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St. Patrick Was Of Course An Immigrant


#1

St. Patrick Was Of Course An Immigrant

The visit here of Irish P.M. Enda Kenny went as swimmingly as anything in Trumpland: After a series of orange gaffes - hats with four-leaf clover not shamrock, St. Patrick's Day greeting in mangled Gaelic, stilted recitation of his favorite "Irish proverb" that turns out to be a Nigerian poem - Kenny, whose own undocumented immigrants sent solidarity to ours, stressed the status of St. Patrick and so many more. "We were the wretched refuse on the teeming shore. We believed in the shelter of America, in (its) compassion, (its) opportunity... And we still do."


#2

The quintessential "Village Idiot" and bloviating buffoon...a diabolical character taken from the most horrifying, blood splattering dark comics masquerading as president of the USA. He is the world's laughingstock who leaves all with whom he meets shaking their heads in disbelief and dismay.


#3

Prime Minister Kenny's "message" to Trump and his minions was fabulous :shamrock:


#4

I'm not sure calling Patrick an immigrant captures the whole story. He was a missionary for the Catholic church, largely responsible for driving out paganim. One can only guess if the potato famine would have ever occurred had paganism remained intact in Ireland. That said, this resource poor nation still manages to educate its young people all the way through college or trade school. Éirinn go Brách!


#5

Hair Hitler The Flaming Orange Satan's supporters might be the most useful idiot pawns, EVER!


#6

That's true, much of the story of St. Patrick was missing. And, if missionaries throughout the world would have/would stop trying to proselytize while wealthy nations exploit the people and resources in those areas, the world would be better off, in many ways. Still, Kenny's immigration message to Trump was nice to hear.


#7

Wonderful vocabulary. Can you back it up? Examples?


#8

I made this same point recently, but others below have taken it to flights of blarney. According to Oracle I.e. Wiki, Patrick was a non-practicing Christian when kidnapped age 16 fromRoman Britain, and then enslaved in Ireland for 6 years until he escaped to France where he was ordained by St. Martin de Tours. He then went back to Ireland to preach the Christian gospel. Patrick is indeed the perfect saint to represent the plight of all immigrants, enslaved, trafficked, and exploited. Isn't that good enough?
The fact that Through Patrick's mission, Ireland became the land of saints and scholars and kept the light of learning alight throughout the long dark ages after the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West, then shared that learning throughout Europe thus triggering Humanism and the Renaissance.
The comments below take a dim view of such activity however. A great man once Wrote that Leadership and Learning were indispensable to each other. Too many people allow themselves the comfort of opinion, without the discomfort of thought. Tweet that, Mr. T.


#9

"One can only guess..." indeed. You lost me I'm afraid. The potato famine had a devastating effect because the potato was the staple diet. Apart from the potato however, there was no blight in the rest of agriculture and exports of dairy, beef and grain continued despite the starvation. Thus the famine was caused by the ruthless exploitation of Anglo Saxon Capitalism. How would paganism have altered that?


#10

Enda Kenny: Dope


#11

Example from the other day: Angela Merkel shaking her head in disbelief as Trump opens the old gas bag.

Seatower's verbiage is a little flowery: does this mean we should resent him and thoughtlessly reject his statement? Are we at war with academics now? Or are you seriously asking for assistance? Do you need someone to help you identify the source of everyone else's grievances? I like what History Pilot said in this very same thread...

Are you actually trying to do some thinking or are you unloading your opinion?


#12

I want Seatower to back up his verbiage. Simple! He hasn't so far.


#13

Dear “nipples"

The quote on thought vs. opinion is one of many pearls from JFK.

I scatter them liberally in the hope that someone might recognise their worth.

Hugh


#14

Paganism is the belief in the divine character of the natural world and Christianity is the belief in the divine character of man. Had Europeans retained their spirituality through faith in the connectedness of the natural world instead of unattainable perfection in humans, perhaps the peasants would not have starved while the 1% got fat and rich because God somehow deemed them as more deserving.


#15

Good Morning Laura. Many thanks for enlightening me on this concep, which sounds perfect. However, is it not possible to marry both philosophies as Francis of Assisi may have intended. I agree that if we respect Creation - whether we call it Divine or Mother Nature - is immaterial. But as thinking beings, trying to answer the eternal question, "Why are we here?", then Christianity is but one response. I happen to believe in the Dignity of all Humanity, but that dignity is enhanced if we cal likewise respect ourselves, each other, and our environment. It may sound awfully wooly, but in reality would negate the exploitation which is the essence of Capitalism. If Paganism gets you there, I'm with you.


#16

As I do not read dark comics due to their violence, bloodletting, and wholly offensive nature...i have only seen covers and cannot offer examples. DJT has shown how vile he is and there is no comedy in anything he does but he is one villainous character, to be sure.


#17

Nothing in your verbiage, Seatower. That's what I thought. Too many people here getting slaps on the back for writing vacuous verbiage. One could be forgiven for thinking this was a Yahoo forum.


#18

Release the Tax Returns


#19

Didn't you see the Rachel Maddow show, rolson?


#20

Such Wit Extraordinaire