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Shattering Mark Set During Dust Bowl, US Just Had Hottest May Ever Recorded


#1

Shattering Mark Set During Dust Bowl, US Just Had Hottest May Ever Recorded

Jake Johnson, staff writer

Surpassing a mark set during the peak of the Dust Bowl in 1934, the continental United States just had its warmest May on record thanks in large part to the human-caused climate crisis, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced on Wednesday.


#2

Oh pish. You should be demanding higher pay for workers at Wal Mart and Disneyland, then go shopping for summer clothes for your kids.

Lighten up.


#3

I’ll take NOAA’s word for it but in the northeast May seemed cooler than normal. As did April and especially March. Very long winter here. Glad it finally ended.


#4

Here is an interesting look at when Shell admitted that the production of oil and natural gas was leading to global climate change:

Big Oil has, for decades, known the repercussions of its business model.


#5

I’m not sure where you are but here in the upper Ohio valley and western Pa we were over eighty almost every day in May. That was a follow up to the wettest April ever around here, the second coldest March, but the absolute warmest February ever.
What is happening was all foretold by climate scientists over thirty years ago. Only it’s happening much faster than they imagined.


#6

So, if we exterminate half the people on earth tomorrow global warming will magically stop?
You need a shtick troll.


#7

And as seen so often now, when the temperature returns to slightly below average, everybody proclaims “look at how unusually cold it is!”. FYI, the average temperature for today is a high of 77 and a low of 54. Yesterday was below normal, but not unusually so. Daily record high temperatures are broken with some regularity, but daily record cold temperatures are never set anymore.


#8

Exponential, nonlinear warming is underway. Everything will be happening “much faster than we thought.” Buckle up and hold on! Likely near term human extinction by mid century.


#9

It seems that here in the Burgh we missed spring again. Had about a week of it and jumped right into summer.
The weather has been absolutely psychotic around here for the last few years. The old “normal” highs and lows don’t seem to apply anymore.


#10

I’m not sure what you mean by “northeast” but in New York City, May was 4.5 degrees F above normal, reaching a very unusual 92 on May 3, and only 9 days out of the month had average-or-below temperatures. And regarding the supposed long, bitter cold winter this year, the heating degree days for new York City for the past heating season were about 95 percent of normal, indicating a slightly warmer than normal winter overall.

It is remarkable how much AGW has altered people’s perception of what the “normal temperature” for various times of year are - kind of a “climate amnesia”.


#11

Exactly. When I first moved to Pittsburgh from further south and east (DC area) I always wondered why people bothered with A/C - especially central A/C up here. The average early morning low in July-August is (or is supposed to be) 62 to 63, and the average high is supposed to be just 83, so just opening the windows and running some fans, then closing the house up in the evening to keep the cool air in used to work fine except for a handful of hot days, when a small window A/C was useful. But this increasingly does not work anymore.


#12

When I was a kid from the late sixties to the early eighties we had a couple of hot summers but nothing that required extensive AC use. Now we have central air and its on from late April to October. Every summer is hot around here now. The weather really seemed to change in the early 1990’s. Longer summers, shorter winters, autumn lasting until near Christmas, and almost no Spring.
Our niece lives in your old stomping grounds, down near Richmond and Newport News. We visited last spring and it was over 90 the whole week. I don’t know how they do it.


#13

Yup. We’re doomed unless we get to below 3 tons CO2 emitted per human per year by 2023. What have you done today to lower your carbon footprint? The change is definitely exponential in nature.


#14

On second thought I guess May was a little warmer than normal. There were a couple of days in late February that were ridiculously warm. March was one for the books. Four nor’easters with large scale power outages from two of them. I think it was the snowiest month of the winter. April started out super cold with baseball players having to bundle up to play in weather that was cold for football. I don’t know how baseball fans can sit through those freezing early season games. I would say spring weather finally appeared in very late April. The trees seemed to come out late this year which would be expected given how cold March and April were. I think the last few years it has been the west coast and Alaska which has been largely responsible for the record highs in the US. I believe when a global temperature record was set in 2016 the northeast was colder than normal. I am pretty much going by what NASA and NOAA says and not by what it feels like outside around here.


#15

Why is it that people think that insults matter? I am simply repeating what I hear on this site.

Yes, there is the bother of CO2 having destroyed the atmosphere causing chaos to the weather and water supplies and habitat around the globe.

But instead let’s talk about how Wal Mart and Disney employees don’t get paid enough to feed their families!

So rather than argue, I agree. Go have more kids. Don’t forget to run to Wal Mart to get poster board and paints for them so they too can protest for higher wages.


#16

Manmade climate change and climate science are too deep and incremental as a foundation for our concerns about the environment, because they are too easy to misunderstand, distort, and obfuscate.
The better foundation is one that is undeniable: the anthropogenic mass extinction event.
Nobody can deny that humans are destroying more and more native flora and fauna, intact ecosystems, forests, lakes, rivers, oceans…replacing them with concrete, asphalt, and other urbanization aspects.
Nobody can deny that biodiversity is rapidly decreasing, our pollution is fouling air, land, and water, the extractive industries are stripping the earth and killing the oceans, and that the world is a far noisier, more crowded, more polluted and less peaceful place than it used to be.
As long as consumer capitalism and human population growth are worshiped, we are on track to commit ecocide within a few decades. This cute video well illustrates our species:


#17

Sorry for sounding critical, but A/C is a very addictive, and for healthy people, unnecessary substance with a huge carbon footprint. Somehow, people survived and even thrived in places like Atlanta or New Orleans or Tuscon before its invention. Once you start using it, the more you need it for comfort. For example, I’ve always been amazed at the way air-conditioning (especially in commercial spaces and workplaces) will be set to 65F (because 75F is uncomfortably hot), in summer, but 72-75F in winter (because 65F is uncomfortably cold) WTF?

And who, in summer, sleeps under a only linen sheet at night? And how many nowadays think that just a t-shirt is appropriate indoor wear in winter? (Oh for days of “Jimmy Cardigan”)

And just like automobile dependency, and all that ice and plastic straws in water in restaurants, A/C dependency seems to be one of those things that has been finely engineered and indoctrinated into US culture by fossil fuel interests.

During the recent hot weather, we caved in a bit and ran the A/C for just 2 hours a couple evenings to knock the humidity down, then opened the windows and ran the fans (good ones being increasingly hard to find in the local big-boxes) when we went to bed. Maybe it is because it is older and less efficient, but my A/C’s electricity usage is huge.


#18

I’m afraid we’re 30-40 years ahead of schedule when I first learned about the dangers of global warming in the early 70’s. What’s happening now was originally predicted to occur around 2050 or so. Population didn’t increase as fast as first predicted in the book I read in the 60’s. Everything else is ahead of schedule. And increasing at faster rates every decade for those that have some math: it’s sort of like a differential with increasing changeX over changeY . There’s no way to do it properly on a QWERTY keyboard.


#19

We keep the ac about 70, and set the heat at about 68. We recently got rid of the 4 bedroom in the county and moved into town near the hospital where my better half works. Much smaller 2 bedroom. It cut our utility bills in half. I could use a new compressor though. The one at this house is about 18 years old and I’m sure there are more efficient ones out there.


#20

Yeah, I’m afraid we’re in a whole new realm of physics now. I guess we should have seen this coming as positive feedback loops are proving very difficult to predict.
Whatever higher math we use at this point I’m afraid our global warming ship has sailed, and it’s heading for an iceberg.