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Scientists Warn Crashing Insect Population Puts 'Planet's Ecosystems and Survival of Mankind' at Risk


#1

Scientists Warn Crashing Insect Population Puts 'Planet's Ecosystems and Survival of Mankind' at Risk

Jon Queally, staff writer

The first global scientific review of its kind reaches an ominous conclusion about the state of nature warning that unless humanity drastically and urgently changes its behavior the world's insects could be extinct within a century.


#2

Before industrial agricultural practices emerged pests were often kept at bay by intermingling plants that were known antagonists to the species that threatened the intended crop. Short-sighted profit-seeking forces from financial interests have pressured “farming” practices to extract maximum yields per acre. The result is not only pesticide bombing of crops but also fertilization using copious amounts of fossil fuel to create and apply.

In my work I often had to visit farms to evaluate their water runoff practices. The industrial farms appeared to be moonscapes when not planted. All vegetated matter had been removed and the “soil” was barren. By contrast the organic farms I visited always were inviting and almost always had production in parts of them.

Industry is not smarter than nature and the latter is way more patient. I saw a comedian on a video the other day who was contemplating the planet after humans. His schtick involved the planet thinking “I think I’ll do dinosaurs again”. Couldn’t blame it one bit would be my response.


#3

Just another existential emergency that can be traced back to one central problem, Capitalism.


#4

Yeah. We’re done for.


#5

Nobody cares what Scientists have to say. Nobody cares about Insects… they are Pests and we spray them with poison cause they bite. Nobody cares about serf Humans, we’re just in they way, so they poison us too. Only thing that matters is money and the Rich have it all worked out, dying underground in their multi million dollar Bunkers. The Planet has a good laugh as it replenishes itself while it finally gets rid of the Human Virus.


#6

#7

“with big consequences we don’t really understand.”. (From the article)

I dont suppose the consequences were understood either when the first nuclear detonation was performed. But they still went ahead with it.


#8

I have noticed the absence/decline in recent years of fireflies, grasshoppers and june bugs. i used to walk through a field and startle hundreds of grasshoppers. now, just a few. haven’t seen a june bug in the last several years. they use to appear like clockwork. same for fireflies.


#9

Its the old coyote-over-the-abyss syndrome, only with the exponential factor in full gear.

But hey, you don need a politician to say “read my lips” any more, your smart phone will do that…
LipPass Authenticates Users Based On the Way They Move Their Mouths


#10

a few years ago I read Jared Diamonds book, “Collapse”. every condition of societal and economic collapse is present in the US. It comes down to an unwillingness to adapt the political and economic paradigm to changing conditions such as resource depletion and to practice environmental sustainability. Examples in his book were Easter island, the Mayans, the Vikings. On Easter island trees were harvested for moving Moai to their erect locations, but boats made of wood were essential to keep trade to other island alive. The Moai were a tribute to political leadership. Trade was a lifeline to the isolated location. Wrong choice! Vikings also remained dependent on trees for their boats, but had none in Greenland. They survived by raiding, but needed boats to do it. The Inuits were there too and while they perished, the Inuits are still there - Inuits could live off of existing resources, Vikings couldn’t. Mayans lived off existing resources initially but their success made them grow and grow, outstripping their ability to survive with such large populations, on those same resources. What about us -capitalism demands obsessive growth, populations are getting too big, resources are diminishing against over-consumption, ecological collapse is changing the world faster that we will be able to adapt to it.


#11

I heard that there was some concern that the detonation could trigger a firestorm which would consume all the planet’s oxygen, with about half of the scientists on the yes-it-will side, and half on the no-it-won’t side—but, as you say, they still went ahead with it. Apparently the decision was based on there being no one left to object if the yes-it-wills were right.


#12

And this interview was from 1973 proving the US hasn’t learned a single lesson. Thanks for that video.


#13

Of course, the US gov. in response to WHO proclamation that Round-Up is a ‘probable human carcinogen’ is denial. It’s on the shelves, ready to poison us. Profits before Survival! USA! USA!


#14

Nature abhors monoculture.


#15

Yes… I love watching those history shows on the demise of Civiliztions. Most were due to Defirestation. They had no idea back then, yet We know all about it and still ignore the past and continue on the same path leading to the same result. Too late know. The tipping point has been reached years ago.


#16

Yes, but in the Spring and Summer, look at the displays of Round Up and other Chemicals just like it stacked as soon as you enter a Home Depot or Lowe’s. Then look at the stupid people on the check out line!


#17

Not many Bees to pollinate my organic garden over the last few years either.


#18

The incrementalists are correct about the public will to address the climate crisis.

But that doesn’t change the fact that the window for addressing it came and went while our leaders displayed an almost unbelievable lack of urgency about, if not outright denial of, our trajectory.

i guess things have to reach straight up chaos and mass death before they can act decisively. And oops, it’s already too late.


#19

That is literally true. They had debates about the possibility that it could ignite the atmosphere. They went ahead. i guess they thought they had decent odds. i mean, what did they have to lose…


#20

Love this! Oh how uncomfortable that must have been for the network, right?