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Senator: "Let Me Repeat... The US Helped Bomb A DOCTORS WITHOUT BORDERS CHOLERA TREATMENT FACILITY"


#21

Actually JoanRobinson, there’s nothing left. In the 2016 elections we had the two worst candidates, by for, running for President. Even tho there were several viable and relatively speaking not so bad cadidates running as third party candidates. Sadly, all these candidates together garnered less than 5% of the national vote. American voters will only vote for Democrats or Republicans, all of whom are incurably corrupt. The two major
parties have no self-correcting mechanism and they will continue to get worse.


#22

Yeah, I don’t think you are taking into account the biggest things Americans are doing; not voting. Turnout for 2014 was the lowest in the post-WWII era. The turnout in 2016 was the lowest turnout in a presidential election in decades. Trump will inspire Democrats to vote in 2018 to an extent, but that party is a pile of hot garbage. If it was a party worth a damn, the Republicans would be wiped the hell out. But the DCCC, those running the DNC, and the donors pulling all of the strings, have worked hard to insure that nothing changes, and the public doesn’t want the Democrats as they have been in recent decades. Turnout in 2018 might be higher than in 2014, but it isn’t certain, and if the Democrats do in 2020 what they did in 2016 (almost certain), then they’re gone. I don’t see the party recovering at that point, unless people just clean house.

Well over 40% of the public doesn’t identify with either of these shitty parties, people have left the Democratic Party in massive numbers in recent decades, the party’s lead has went away this election cycle, it’s candidate for president in 2016 lost to the most unpopular major party nominee in history and there is a huge gap between what people want on policy, and what the government is actually doing. The public agrees with the left on almost every major issue. That stuff isn’t being offered, the corrupt system and parties refuse to change, and the policies of the status quo continue to make everything progressively worse. People simply aren’t bothering to vote, and they shouldn’t. Trump is a monster, but so are many national Democrats. Our system is worse, much worse, because of them all.

I think people would support third parties. Polls show that they would. There isn’t a single third party that has built a national infrastructure, and no third party is involved in peoples’ daily lives and struggles (at the national level at least), like the Socialist Party was in the early 20th century. So, I don’t think people see the point of voting for something that doesn’t have any impact. I think the path for third parties is at the local level. Carter in Virginia, Jensen in Minn, Sawant, people like that. Do that everywhere, and years down the road you might have an infrastructure in place to start really taking on the dying Democratic Party.


#23

Is anyone surprised. They want to kill as many Yemeni’s as possible, of course they bomb a cholera treatment facility during a cholera epidemic, simple psychopathic logic. They also blow up other hospitals, schools, bridges, power plants, water supplies and block ports.
They want to kill, kill, kill, as many as possible as fast as possible short of chemical weapons (if they could figure out a way to blame Syria and Russia for the use of chemical weapons on Yemen, you know they would and they would gas tens of thousands) and oh look they are actively using a biological weapon, in this case cholera, how accidental was the outbreak, did they purposefully spread cholera in Yemen, destruction of this facility proof of their intent to enhance the use of biological weapons to kill as many as possible.
Look https://www.scipress.com/ILSHS.9.65 Vibrio Cholerae specifically identified as a researched biological weapon https://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/intro/bio_cholera.htm.
So destruction of that specific facility pretty solid proof they have been spreading cholera on purpose and aim to maximise the results of biological warfare by purposefully targeting and destroying specific ant-infection medical facilities.
This is a straight up war crime and should be investigated as well as the likely spreading of Cholera by Saudi forces with the backing of the UK and US governments, all war criminals.


#24

This “winning” is, like, wow!


#25

This absolutely makes no sense. Is the American policy toward one religious faction over another worth the label of genocidal terrorist? Is Middle Eastern oil so important to a nation that exports oil that we support these atrocities? What threat would Yemen present to us if we were supporting them instead of the monsters who are attacking a nation that only wants to be let alone? I have only myself to blame for not understanding why I am having to be even asking these questions but I still would like a helpful answer.


#26

Ofcourse it’s intentional, there are many groosome examples as the one in Kunduz Afghanistan repeated firing despite being alerted and alarmed. This is an accepted policy of both Israeli and US militaries. Israel started this barbarism in Palestine and Lebanon.


#27

Thanks go to Israel and it’s barbaric Zionist MAFIA regime.


#28

Senator: "Let Me Repeat… The US Helped Bomb A DOCTORS WITHOUT BORDERS CHOLERA TREATMENT FACILITY"
"Whether intentional or a result of negligence, it is totally unacceptable," said the medical aid group in a statement

Likely intentional —

Our government is all about violence and death and this has been true for decades now –

How can any American continue to believe that our government supports democracy?

It is dedicated to wars and destructions – period.

