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Spreading 'Like Wildfire': Majority of Americans—Including 74% of Democrats—Now Support Single-Payer


#46

Tom Johnson? Why is your name coming up on my screen for my comments? Do you really want to get into what us discussion board old timers have called flame wars? My reply was not controversial, so I don’t know where you are coming from besides outer space.


#47

Hey congressperson, Give us the same medical coverage you enjoy. You are hired to represent ,we the people. Truth is YOU represent the health insurance industry. Whores for money in order to remain in office. The sheeple are shorn each election tuesday.


#48

short answer…don’t volunteer for war especially wars started by liars-in-chief.


#49

That sort of sounds like a Tea Party call to get just get the government out of health care period. The cost of health care are going up everywhere regardless of the system. The US has the problem of defensive medicine where physicians afraid of malpractice suits run extra tests which can be very expensive. Obviously all the CT scans, MRI scans, PET scans, etc are expensive due to the equipment and trained technicians involved as well as experts needed to interpret the results. Laboratory testing also can cost a lot. There are all kind of surgical procedures that are performed. Various scoping procedures are common and expensive. Some drugs that are not commonly used can be very costly. When you want the best medical care available it is going to cost a lot of money. Government is not the problem but it could find ways to reduce costs.


#50

Actually, the medical equipment is expensive, however, with the prices doctors charge patients, it really doesn’t take long to pay it off.

The polls have already shown that “Medicare for ALL” is the term to use…not single payer. Much higher percentage of people when asked vote for Medicare for all!! And when you think about it, all Congress would have do is drop the age to qualify. Right now it is 65. Just make it 55 and above …then 45 and above until finally everyone is covered. How easy is that?


#51

I just watched an elderly woman walk away from the prescription counter at Rite Aid/Walgreens Caribou Maine in tears because she couldn’t afford the prescription. Single payer was due a century ago. People are dying of common and curable illnesses because of greed and profiteering from medications that cost pennies to produce and most of the R&D is done in college labs and by government grants. Gutless putz like Paul Ryan should never have been allowed through the doors of the house, now he is probably on his way to lobby for the drug industry. We have created this ugly mess, how do we undo it?


#52

All indications are that here in Canada the Liberal Governmnet will introduce Pharmacare Nation wide which will be modeled on our Universal Health Care system and ensure all Canadians can access prescription drugs which will be paid for using the single payer model.

If THAT gets off the ground the Conservatives will be on the outside looking in for a long time.

It worth pointing out that when Stepehn Harper in power and the Conservatives had a majority , while there underlying belief is that the model for providing model care should more closely resmble that idiotic model that they have in the USA , they could do little to erode the current system knowing full well it would cost them heavily at the polls.

This is a simple fact. Prior to he introduction of our system at the Federal level in Canada in around 1972 , our systemw as very much like that in the USA. SINCE that time not only have health care costs dropped relative to what Americans pay, but life expectancies and positive medical outcomes in Canada have increased more rapidly then in the USA, this even as Canada grew more ethnically diverse.

In other words the Government model outperforms the private for profit model.


#53

Please get this story to local media and encourage everyone you know to write to the local media to make the case for single payer HR 676.


#54

yes, the VA system is more akin to the NHS.


#55

There is no help. This as been going on for 17 years, with no attention. My Congress critters are tone deaf.

The mass media has been hijacked. When Ted Turner sold CNN, that was the end of liberal media. Amy Goodman is (almost) all we have left.


#56

You are woefully uninformed.


#57

Call them what you wish. But those “liberals” are typical Republicans. They are more interested in where their next corporate campaign donation is coming from (Pelosi, Schumer and the rest)

“For every blue-collar Democrat we lose in western Pennsylvania, we will pick up two moderate Republicans in the suburbs in Philadelphia, and you can repeat that in Ohio and Illinois and Wisconsin.”—Schumer


#58

Your list contains some very different systems. The UK has a system like the VA. Canada has a system like Medicare. France covers everything and has good results, but has high out-of-pocket costs - so people have to buy private insurance to avoid those. Germany’s system is a multi-payer system more like a version of Obamacare that covers everyone with mandatory private insurance added on top of government insurance for most, little to no expenses for the poor and for children, and paid by a regressive tax system that has a cap on contributions. Sweden’s system is government funded at the local rather than national level. Norway’s system has private spending on health care at one of the lowest levels in the world (a $250 deductible per year for regular care and another deductible for specialists is about it).

All these systems do better than the U.S. in terms of costs and outcomes - but each country has it’s own model. The debate in the U.S. seems to always be about who will pay and what will be covered. To me those questions are obvious - single payer is the simplest and progressive taxation is the fairest and essentially all (non-elective) health care costs should be covered. But answering those questions doesn’t automatically make the system produce the best outcomes. We also need to answer the question of how to incentivize innovation, quality, efficiency, and affability of experience.


