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Scientists Warn Crashing Insect Population Puts 'Planet's Ecosystems and Survival of Mankind' at Risk


#21

The “Coprophagous Insects” that inhabit our political system in Washington DC are in no apparent danger of extinction.

They also feed on the Money of the rich and powerful.

Their appetite for the immoral and unethical is insatiable and destructive to the ecosystem of our country.


#22

This planet has been here for billions of years. Mankind for perhaps millions of years. Yet in just a few hundred years greed has nearly destroyed the planet.
Fireworks and happy dancing anyone? I didn’t think so.


#23

“But this is the stuff that worries me most. We don’t know what we’re doing, not trying to stop it, [and] with big consequences we don’t really understand.”

Breaking it down,

"We don’t know what we’re doing,… " The problem is, we kind of do know what we’re doing and it isn’t pretty at all. Certain Siberian islands are on high alert because massive numbers of polar bears have invaded the islands and they’re all quite hungry. So, what happens to humanity when we see repeated failures of the world’s wheat, corn and rice harvests?

“…not trying to stop it, …” It matters who, precisely, isn’t trying to stop it. Most of our often corrupted elected officials, absolutely! The scientist uttering this pronouncement, well, he spends so many hours a week on the climate project. He has a hard-driving job to maintain and maybe kids to raise and all that, but at least he’s rather aware of the problem.

“with big consequences we don’t really understand.” We’ll try.


#24

Poor hungry bears!


#25

Looks like humanity has “screwed the pupa”, so to speak. And here I thought insects were going to replace red meat as an earth friendly source of protein. I guess Soylent Green is our only choice. There soon will be plenty of raw material lying around to manufacture it from. A “Growth industry” when ya can’t grow nothing else. Capitalism is infinitely adaptable.


#26

Some of the missing fireflies are in my backyard. They were abundant around 1960, they disappeared in the latter decades of the twentieth century, and they returned about ten years ago. The reasons for their disappearance are unclear, but their return might be explained by two bits of habitat improvement. First, some trees got big and blocked the light from the nearby street lights. The dark areas allow the fireflies to see the flashing of other fireflies, so they’re attracted to the yard. Second, I always mow and mulch the fallen leaves in the autumn, and the top several inches of soil are now 100% humus, soft and spongy, and a good home for larvae.

In any case, for much of the summer I host a firefly frenzy of flirting and mating. It’s a real orgy out there!


#27

I’m sure our friends on the right side of political spectrum are all in an absolute panic about this…
:smirk_cat:


#28

Hitler heard that same prediction and promptly stopped all work on the hydrogen bomb.
Should tell you something about America’s vaunted leadership.


#29

We are almost 8 years into a global extinction in which an average of 200 species have disappeared every single day.
People have not noticed because it has largely been affecting insects and the oceans.
It is still unclear how much of the total global insect population have been decimated, i have seen numbers from 40-95%, but we do know the pelagic fish population has been reduced by around 95% and phytoplankton by around 55%.
Loss of biodiversity will kill us long before rising sea levels or unstable weather gets a chance to.


#30

Hi Wise Owl. I read Silent Spring which is a really old book. I wonder why no one seemed to listen—I heard too that Rachel Carson died of cancer…I wondered if the pesticides were already doing their work. Sometimes I think that WW2 and the Nagasaki and Hiroshima bombs changed a lot of things about death and killing. Armies like the UK and America did a number on Dresden too. Hmm carpet bombing every living thing—that’s what pesticides do now …carpet bombing Nature and all life on Earth. : (


#31

Oh I’m sure both sides are…especially those with corporate ties.


#32

The birds too are dying because of lack of insect food. Every year i see the reduced numbers of migrating bee eaters.


#33

And now we have particle accelerators. A few years ago they were attempting to create a “mini big bang”. It was held up because some birds got into the system somehow. But i believe they tried it eventually.


#34

after 400 million years of evolution. That was quick. Maybe if mankind had another million years or so, we’d get it right, but we got this bug called $$ profit and the quickest and easiest profit.


#35

Sadly, I believe that it was simply a matter of profit motive. I spent some time working with the nuclear industry on the civilian side (researching issues in radioactive waste disposal) and can attest that profit motives can and do facilitate a great deal of cognitive dissonance in the nuker kookers. The same phenomena play out in agriculture, energy, medicine, etc. By externalizing costs to human and planetary health, the “free market” has set both causes into a tailspin. Until our decision-making apparatuses (economics) are corrected, I only foresee more of the same.


#36

For numerous reasons, some beyond our species’s control, and some a wiser, more intelligent species could have controlled, the planet has reached and overshot it’s carrying capacity, and it’s overtaxed ecosystems are crashing… One reason for example is that a clever but less intelligent species has spread toxic chemicals like glyphosate and insecticides throughout the environment. It shouldn’t be any wonder that the insect population is crashing. An intelligent species would actually try to do something about saving it’s home. Ours won’t


#37

Hi theoldgoat: Thank you for this video, and thank you so much to Howard Zinn who began the truth telling for many American students with, " THE PEOPLE’S History of the United States." : )