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Sanders: 'We’re Figuring Out How We Can Mount a National Campaign' for Single Payer


#1

Sanders: 'We’re Figuring Out How We Can Mount a National Campaign' for Single Payer

- Common Dreams staff

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) told Jake Tapper on CNN’s State of the Union Sunday that he will “absolutely” introduce legislation on single-payer healthcare now that the Senate GOP’s bill to repeal ObamaCare has failed.

"If people don't like the private insurance that they're getting, they should have a Medicare-type public option available in every state in this country," Sanders said


#2

The public option might be back on the table after 7 years. That’s just dandy. And what the hell is a “Medicare-like public option” for each state. It seems to me that we’ve been here before.

Now Medicare for all, I can certainly live with that. No change for citizens over 65 and everyone else gets the same.


#4

Health “insurance” companies share values have increased 700% since introduction of ObamaCare.
Get the profiteers (Big Pharma too) out of our healthcare.


#5

This is one bill you can bet the mortgage on that it will not pass and still sleep well at night. In over 30 years Bernie has gotten three pieces of legislation passed and two of them were for renaming post offices. the emphasis should be on stopping a repeal of Obamacare. The Republicans only fell one vote short. I would not be surprised if they tried it again later this year. It is their signature issue. I think they remain determined. Obamacare crossed a red line for Republicans because the government forces many people to buy health care insurance or pay a large tax. This is seen as an infringement on freedom by many Republicans. Too much government for them to accept.


#6

Just as medical professionals follow the mantra “do no harm”, in a duopoly controlled nation, US voters need to judge politicians by how little harm they do. Nearly everything DC politicians have “accomplished” during the past four decades has benefited the 1% at the expense of the 99%. Sanders’ record is one of attempting to prevent harm which has been the best we could hope for since Saint Ron’s revolution and concurrent Democratic Leadership Council (DLC) formation turned K Street into the control center for the nation and much of the rest of the world.

Had Sanders been in the US Congress during the New Deal era (1935-1985) I would concur that his track record sucked. Judging within the context of Saint Ron and his POTUS successors, such criticism is misplaced.


#7

So was Sanders supposed to campaign for Trump?

And when is the family of the late Couterpunch founder Alexander Cockburn going to give his upscale retreat in the redwoods to Habitat - while selling off his collection of huge gas guzzlers. (Cockburn loved his cars so much that he was a global warming denialist - and this quietly continues on Counterpunch today…

Thank-you for delivering my country to the fascists. Counterpunch, and you, can go to hell.


#8

No, he was supposed to have fully campaigned for himself.


#9

Media gave Trump enough free air time to win. Had Counterpunch not existed the outcome would have been the same.


#11

“If people don’t like the private insurance that they’re getting, they should have a Medicare-type public option available in every state in this country,”

Big difference between single-payer and offering something like medicare to people who want it. When ACA was being debated, many people thought public option was the best thing about it, then it was taken out. Are they doing the same thing again? If we’re actually talking about Medicare, as offered now to seniors, being available to everyone, people are still forced to go to profiteers for outpatient services, ER visits, diagnostic, physician visits and all the little things ACA added as essential benefits.

If that’s what Bernie’s aiming for, we can expect insurance companies to jack up prices and deductibles A LOT more than an ACA repeal would, to make up for the loss of the market.


#12

Sanders is trying to figure out the best way forward in a difficult climate. There are a lot of institutional barriers and tough politics to work through regarding single payer. Activists aren’t necessarily focused on these things, but policy people understand them. Transition details are one spot that is particularly problematic. It’s not a snap-your-fingers and a new system exists dynamic, just as it wasn’t with the ACA. And single payer would be far more disruptive than the ACA by miles.

That’s why you’ve got plans like AmeriCare, a proposal from Pete Stark. Vox had a really good article on it. There are other variations of such programs that feature carve outs for entities like Kaiser. What these plans all feature to some degree or another is employer buy-ins to public programs which would keep new taxes low(er) and expand coverage. Worth checking out since I suspect we’ll be hearing more about them in the future.


#13

I’m speculating here, but I think what folks are looking at is some variation of Pete Stark’s old proposal for AmeriCare. I describe it a bit in my comment above. There are numerous reasons for going this route rather than full single payer, though it’d likely get us to a very close place, right or wrong.


#14

Word.

Nothing to add; just like to see fundamental truths repeated as often as is reasonable.


#15

Single-Payer is really, really important. But there are two other issues today that far exceed it in urgency and importance, I don’t see that Bernie Sanders has come anywhere near addressing either of them: 1) the U.S. Congress (both Houses, nearly unanimously) just declared war on Russia; 2) Global Warming is on a pace that will likely result in human extinction. It is as though 9 billion humans are dying of thirst, and Bernie’s solution, thus far, has been to offer each an eye-dropper full of water.


#16

Only Medicare-For-All and getting the market out of healthcare will solve this problem. Someone better hurry up, because Nancy Pelosi is already selling us down the river. She sent a letter to Paul Ryan inviting a ‘bipartisan’ hashing out of a plan that they will no doubt all happily pass because the insurance companies are very worried about the fact that most Americans want the government to provide healthcare as a right. Not to mention that it’s much cheaper to do so!!!


#17

Or did Russia declare war on us? Interfering in an election on behalf of a wreckless idiot–and you and I know Putin knows that’s what Trump is–is pretty antagonizing, wouldn’t you say? Or, are you in the “he just wants peace” camp, or maybe the shrinking “no evidence” head-in-the-sand camp?


#18

Rather for us, as a third party candidate. And hopefully he still will.


#19

Proof please? You’ve been listening to Rachel Maddow too much.


#20

The ACA needs to be put out of its misery. As for Sanders:

Not only has Sanders gotten a lot more things done than Clinton did in her own short legislative career, he’s actually one of the most effective members of Congress, passing bills, both big and small, that have reshaped American policy on key issues like poverty, the environment and health care.


#21

Here’s what Margaret Flowers, physician and Green Party activist has to say about the difference between a public option and Medicare-for-All single payer system. It’s a huge difference. So I hope Sanders isn’t abandoning Medicare-for-All single payer.


#22

Did you read the letter from Pelosi? It’s trolling Republicans telling them Democrats would be happy to work with them on a bill based on the “market stabilization section in the BCRA.” The point is to stabilize exchanges in states with problems and eliminate Trump’s ability to hold funding hostage. Why wouldn’t she do this? She knows Republicans are worried they are going to take the hit if markets collapse under Trump’s antics. It’s politics 101.