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Spreading 'Like Wildfire': Majority of Americans—Including 74% of Democrats—Now Support Single-Payer


#21

That is basically what HR 676 does along with a few other things.


#22

Its deja vu all over again. I’ve heard Liberals say single payer is gaining steam and all this, but then they give us Obama/Romney care.

With Liberals like that who needs conservatives?


#23

The simple answer is that Establishment Democrats are as opposed to single payer as any right-winger. And the dumb Liberal herd follows.


#24

I was just thinking how complex and confusing they (the powers that be) have made everything in the US and technology has apparently not helped. Things should be as easy, clear and simple as possible but confusion and chaos benefits those in power and the elite. Most of us don’t have the time, energy, money or attorneys to get what we really deserve. We are put through processes which cause physical and emotional discomfort. We are overwhelmed. It is called “shock & awe” and we used it in Iraq to overwhelm the opposition. I feel very, very angry at the way these politicians use our soldiers and then throw them out after they’ve used them. How do we put a stop to this neo-liberal disaster the rich and powerful have created in the US?


#25

Greatly improve Medi-Care for all from birth to death not single payer corp. care


#26

It begins in each state by a volunteer or two who get the word out to other single payer supporters-activists to write letters to the editor and opinion pieces on an agreed date or on a rolling agreed dates and to make the case why this is the only way to cover everyone in any significantly affordable manner. We need to provide multiple links to information that the general public can read and get informed. These letters should encourage others in the general population to write letters after they read the information and understand that it would be in their self interest.

I planted the idea last evening with an activist in the Vermont branch of the League of Women Voters and she told me they will be having a single payer caucus in Chicago in the near future. We need also to emphasize that we need to stop the endless wars of choice that destroy lives and the treasury and that tax breaks to the obscenely rich need to be reversed.

The poster Baska gave me the idea of also focusing on getting the low income folks involved by offering something they need such as vans that provide healthcare or go to food banks and distribute single payer healthcare information and talk to them. Also, Baska made the point of registering them to vote by providing voter registration forms at these venues frequented by the poor.

A sample for your network, short and simple:

Hi everyone,

Want to interest you and your wider networks for single payer in a coordinated letter-to-editor and/or opinion pieces where we agree on a particular date or perhaps on a rolling basis where we make the case for single payer. These can serve not only to highlight the benefits of true single payer, HR676, but can serve to galvanize others who will be encourage to also write letters and get their friends and family to do likewise.

I have been posting this idea online encouraging people in other states to do likewise.

Solidarity,


#27

Good point. A “right” is something that exists when the ‘demos’/people are being subjected to an oppressive system. It means that the governance is conducted with something other than the well being of the people as primary premise.


#28

I wish I had an answer.


#29

I am going to forward your story far and wide.


#30

You seem to be unaware that you are paying more right now, than you would with single payer health care, which would get rid of pharmaceutical and insurance company wasted overhead, excessive management salaries and obscene profits – all of which are parasites on our health budget, not to mention excessive overhead healthcare providers have to hire to fight with the insurance and drug companies.

Why aren’t you complaining about that?


#31

I am really sorry to hear about your bullshit treatment. I did not know about that happening at all. FUCK this government!!!

$24,000? Geezus H. Kryst! You need to spread your story to more places than sites like this. Is there anyone out there than can direct dogpaddle to where he might find an ear or two who might help???!!!


#32

“the current ‘Medicare for All’ plan that Dem politicians - including Sanders - support is a watered-down…plan”

Conyers’ HR 676 is the real deal.



#33

Why do you say that? I don’t buy AbominalCare.
It’s amusing that you assume to know what I pay for health care.

And replace all that with the famously efficient government spending.

For the most cost effective health care, keep big business and big government out of the mix.
The least expensive health care is you and your doctor and the staff she needs to handle health care. Period.
Every third party paper pusher, industry or government, drives up costs dramatically.

And nearly everyone here confuses health care with insurance of some sort. Pitiful.

“Oh no, we’ll just all get free health insurance from the government!!” is either the belief of children or the desire of criminals who wish to benefit from the labor of others.


#34

If you’re going to get D-Party corporate puppets on board, you’ll have to vote most of their Congressional delegation out of office. And when the newly elected Blue Dogs take over the caucus in 2018, it’ll be even more of an uphill climb.


#35

Meanwhile, people like my mother who are died in the red of the blood of bombed brown skinned children republican and proud of it doesn’t have medical insurance, refuses to participate in obamacare, and frets over the costs of any medical care that she knows she’s going to have to pay out of pocket and wipe out her cash savings as she’s a couple years from retirement age. As sad as it may be, I have no sympathy for my mother. She voted herself into her mess.


#36

I don’t need to make any assumptions about how you pay for your healthcare.

Doesn’t matter if you buy Obamacare, have employer-based insurance, have Medicare or Medicaid or no insurance at all. If you ever get healthcare from a doctor, hospital, or other provider, or use prescription drugs, you’re paying too much because we don’t have single payer healthcare.

Glad you brought that up. Yes, in the case of Medicare, the government is famously efficient:

To measure the administrative costs for Medicare, we turned to the 2017 Annual Report of the Boards of Trustees of the Federal Hospital Insurance and Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Funds – the document prepared by Medicare’s fiscal overseers.

The trustees’ summary listed total Medicare expenditures of $678.7 billion for 2016, of which $9.2 billion was characterized as “administrative expenses.” That works out to 1.4 percent (emphasis added)

Meanwhile…Average insurers’ overhead costs are about 12.4 percent, according to an April 2017 Annals of Internal Medicine article by Steffie Woolhandler and David U. Himmelstein. A February report from the Center for Economic and Policy Research totaled overhead costs for private individual and employer based plans at 12.3 percent in 2015. And America’s Health Insurance Plans found that 17.8 cents of every premium dollar goes to operating costs.

But those are averages looking across health care markets. When the Congressional Budget Office broke those costs down, they put administrative costs in the nongroup market at 20 percent, small-group market at 16 percent and the large-group market at 11 percent.

So, yes, government serving as a single payer administrator would be far more efficient than the current system.

I’m unaware of anyone here (trolls excepted) who believes healthcare or health insurance are free. Nor do we confuse insurance with healthcare. Sure, it would be nice if you could just have your doctor and you in the mix not have all this other infrastructure. Unfortunately, this does nothing to address the catastrophic results on individuals occasioned by serious injury or disease, which would bankrupt most of us. Nor does it keep hospitals open 24/7/365. Hence, we have insurance as a way to share that risk, and average that experience among all of us to insure that a health event doesn’t ruin us economically – which, by the way, in turn drives up healthcare costs as members of the bankrupt’s family also lose everything, including access to healthcare going forward, until they show up at the emergency room. Guess who gets to pay for that? You do!

And as I noted above, having government in the mix does not, in fact, drive up the cost dramatically as you assert. Having private insurance and big pharma in the mix definitely drives up the cost dramatically, though.

And one last thing. The support for single payer healthcare is not the belief of children as you assert, rather it’s the experience of the rest of the developed world and the only sane approach to this issue.


#37

…and save money, according to all credible studies. We’re already spending enough; let’s spend it on healthcare, instead of on subsidizing the insurance industry.


#38

Yo, one more time, I want what Canada has, stat!


#39

It does no such thing, in any country. argue for what you prefer, but don’t lie.

What you will get is what govt decided it will pay for, given your age and it’s budget.


#40

Nah, the only sane approach is to get the cause of the cost issues out of the system, and that cause is govt.