I guess we all have serious questions to ask ourselves as to whether we feel personally
responsible for our government and the violence and destruction it is causing other nations
and their citizens?

What do we owe the world in rising up non-violently to begin to move our government to the LEFT?


#29

The Socialist party gained considerable strength in the early 20th century and it worth understanding how that came about. As a point of reference this is also when Canada’s own Socialist Party was at its strongest.

The growth of that party was very much a Grass Roots thing at the local level that exploded rapidly across the country. The strength of the party was predicated on two major elements. One was the large population of farmers. Farmers tended to own the land they were on and could at least grow their own food if they did not have a regular income. Along with this there were far more small family owned businesses and the owners of those while not particularly wealthy could ally with the farmer in a reciprocal relationship. This synergy allowed the people to work much more effectively outside of the system.

Since that time the number of family farms has plummeted as has the number of small businesses that could operate outside the system. The working class relies more and more on the SYSTEM for any sort of income. If they do not play by the rules , they lose their home or go hungry. The greater the ownership of assets shifts to the 1 percent , the less power the working class has.

While I quite agree that the revolution needed at the grassroots level , it is much more difficult to pull off has the SYSTEMS structure makes it much harder to function outside of it. It not impossible , but it very difficult and this difficulty acts to ensure only some small numbers manage it.


#30

I agree, it is very hard, so is putting in place a coherent alternative to this particular “globalization”, one that is environmentally sustainable, equitable, democratic. In other words, everything this globalization isn’t. I cut my teeth in the alter-globalization movement, and putting in place the alternatives would be hard. It couldn’t be done just at the local level, there would have to be organizing across borders, outside of traditional party structures and political systems. No easy task, but I also think that those that argue that the Democratic Party can be reformed have greatly exaggerated how relatively easy it would be. I don’t think reforming that party is any easier than building an alternative infrastructure, and what that rotten party has done in recent years, how impervious to change it is, should make that clear. And I really fear that if we get people to funnel their activism to a party as corrupt and internally authoritarian as the Democratic Party now is, can lead to a lot of disillusionment with activism and politics in general. The elites here seem to think that a revolution is impossible, but it isn’t, and a revolution in this system with no strong role for the left, no alternative institutions and policies, could be chaotic and could lead to a far right government. Things are going to get much worse in the coming decades, the environmental crisis alone guarantees that, and I feel that the left is doing a horrible job of creating coherent alternatives. If we don’t, the far right will fill a vacuum that the system failure is going to create, and then we’re truly fucked.


#31

God help us. Everyone on that list is part of the duopoly monster. Which is why it showed up in the Washington post. Never forget WHY these people are on this list though - this list of liars SAID what we want. Then when you look closer, oh wait. Wasn’t it cool when Bernie ditched his $27 donations for the 501c so he could except large donations right after he conceded - you remember when much of his staff quit. And, oh yeah that campaign manager he took on that was a giant red flag. Wake up people. Stop voting for the duopoly. I guarantee they will Obama you - tell you what you want to hear and do the opposite.


#32

And don’t EVER forget that Cory Booker voted with big pharma and against cheap prescription drugs last year showing his now, repeatedly flown, corporate flag, in bold relief.


#33

practically all of this list votes for the war budget and the slaughter of civilians around the world. You did not mention ONE true progressive.


#34

Clearly the US did this very deliberately. Just like they did in destroying the Afghan MSF facility murdering dozens of patients and doctors. The US … beacon of hate and violence around the world…


#35

I haven’t forgotten that. I even read a piece that tried to rationalize that vote (but I don’t buy it). He is on the half of the list that I wouldn’t vote for (but if I lived in a swing state instead of CA, I probably would).

It wasn’t my list of course. But I happen to think Bernie with all of his faults is a true progressive - others will disagree, that’s fine. I’m also interested in Chris Murphy now because he’s put some real effort into the Yemen issue and isn’t afraid to say pretty direct things on how horrible it is for us to be killing civilians. I had thought Sherrod Brown wasn’t that bad, but I don’t know much. No on McAuliffe for sure, don’t know Patrick, not crazy about Gillibrand, no on Biden, yes on Warren and Sanders though sure I’d always wish they were better yet. I’m still evaluating Kamala Harris (my senator). At least she has dropped corporate PAC money (I’m aware Booker has also, but he already has that strike against him for me).

Two of my favorite democrats are Ro Khanna and Tulsi Gabbard, but I know they don’t meet everyone’s definition of progressive here either (and neither are going to be running). Sure I’d be ecstatic to have a chance to vote for Barbara Lee. Is there any other true progressive you’d care to mention?


#36

Suspira –

Thank you for filling in some of the needed details of history . . .

The Socialist party gained considerable strength in the early 20th century while Canada’s own Socialist Party was at its strongest.

