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Slow, Clean, Good Food


#1

Slow, Clean, Good Food

Winona LaDuke

In an impressive fossil fuels travel day, I left the Standing Rock reservation and flew to Italy for the International Slow Food gathering known as Terra Madre. A world congress of harvesters, farmers, chefs and political leaders, this is basically the World Food Olympics. This is my fifth trip to Italy for Slow Food. I first went with Margaret Smith, when the White Earth Land Recovery Project won the Slow Food Award for Biodiversity in 2003, for our work to protect wild rice from genetic engineering.


#2

Corporate and most fast food has little or no nutrition because of the profit factor. Examples: 1. Why are preservatives used in corporate food? Answer: to increase shelf life to enhance their bottom line because, even though not healthy for us it keeps the food from spoiling.

  1. Why is milk pasteurized when raw milk is so much healthier for you? When it has been scientifically proven that heating milk to a high temperature destroys the good enzymes. Same answer. I can site many other examples, but it would make this post too long.

#3

Thank you for sharing Slow Food gatherings, it is very important work along with many other farmers trying to save their farms and the planet. Soil could be part of our salvation.


#4

Having seen how the too-big-to-fail banks enjoy the lucrative taxpayer funded (tens of trillions of dollars so far) bailout profit center furnished courtesy of Dubya, Obama and the best Congress money can buy, the insurance drug and chemical industries have been on a merger and acquisitions binge for the past 8 years with no end in sight.

In addition to monopolizing markets the bailouts these merged companies will leverage will drain all "domestic programs" including Social Security and Medicare.


#5

At least non-pasteurized milk is available in the USA. If you want good cheese you must go to Europe. All cheese sold in the USA must be pasteurized, which makes the cheese rubbery and reduces the nutritional value. Even imported cheese must be pasteurized. There is no reason to pasteurize if adequate cleanliness standards are followed -- Big agribusiness doesn't want to spend the extra $ to keep their dairy processes clean and they don't want competition from mom and pop operations producing natural cheese. It's all about money, right?


#6

I am skeptical of "renewable fuel" for flying. The author must have been referring to this NYT announcement: JetBlue Makes Biofuels Deal to Curtail Greenhouse Gases. The planes will be using a mix of 30% plant oils-derived fuel and 70% traditional fuel. The same article mentions subsidies for biodiesel growers.
It is likely these subsidies are for GMO corn - at least i never heard of subsidies for US organic crops! Biofuel corn is not only taking away land and water that should be for organic food, there is a another hidden subsidy to Monsanto as well: cheap fossil fuel is used in growing the crops and making fertilizers and pesticides. This ends up being another net contributor to climate change. An optimistic hope is that the biofuel company SG Preston is ethical and only processes donated "plant waste".


#7

What an inspiring piece.

And a counter balance to the skull head that leers from the products that Monsanto, Bayer and their ilk offer.

In slow food we have instead gratitude and a celebration of the healing power of the plants that offer their lives and vitality to us.


#8
  1. Hybrid varietals bred to grow fast have less nutrition because they grow before they can absorb it

  2. Chemical fertilizers produce hollow calories because they are just the few chemicals needed to make quick growth and kill off the soil biota the produce nutrition.

It goes on.


#9

Yeah. Given what planes use, the idea that the sort of travel people do now is sustainable from biofuel is optimistic.

Still, this is good work. I would be willing to gamble that LaDuke is doing more to prepare us for the moment when the oil is not worth extracting than whatever the petrol might be used for otherwise.


#10

At least non-pasteurized milk is available in the USA.

Ah, no. A couple of states have very restrictive laws making it just barely "available". Many of them are even trying to stop people who own their own cow and contract with a framer to care for the cow and deliver the milk, from making such arrangements. (Called a "cow share" or more generally, a "herd share".)


#11

Hi Oatstraw. You are right, raw milk is just barely available. In California the government persecuted Alta Dena Dairy for years and finally removed their raw milk from the shelves http://www.realmilk.com/commentary/vendetta-against-alta-dena-dairy/ So now I can't buy the milk I drank as a child.


#12

Yes. Thanks for your reply.

And don't even get me started on GMO's!


#13

True. The average American has a horrible diet. Just like corporate news is bad for your brain; corporate food is very bad for your health but of course big corporate pharma loves it!


#14

What an outstanding and insightful article -and movement.

It's good to hear that peoples around the world are sharing their experiences and coming to common conclusions that result in healthy, common sense advice for all of us.


#15

Ya, CA ag dept wants to claim that a herd share involves a "delivery" of milk, and that they have control over all "delivery". So I can't buy a cow, rent land, hire a farmer, and have them give me the milk - whether it be me as an individual ,or a group and a few cows. These bureaucrats are truly out of control.


#16

Yeah, raw milk production is regulated nearly out of existence while Wall St. goes about its business largely unregulated. The government is only strict with the little guys.