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Sorry, Santa: North Pole Temps Could Climb 50 Degrees F Above Normal


#1

Sorry, Santa: North Pole Temps Could Climb 50 Degrees F Above Normal

Andrea Germanos, staff writer

Santa will like be feeling toasty as he does his final checks on the naughty-or-nice list because temperatures at the North Pole on Thursday are forecast to be as much as 50 degrees F above normal.

Temperatures are expected to climb to near the freeing point of 32 degrees F, computer models show.


#2

Come on Common Dreams - use metric - get with the program progressives - the English system is a dead end.

Giga tonnes of Carbon is also the preferred metric for CO2 emissions...

Why not make this a New Years Resolution CD - metric !


#3

At least the report isn't that huge plumes of methane are rising from thawing permafrost in the Arctic. Let's hope that isn't next unprecedented observation that we hear from the Arctic region.


#4

Why are you afraid to say what's even more important--GLOBAL WARMING THREATENS OUR CONTINUED EXISTENCE AS A SPECIES!!


#5

It certainly could lead to a massive population crash. In fact, climate scientist Kevin Anderson has predicted if the temperature goes beyond 4C the population will be reduced to about half a billion. Whether it actually threatens the existence of the human species is debatable. My guess is that there is very little possibility of extinction. I don't think scientists can provide a clear answer.


#6

If global warming is now "feeding on itself" (which appears probable), the implication is that warming will continue until a new equilibrium is reached--and we'll be "long gone" before that!


#7

The warming of our planet is going to only increase exponentially. People seem to have a hard time grasping that. The warming that is underway is not linear, but nonlinear. And yes, methane (CH4) is already bubbling out of the permafrost in the Arctic. Granted, we're not seeing the explosive extinction-inducing "burp" that has been discussed amount climate scientists. But it is already happening. As far as human extinction is concerned. We as a species can probably live in a 4C above base line warming world. However, plants and animals cannot adapt to such a rapid pace of change. For that reason, there will be a tremendous die off of most life forms, including humans. When there will be nothing to grow and harvest due to it being to warm, there will be resulting widespread famine and starvation. Trees already look sick compared to just ten years ago. What will flora look like in another ten years? Will it be too warm to grow rice, wheat, and other grains? I don't think we have much time left. Just try and enjoy and love those who are in your life.


#8

As an engineer (who travels between the US and Canada fairly often) I wholeheartedly agree! Trouble is, the left due to their general innumeracy, seems to be even more resistant to tossing the archaic US measurement syatem than the right is!


#13

Quick suggestion: Don't drive to climate change rallies. If you have any options, don't drive at all. If you don't know why this matters -- learn.


#14

Wisconsin here -- long, warm autumn. Regardless, note the first word of "global warming." This is based on changing climate trends worldwide over a long period of time. An increase of only a few degrees in global temperature can have a profound impact. One of the more noticeable aspects of global warming has been the slow, steady increase of powerful, violent weather systems. In short, "it's complicated."


#16

Problem we being 7000 billion we will run around killing each other as food and water go into decline, and of course India, Pakistan, China, Russia, the USA, UK and France , not to mention Israel all have far too many nuclear weapons. And then there are those 460 current nuclear power plants that will not cope with lack of attention.

As systems go into decline our assorted nations will each seek psychopaths like Clinton and Trump to save them.

India and Pakistan are presently squabbling over the headwaters of the Indus River; China is damming the Mekong, and this will affect Vietnam and Cambodia very seriously. We are our own threat of extinction.


#17

Just because the French peasants could only count to 10 on ten fingers after their revolution in 1792, does it mean we have to do the same? They also tried 10 days in a week and 10 weeks in a year (fail!). And also measured the girth of the earth to get a standard for their kilometre and got it wrong. We smart Brits used the second of arc subtended at the equator to define our nautical mile; far more clever. I can count to 12 or 16 on one hand and using the other hand could get to several powers of either number. Our hours and degrees work in 60s; thank the Babylonians for that.The inch is highly practical and by dividing by half one can pretty well estimate down to 1/32 of an inch, which is useful try estimating tenths, particularly of a centimetre accurately.The metric system is fine but..... use a brain!


