go up with the water level...'

And also, down with the water level.