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Spying on the Wrong People: The Hypocrisy of the Nunes Memo & FISA


#1

Spying on the Wrong People: The Hypocrisy of the Nunes Memo & FISA

Juan Cole

The frenzy over the Nunes memo, likely to be released later today by the Trump administration, contains a profound hypocrisy at its core, one that points to the rot at the core of the American government.

The Republican conspiracy theory promoted by Nunes is that the Federal government over-reached in spying on the Trump campaign.


#2

Seriously, Professor? You were expecting logical consistency???


#3

Snoop at will through your private papers, how about snoop at will through your very private personal body parts? Every time I have been molested at the airport by the TSA, I share with them that they are violating my constitutional and civil rights. How do they respond? They threaten me if I refuse to allow them to “do their job” I will be detained, miss my flight & possibly arrested.The constitution and Bill of Rights are about as sacred to government as toilet tissue these days. All this noise is simply distraction. Our government no longer serves “we the people”! It squeals like a stuck pig when it gets the same treatment as the lowly citizens.


#4

Clearly all the spying on Americans is a way for the elites - represented by both Democratic and Republican politicians - to keep control over anyone who might be tempted to get uppity. If they can use these powers to overthrow Trump that just sets a precedent for them to overthrow any future President.

Is that what we want?


#5

So you think Trump and Co. are “uppity” and that’s the problem? If Trump succeeds in thoroughly subordinating the courts, all law enforcement ( and I am including subordinating local law enforcement to ICE), legislatures, etc., to pure personal demagogic power, that is a problem. Precedents are then meaningless.


#6

Who could of thunk a bureaucracy could bring grift?


#7

Truer words were never writ - “The tendency of Democrats suddenly to lionize former FBI director James Comey because he was fired by Trump, and Comey’s own posturing as a civil libertarian, is part and parcel of the hypocrisy.” DINO’s just covering their own worthless asses and complicit failure as any kind of real “opposition party”!

Both parties, especially the R’Con swine, revere the “flag” ignoring that it is just a symbol of the Constitution and Bill of Rights - one just a “goddamn piece of paper” the other a leftist document interfering with overt racism and the police state…THAT is the reality of the malignant fools/criminals who control our nation!


#8

Trump was a private citizen when this evidence was gathered.

They didn’t need a warrant–that precedent was already set. Remember, the terrorists will win if we have privacy.


#9

After the American Revolution, only a few tories went back to England. Those who stayed became the roots of conservatives today. It should come as no surprise that conservatives today have the same values and are acting just as the supporters of the monarchy did during America’s fight for independence. What really deserves being repeated ad nauseum is that an aristocracy is a conservative government and that having a democratically elected government is a liberal government. You cannot support democracy and not be liberal. Conservatives today are modern day tories and are anathema to a true democracy.


#10

By no means would I argue Trump and company are nice guys, but I disagree that ‘precedents are meaningless’.


#11

I agree - our public servants in the intelligence community are already spying on us, which in my opinion is destructive to freedom and democracy. That faceless and unaccountable bureaucrats have the power to doxx us at any time is what I consider an unfortunate development.


#12

Faceless and unaccountable people and companies all over the world have the power to doxx you. That governments free range over that pasture should no longer be shocking.


#13

You missed the point entirely. A tyrant doesn’t rely on precedents, and citing precedent carries no weight with the lawless. If Trump and co. succeed the very meaning and power of precedent will be in the dustbin. Which is why we have to now defend our imperfect institutions and norms.


#14

And Flynn, Manafort, Page where all agents of foreign governments at the time.


#15

Of course it’s not shocking that tyrants spy on their citizens in the name of ‘national security’ - but in my opinion it is something to be resisted.


#16

The ‘resistance’ handing over the power to overturn democratic elections to our intel services is a poor decision. Some people seem to like this idea without thinking that they will have nothing to stand on when their own candidates get vetoed by the FBI or the CIA or some other shady group.


#17

To serve a majority, democratic party leaders must serve some fair proportion of thoughtful conservative constituent, unlike republican party leaders who have no compunction to serve even a majority of their rank-n-file republican voter. Ideologically, republicans in office become ‘deciders’ there to make ‘decisions’ based on their own individual preference or the whims of the politically powerful and filthy rich.


#18

so…we like it when it works for us and don’t like it when it bites us in the ass? well…duh.

nice sleuthing.


#19

That is not what is happening. You should really pay more attention.


#20

Well golly! So you’re not going to continue the standard Trump defense?