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Selma, the Birthplace of Modern Democracy in America

#1

Selma, the Birthplace of Modern Democracy in America

Jesse Jackson

This past weekend, political leaders from across the country gathered in Selma, Alabama, to commemorate “Bloody Sunday,” the 1965 march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge where peaceful demonstrators, attempting to cross the bridge, were violently driven back by Alabama State Troopers, Dallas County Sheriff’s deputies and a horse-mounted posse wielding billy clubs and water hoses to savage the crowd.

The horrors played on TV sets across the country generated a national outrage that provided the final impetus for passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

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#2

Selma is an example of the reality that it is the PEOPLE that bring a nation Democracy and Civil rights. It is not the Countries leaders. The “Founding Fathers” never intended that Women or Blacks should vote. They intended for only white males with property to vote which is actually less Democratic than no vote at all.

It was the PEOPLE from whom those rights came.

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#3

HI Suspiradeprofundis------although, the idea of males of a certain social status having more rights than other people was the rule in ancient Greece. Ancient Greek women even of the higher class, had few rights and that was pretty much what the America’s founders saw as normal— In their time of the 18th century it was normal too. Until of course people moved out into the wide open spaces of the west and everybody, male and female had to prove their worth and contribute
.It really is true that the People ultimately affect the society—the 1930s certainly proved that. Even WW 2 gave women more power to work outside of the home. Those WW 2 benefits which gave a lot to a lot more people and a better place in society have atrophied and it’s time for another BIG CHANGE of the People, by the People and for the People. : )
All these old…"… truths are self evident. " : )

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#4

Did you ever notice than when a catastrophe happens such as a huge weather storm passes through an area, the people come together and become humans who help each other ? We just might be seeing more of this behavior relative to the pollution and climate crisis.

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#5

Well that Greece also had a Patriarchy does not mean it was inevitable or how it had to be. Indeed if you read “The Chalice and the Blade” Patriarchy is rather new in the course of Human history . Archeological finds in Turkey so societies that existed several thousand years ago that treated man and woman much more equitably. In the “Chalice and the Blade” the author makes the case that this all changed when violence and brute force via warfare became an accepted form of behaviour inside the species. This lead to the breakdown of the Social norms that existed at the time and ultimately led to the most brutal and violent imposing their will on others.

Human history goes back a lot further than initially thought and many of those older societies did not embrace war as so many do today. We only think it normal because it has been the way things done for a few thousand years too many.

Patriarchy is born in war and it my humble opinion that women will not gain equality by becoming “warriors” and joining Militaries. What has to happen is the Males have to UNJOIN the Military and the embrace of violence and warfare.

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#6

HI SuspiraDeProfundís: I haven’t read the book, so thank you for that. However, the hetera in ancient Greece were the only women who did have freedom, real freedom. The Bible sadly is not woman friendly very much at all. It seems that women had more power when women gave proof to a mysterious process----birth----and people were not quite sure what caused it. That effect still exists today in some places. : )
My favorite effect for rethinking war is still to have only Congress allowed to declare war, and those who vote for war immediately leave Congress and go straight to the front lines. : )

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