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Sanders and DNC Level Playing Field for 2020 Presidential Debates


#1

Sanders and DNC Level Playing Field for 2020 Presidential Debates

Steven Rosenfeld

The Democratic Party’s best-known outsider, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, appears to be on the verge of notching yet another inside-track score that doubtless will come in handy when he runs for president in 2020.


#2

I like the idea of mixing up top tier and lower tier candidates. In the Republican primary it was very difficult for candidates in the lower tier debate to ever get to the higher tier debate.


#3

The Progressive Caucus ought to set up their own debate series, and allow the DNC to participate.


#4

Would the MSM cover it? I think they’d run old film clips of Castro, Kruschchev, Stalin and Hugo Chavez giving speeches and interviews. Then, Chuck Todd, Sean Hannity and Don Lemon could ask questions:
Ya’ know, ???s like: How long have you been a Commie, like your comrade-in-arms Sen. Sanders? Are you currently working in a cell to try an overthrow of the U.S. gov’t? How many wealthy, fascist 1%ers would you murder, if elected?
Will you televise the execution of Dick Cheney or the Koch Bros? How about President Trump?


#5

Window dressing at it’s finest, to appear to the public that the DNC will be fair in the future to non-centrist candidates. Until the new rule change is revoked that allows the party leaders to reject anyone they don’t like, the rest is just a dog and pony show. Leaders inside know this, and sadly so does Sanders.


#6

Great!


#7

Where can I read this rule as documented?


#8

Bernie was a guest on the Colbert Show Thursday night. I liked his message and voted for him but tired of his same over and over speech. Well, he’s at it again. Last night, same speech. He had better find ways to change up his presentation or the other candidates will swallow him up on nuance alone. He was out selling his book last night. I guess that was his mission.


#9

Cower in fear–someone might ask questions and portray us as socialists, and always remember:

‘It is what it is.’ And always will be.

Fun fact: Richard Neal’s Massachusetts district has been represented by members of 12 different parties.


#10

Yup. Remember when the Sanders gang “negotiated” seats on all of the committees at the Convention? Every committee was majority Clinton/Superdelagates, so no matter how much progressives cried, they always lost.

Either Sanders and his negotiators are stupid or they are playing cynical window-dressing PR games to sheepdog real progressive rank-and-fliers.

I don’t think they are stupid because the sheep dogging seems to work every time.

Some recent examples from ProgressiveLand:

  1. Failure to focus on the permanent U.S. imperial war against the world and all that implies, while pretending to stand up for the children of Yemen;

  2. A minimum wage of $15 that will be “phased-in” over five years;

  3. "Medicare For All S. 1804 designed to undermine true Single Payer H.R. 676 on the way to turning 676 into 1804;

WoofWoof…TweetOut


#11

And allow ALL parties to be represented!


#12

Having a better debating structure for the Democratic primary battle is welcome. I hope they hold lots of them and I hope the main candidates to emerge at the end will be willing to debate in multiple venues and on more than trivial issues.

But progressives need to look beyond the primaries and set things in motion so that all candidates on the ballot in enough states to win get into the general election debates (Democrat, Green, Libertarian, and Republican). I see one way to make that happen. We need to get an initiative on the ballot in at least one state at the time of a 2019 gubernatorial election or in one of the 2020 primaries that says that a candidate cannot appear on that state’s ballot in the general election unless they agree to take part in a debate in that state that includes all candidates.


#13

True. I have heard from Bernie delegates who have told me the same thing. And from my perspective, until the masses wake up and realize that presidents are selected through a rigged political system, nothing will change in 2020. Joe Biden ( Mr. Master Card ) in 2020?


#14

" Those were the days my friend, we thought they’d never end. We’d sing and dance all night, we’d fight and never lose; for we were young and sure to have our way. La da da da da "
Twelve Parties: Neal’s area has been redistricted just recently. Mapmaking is an art form in politics. Massachusetts is older than dirt with a history of witch trials. And, now Republicans in the South used to be " yellow dog " Democrats.
" It is what it is " reflects Neal’s situation currently, since his district is a regional center for delivering healthcare services. There’s the rub, imo.


#15

Pretty much every district is a hub for delivering healthcare. My wife is a researcher at the UoM med school and health center, which currently employs 22,500 people. My rep, the faux-liberal Debbie Dingell, takes big money from health insurers. But to her credit, she signed on to support HR676.

So you can provide all the cover for Neal you want, but he’s supporting business interests over the majority of his constituents any way you slice it.

‘It is what it is.’ Until people fight to make it something better.


#16

Sanders should have learned by now that anything the democratic party agrees to isn’t worth the paper it’s written on.


#17

If all you do for the Progressive cause is bitch and complain on CD, don’t get down on those who are doing.

Leave Bernie the fuck alone!


#18

Love you, Bernie, but I trust the DNC as far as I can throw Tom Perez.


#19

This is one of my bigger gripes with Sanders. If he had more integrity, he would say, “Look I know I did better with caucus states than primary states, and I know why - a small group of dedicated people can have more influence in a caucus. Nevertheless, it is clear that many people (including working people) don’t have time for a caucus but they do have time to drop a ballot in the mail. So I am putting my voice behind all 50 states moving to primaries and they should all allow mail in ballots. I have quite a few other ideas on improving our primary process and hopefully we can still utilize the spirit in the caucus meetings in other ways, but I am about giving more people more voice, not less and this is the only logical conclusion.”

I’m still voting for him.


#20

I disagree with this. Primaries rely much more on money to compete which is less democratic, not more. My proposal would be to front-load the primary season with just 4 caucuses for different types of states (in terms of rural vs urban, old industry vs new industry, different regions, or whatever makes sense) - then have primaries the rest of the way. I agree that caucuses don’t make sense at the end of the primary season when the main candidates are known, but early on it is important to give interesting voices a way to compete.