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Sanders Highlights American Struggles in Fierce SOTU Response

#1

Sanders Highlights American Struggles in Fierce SOTU Response

Natasha Hakimi Zapata

Beginning his speech by congratulating Stacey Abrams for delivering a strong response to President Trump’s State of the Union address on behalf of the Democratic Party, Bernie Sanders quickly delved into all the things Trump got wrong about the economy, infrastructure, health care, immigration and more in his own response delivered online.

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#2

Power, meet Truth!

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#4

Bernie’s heart is in the right place.

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#5

One of the greatest political speeches in this nation’s history was delivered by FDR in the 1941 SOTU - the “Four Freedoms” speech. To me, its significance is the freedoms FROM:

Freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom FROM want, and freedom FROM fear

There is no “freedom” for the hungry, the anxiety-ridden, the sick with no money, the fearful, or the dispossessed. For all his shortcomings, Sanders is one of the tiny few politicians now that evokes those basic beliefs. The rest serve us up platitudes - cold.

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#6

As a 2016 Sanders primary backer, I agree with all you say (especially as to foreign policy). Sanders is not far enough Left for me, but he IS about as far to the Left as anyone in nationwide politics now. Which is why I get incensed when corporate Dems and the MSM paint him as Looney Tune Left and lecture us as “purists” who need to compromise. Bernie Sanders IS the compromise candidate for us.

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#7

Exactly! Convincing Amazon to give the employees $15.00 an hour wage. How many of the candidates have done that? He got on the soapbox and put on effective debates about Medicare for All. Now, Reuters and Gallup are showing 70% of the nation wants Medicare for All. How many other candidates actually put together such debates, tv specials etc …none as I recall. He came to Florida & met (also walked) with the democratic candidate for Governor and walked with the college students in Tampa and Orlando. He gets it done while the others just talk it and play politician.

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#8

Odd that you do NOT know what a sheepdog does.

Sheepdogs lead back to the same pen that they have been locked into forever. Sen Sanders is leading Americans into new progressive policy. Your Republican sheepdog argument fails!

Odd that you criticize the most “left” politician in the nation… the most popular politician in the nation… the most popular POLICY in the nation. Are your attacks on the left intended to move the public to the left… or to the right?

Sanders is not perfect; but, your attacks against him reveal that you would prefer the right.

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#9

Nobody articulates like Bernie Sanders, nobody has compassion like Bernie Sanders & nobody is ready to be President like Bernie Sanders! Sanders in 2020! Peace

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#10

No longer good enough, Pony. Bernie started the conversation about good policy options that actually solve problems in an era of urgency – but as Tom Johnson points out above, Bernie’s been half-assing it for quite some time now. Seems to me, he’s gunshy after the 2016 situation where he sold his soul to the d-party for a handful of dust, and still got accused of sabotaging Her.

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#12

You should by now. You repeat them ad nauseum every time CD posts an article about Sen. Sanders or any Democrat, including Con. A O-C and Tlaib. So very consistent of you, hmmm…?
Sen. Sanders is not what you frame him as; however, it’s easy to frame you.
You are a windsock who couldn’t tell the difference between Cordray and DeWine in the Ohio contest for governor in 2018. Oh my!

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#13

Identity-politics has not served us well. The first skin-deep black president turned his back on sub-prime black borrowers, and others of color, to embrace Wall Street. The first major party woman presidential nominee rakes in millions from paid speeches to war-profiteers, then avocates war, hardly a nurturing instinct. They both benefited from the identity-politics game, but their centrist neoliberal bent left voters cold, and so, between the two of them, lost the House, the Senate and the White House in 2014 and 2016. Are we prepared to risk another electoral disaster by playng the identity-politics game again?

The utter disaster of four more years of Trump precludes the luxury to consider the ‘cool factor’ - woman, Latino, Asian Indian, black - normally ‘cool’ presidential nomnees all, but a risky move at this life-or-death moment for our republic. This moment calls for a national leader who is: (1) The best known and most popular Democrat, nay, natonal figure, in the country in all polls. (2) The only one with seasoned experience as both chief executive and legislator. (3) The original driver, rather than a late comer hitch-rider, of the band wagon of progressive programs. (4) Energetic, skilled, and articulate, someone who showed us how to wage an effective national campaign. (5) The first and only ever to raise millions from small donations. (6) A hero to a new young generation of involved citizens.

If you can think of a second person who has all these qualifications, please enlighten us. If you can’t, then get behind Bernie Sanders, and work like hell with him to save our country from Trump. We have beaten the centrist Democrats and the billionaires recently; we can do it again.

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#14

I saw Tom’s comments about how Bernie isn’t as progressive as he once was. Bernie would certainly have to answer to those issues before I would seriously consider him for any office.

Once he gave up his “fight all the way to the Democratic Convention” to contest the nomination, and then his endorsement of Her, I had made up my mind at that point, that I could no longer trust him to represent the People before he represented the MIC.

The Democrats broke Bernie Sanders, and I’m afraid he can no longer be fixed.

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#15

It is my understanding that Bernie made clear when he started campaigning that if Hillary won the primary that he would endorse and support her., Plain and simple. That he did. The only problem that Hillary will point out is he didn’t do it fast enough to suit her. Thus, she blames him…as well as everyone else/thing for her loss. I certainly don’t remember
his promise “to contest the nomination” ???

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#16

Only if he had won the California primary would Sen. Sanders contest the nomination. That primary was quite controversial, but he didn’t win.
Just like in New York state, Iowa and Nevada the primaries can be tricky and not transparent enough for new voters/caucus goers.
This needs to be addressed on a national level.

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#17

Thanks for clarifying that point. He needed to win the Calif primary in order to contest the nomination . Got it …

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#18

He said he’d endorse HER early in the game. That was his price of admission to a corrupt process run by a corrupt party. After years of having a front row seat at the d-party kabuki theater, Bernie should’ve known better.

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#19

There were news reports of widespread vote tampering and destruction of ballots in California.

Executed by the Democrats.

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#20

Well, the whole voter registration and party affiliation goes along with your point, though vote tampering and ballot destruction would attach to Kamela Harris, AG at the time.
Did Sen. Harris look the other way? Did she pull another Mnuchin rabbit out of her hat to ensure Hillary’s 7-8% win? I doubt it and that’s a heavy claim to stick on someone. Sen. Harris has plenty of baggage to look into without delving into her hat and fur coat closet. Or, are those Willie’s accoutrements?

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