The growth of that party was very much a Grass Roots thing at the local level that exploded rapidly across the country. The strength of the party was predicated on two major elements. One was the large population of farmers. Farmers tended to own the land they were on and could at least grow their own food if they did not have a regular income. Along with this there were far more small family owned businesses and the owners of those while not particularly wealthy could ally with the farmer in a reciprocal relationship. This synergy allowed the people to work much more effectively outside of the system.

Very much agree with you here . . .

“Since that time the number of family farms has plummeted as has the number of small businesses that could operate outside the system. The working class relies more and more on the SYSTEM for any sort of income. If they do not play by the rules , they lose their home or go hungry. The greater the ownership of assets shifts to the 1 percent , the less power the working class has”

I’ve often commented on the need to begin a non-violent opposition to capitalism and Elites BEFORE they gain 1000% control over the nation where they will no longer need the “system” nor need to engage in business for wealth and control. Right now the dependence on the “system” may still work for both sides.
For instance, in a united response if they overturn Net Neutrality by pulling the plug on cable.

I would also add that Senator Huey Long/D-Louisiana had an interesting history with pushing socialist ideals – and not sure if it mentions it in the Wiki article, but I believe he actually went door-to-door in pushing the idea of Social Security.

The article is worth reading as pretty much we all are familiar with Huey Long’s assassination, but his true history is in his efforts to “Share the wealth” and to “redistribute” the wealth from the few to the many in the US. Long failed to support Roosevelt’s New Deal when he thought it was moving to the “right.” He also criticized Roosevelt for not supporting “redistribution” of wealth. Long was also an opponent of the Federal Reserve Bank blaming their policies for the Great Depression. And, the “Oil Trust,” of course …

In his autobiography, Long indicates that he and his friends “were outraged at the persistence with which the big oil companies [which he called the Oil Trust] resisted the payment of taxes and with the political opposition they continued to give us.”[46]

Note – Senator Huey Long – and "Share the Wealth"

A Democrat and an outspoken populist, Long denounced the wealthy elites and the banks. Initially a supporter of Franklin D. Roosevelt during his first 100 days in office, Long eventually came to believe that Roosevelt’s “New Deal” policies did not do enough to alleviate the issues of the poor. In time, he developed his own solution: the “Share Our Wealth” program, which would establish a net asset tax, the earnings of which would be redistributed so as to curb the poverty and homelessness epidemic nationwide during the Great Depression.[1]

Long’s Share Our Wealth plan was established on February 23, 1934 with the motto “Every Man a King”. To stimulate the economy, Long advocated federal spending on public works, schools and colleges, and old age pensions. Long argued that his plan would enable everyone to have at least a car, a radio, and a home worth $5000.[1]

Long split with Roosevelt in June 1933 to plan his own presidential bid for 1936 in alliance with the influential Catholic priest and radio commentator Charles Coughlin. Long was assassinated in 1935, and his national movement soon faded, but his legacy continued in Louisiana through his wife, Senator Rose McConnell Long; his son, Senator Russell B. Long, and his brothers, Earl Kemp Long and George S. Long, as well as several other more distant relatives.[2]

During Long’s years in power, great strides were made in infrastructure, education and health care. Long was notable among southern politicians for avoiding race baiting, and according to Harry T. Williams, Long sought to improve the lot of poor blacks as well as poor whites.[3] Under Long’s leadership, hospitals and educational institutions were expanded, a system of charity hospitals was set up that provided health care for the poor, massive highway construction and free bridges brought an end to rural isolation. He remains a controversial figure in Louisiana history, with critics and supporters debating whether he could have become a dictator, or was a demagogue.[4]


#37

And no doubt that the US troops will be sent in there, either overtly or covertly. They will be told that they are “fighting for our freedoms” and they will be dying to “ensure democracy.”

What BS…!!!


#38

Just read about Huey Long…appeared to be someone concerned for the proper treatment of people and the right use of wealth.

No wonder they shot his ass.


#39

Edward –

Exactly –

How prominent has been his “assassination” while the reality behind it –
his attack on Elites/wealthy is, imo, fairly well hidden.
You can also see the reason for the attacks on Wikipedia and the “editing”
that’s been happening since the Trump take-over to “convolute” all of their
reports.

No matter what we would imagine today (pretty much) in ending this deliberate
agenda to impoverish more and more of our population for the benefit of Elites,
Huey Long was already there and trying for far more!

Thanks for your response!
(smile)


#40

Yeah, I never heard about his concern for the poor or his desire for proper use of wealth, but that’s the way we are brainwashed in school. Kind of like the way we were taught that the “Indians” (i.e. Native Americans) were the bad guys. Not a word about all the various massacres, broken treaties, and forced migrations in which thousands died.

But our country is EXCEPTIONAL!!