#60

The entire Washington single payer movement, including good old sell out Bernie, is nothing more than a pile of political bully poop. Neither wing of our Wall Street Owned One Party System (WOOPS) is going to propose and pass a single payer system that will, by being a true national health care system, totally wipe out at least a trillion dollars or more in annual profits to the Medical Cartel (MediCart). Please disabuse yourselves of the notion that any elected official to a Money Seat in the Feral Government is going to do anything to help We, The Rabble. It just ain’t in their job description! Medicare and Medicaid provide slightly over 60% of the profits to the largest health insurance companies and if you think blind loyalty to people like Sanders and the rest of the New Democrat Party is going to do anything for We, The Rabble then you deserve not to get the health care we deserve as a basic human right while the rich and their corporations are not paying their fair share of taxes all while hundreds of thousands of us are dying each year from lack of health care and drugs designed for profit and not medical treatment (both uninsured and underinsured). If you think Obamacare is so great because a few people can get subsidised to purchase Wall Street’s lousy health care threshold insurance then you need to understand who proposed Obamacare and that it was designed to protect and increase the profits of Wall Street against an ever stronger tide for a true single payer system providing universal health care. The private/public insurance policies Wall Street sells and Obamacare, Medicare, Medicaid and the Veterans Administration are all designed not to deliver cures and/or life extending medical care. They are simply components of MediCart’s corrupted system that we are oppressed and exploited by.

I have been disabled for over 32 years due to my time in Vietnam and am a 100% service connected, totally and permanently disabled veteran. I am on Medicare, was on SSI, AFDC and Medicaid. So I have experienced the entire MediCart system of non health care. They are all corrupt and frankly my dear they don’t give a damn about us - Yes Virgil and Virginia there ain’t no Santa Claus. After being a patient for over 20 years in a VA teaching hospital connected with a university medical school I believe that at least 95% of those training to be doctors and nurses go into medicine motivated to treat us. It is only after doctors become residents and begin to manage cases that they quickly learn how corrupt the entire system is and repeatedly see that outside of ER care for genuine emergency care profit controls virtually everything they do. After so many years of education to obtain a medical license few are willing to risk loss of license to fight MediCart. Doctors and even hospitals have a right to complain about reimbursement rates under MediCart and it control of all of the federal medical non care delivery systems. As it stands now nothing much is going to change. With the looming economic implosion we will have the opportunity to change the entire paradigm of economic governance and institute a government where We, The People are actually the source of government and not the 1% who wrote and instituted the Feral Government and have exploited us since before the so called Revolution. Instead of your majesty, lords and ladies we now just call them Multi-Billionaires. Until we end the capitalist system of economic governance we will all continue to be nothing more than profits and not citizens.


#61

No, what we will point out is that by not participating you will be foisting your costs on the rest of us when you have a serious health event and can’t pay for it but get your healthcare nonetheless. You simply want to be a freeloader. We want to minimize the costs to all of us and equally share the burden of healthcare. Citizenship in a civilized society comes with some responsibilities. People like you are part of the problem.

Your ad hominen attacks are a form of logical fallacy, the most common form, in fact, and carry no weight around here.


#62

Oh right, and it use to be excellent care, far better than most single payer plans. Have you visited a consulting agency about your situation, sometimes there are ways to adjust for eligibility without resorting or things like divorce. You just have to know what they are and get some guidance if people are not helping as they should. I know what you mean there should be a way forward that doesn’t result in damage to your health.


#63

if someone suggested a divorce to a vet as part of an entrance/benefits interview, that someone should not be employed any more. That’s a pretty gross ethical violation. Generally, if you’re a vet that’s not earning income and you can’t be carried on a spouse’s pan, then you’ll be approved. Half the patients that go there are double dipping on insurances–a lot are on medicare, too–suggesting they don’t even need the care at the VA (one of my pet peeves, actually) But yeah, usually a trip to see the patient benefits admin will result in a solution. If you don’t have access to medical and you’re a veteran, the VA will see you as an indigent patient.


#64

I’m not a Vet but I had to arrange care for family that were. I know at one point it became difficult to manage both Tri-care and Medicare. The preference though was Tri-care. One medication under Medicare was a $75 dollar co-pay, with Tri-care it $3.50.

Sometimes you can separate assets and there are others that are perfectly legal.


#65

A few, to borrow you vernacular, not so obvious facts would useful here. Specifically, that prices are beasts altogether different from costs and it’s vitally important keep the two concepts separate.

I’ll focus on MRIs as an example. The installed cost, including facilities, of a brand new, state-of-the-art 3 Tesla MRI machine can reach $5,000,000. The typical life of an MRI is 11.4 years, or 136.8 months. If you 100% finance an MRI at 8% APR, you’ll be paying about $33.5k per month to pay for the machine.

If you perform 5 scans a day on average, you’d need to charge $223 per scan to pay for the machine. If it costs you, say, $100 per scan for a tech to run the machine ($500 per day – more than those techs get paid I’m guessing) and $400 per scan for a professional radiologist or physician to read the scan ($2,000 per day), then your “cost” to have an MRI machine and run it and read its results is about $723 per scan. Mind you this is for a brand new state-of-the-art machine. Most machines are not nearly as costly.

Meanwhile, the average price for an MRI scan in the US is $2,611, nearly four times the cost of the most up-to-date state-of-the-art machine.

Don’t be so quick to buy the argument that these machines and their support systems are nearly as costly as the prices charged for them.


#66

“An approach so sane that I can’t be allowed to opt out of it?..I’ll not oppose ‘single payer’…as long as it’s…voluntary…Oh, we can’t allow choice on that can we?”

Nope. No more than you have “choice” about being taxed for military spending or traffic signs. That’s how most law under democratic government works: a majority vote for laws all must follow.

You’re ok with missiles but don’t like stop signs?

Tough shit - a majority of elected rep’s decide the U.S. will be safer w/military spending; + a majority think U.S. drivers and pedestrians will be safer w/driving norms codified into law.

And now a majority want healthcare for all - minority view notwithstanding.

Oh but wait - you want ANY law to be voluntary? Then American government’s not for you. Beat it.