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Taking Path of a 'Pirate Whaling Nation,' Japan Reportedly Set to Resume Commercial Whale-Hunting in Its Waters


#1

Taking Path of a 'Pirate Whaling Nation,' Japan Reportedly Set to Resume Commercial Whale-Hunting in Its Waters

Julia Conley, staff writer
Greenpeace joined a number of Australian wildlife conservation groups in condemning a reported Japanese plan to openly flout three decades of international law banning commercial whaling, saying the country's expected decision to withdraw from a global commission on the issue and allow the killing of whales in its waters for profit would put it "out of step with the rest of the world."

#2

Apparently this is being done because the appetite for whale meat and other whale products among some Japanese citizens greatly exceeds their interest in protecting endangered species, or in showing any mercy or sensitivity towards these amazingly intelligent and complex creatures.

It seems to me an appropriate response by environmentally aware citizens of other countries would be a total boycott of all products marketed by Japanese companies. If the Japanese export market suffered any appreciable damage as a result of the decision to resume commercial whaling, I’m quite certain that activity would soon be abandoned.


#3

In any fishery when a species is in danger a bag limit is enforced. This should apply internationally. Caroline Kennedy as ambassador to Japan fought the slaughter of dolphins and was receiving death threats. Sushi must rule in Japan because they now pursue whale steaks to serve alongside of their dolphin sushi.


#4

Greenpeace is not the at the forefront of this issue and never has been. Exactly why we have Sea Shepherd, the only organization to stand against illegal Japanese whaling for years and years.
The Japanese have been slaughtering hundreds of whales every year, 333 last year alone.
The US, Australia and NZ pay lip service to this issue and do nothing to stop it.