#18

Another quick suggestion, stop eating meat. Ditto about the learning.


#19

No ice on North Pole? No problem, just makes it possible to drill. There are no climate issues here, just the question of ever higher profits due to the increased availability of resources. Methane release? No worry, just think of lower gas prices once we figure out how to get that into the pipeline. We will adapt to any negative climate changes and figure out how to grow crops despite ever increasing temperatures, Monsanto already is developing heat resistant crops for our benefit. The future is bright with amazing property values here in WV as mass migration begins and all those folks start moving inland with the new coast line ripe for all kinds of development. The future is sunny, warm and bright thanks to neo-liberals, neo-conservatives, corporatism, capitalism and our strong military. Yes my friends it is a world designed just for us, sit back and enjoy the show.


#20

We don't need no stinking natural extinction event, we are doing it to ourselves just fine.


#21

Except for the NW, monthly average temperature have been well above average throughout the CONUS. We will be seeing 15 degrees here in Pittsburgh the day after Christmas with temperatures continuing at above normal for the long term after that.


#22

Several fairly recent books by American authors have been exclusively in metric - eg:

Being a Canadian, born & raised in Montreal, but having lived most of my life out west, I can say bilingualism is highly overrated, and though useful, or perhaps necessary more truthfully - it is dangerous at times.

Several of my relatives - supposedly fluidly bilingual, have told me that the result is lack of expertise in either.

In any case - Happy Holidays Yunzer !


#23

Actually, science (this book is less for the layman than other scientists) is always done in metric in the US. But getting metric into everyday usage has been impossible. Carter started a metrification program - some metric highway signs even went up. But when Reagan was elected, metric went the way of the solar panels on the white house roof. The obstinate refusal of USAns to metrify is simply a result of the insular-exceptionalist-arrogance that permeates US popular culture. Look at all the other obstinate differences in the us - abbreviation of dates, colors of political parties, locations of controls in cars, electric voltages (ok, Canada goes along with this), urban infrastructure - especially public transportation.

And here a big best-kept secret. As a civil engineer working for a US regulatory agency reviewing engineers plans for safety-critical mine tailings and other types of dams developed by private-sector engineers, I can vouch that the state of civil engineering proficiency and practice in the US is appallingly bad. Presumably this is true of some other fields too, notably mechanical engineering. If the US were to ever get serious about our surface infrastructure notably intercity high speed rail, public transit, we would not even have the engineering skill to do it. We would have to use European or Canadian engineers to do the design. The construction contractors and construction supervision - and even some of the trades, would likewise have to be from Europe - as if the US is Afghanistan ca. the 1950s or something.

And progress in science in general in the US is only surviving on the importation of better-educated people from other countries - notably east and south Asia. I recall seeing coverage of the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory rover from the control room of the JPL in Pasadena, California. Virtually the entire staff was Asian immigrants.

If skilled immigrants stop coming to the US, it will be all over. The USA is on the way down-down-down. The result is not going to be pretty.


#25

manysummits wrote:

'Come on Common Dreams - use metric - get with the program progressives - the English system is a dead end.

'Giga tonnes of Carbon is also the preferred metric for CO2 emissions...'

A tonne is not the SI unit for mass; a kilogram (equal to 0.001 tonne) is. And the mass of carbon is not the mass of carbon dioxide.


#26

George_III wrote:

'...And also measured the girth of the earth to get a standard for their kilometre and got it wrong. We smart Brits used the second of arc subtended at the equator to define our nautical mile; far more clever....'

But off by a factor of 60 (it's a minute of arc). The meter definition was short-lived, replaced by one based on the wavelength of radiation of krypton-86. Currently, the definition is based on tthe speed of light in a vacuum.

Mnemonics can be helpful for memorizing conversion factors. Here in the US, it's "A pint's a pound the world around". But on your side of the pond, it's "A pint of pure water weighs a pound and a quarter".