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Targeting Apple for Designing Slow-Down into iPhones, Small French Consumer Group Punches Above Its Weight


#1

Targeting Apple for Designing Slow-Down into iPhones, Small French Consumer Group Punches Above Its Weight

Jon Queally, staff writer

Government launches official probe after it was revealed that iPhones were constructed with "planned obsolescence"


#2

“It has admitted slowing its flagship iPhones phones down, but says this was intended to extend their battery life.”

This is a prime example of whatever the inverse of a conspiracy theory is.

I first heard about this on NPR a few weeks ago. They introduced the accusation that Apple was slowing its older phones by saying this had been a common accusation that was WIDELY DISMISSED AS A CONSPIRACY THEORY.

When Apple was caught and then tried to deflect criticism by saying, essentially, “we did this for your own good,” the reporter said it was comforting to know at least it was done to benefit consumers instead of to take advantage of them, making it quite obvious that HE NOT ONLY BELIEVED THEM, but HE REPORTED THE CLAIM AS IF IT WERE TRUTH.

Yeah, Apple never does anything greedy or shady. Oh wait, wasn’t the last news about the company in reference to it paying almost nothing in taxes because it pretended to be based in Ireland?

Why are people so eager to believe obvious lies, especially to the point of deifying the politician or corporation who is doing the lying?


#3

Apple could have avoided this whole thing, considering all those teenagers who “accidentally” drop their iphones and break them, “coincidentally” as soon as the next model comes out.


#4

The sensationalistic “reporting” by those who clearly understand nothing of technology is pathetic. The idea that a battery powered product should continue to function as well after two or three years of use as it did on the day you bought it is ridiculous on it’s face. Batteries degrade over time. This is an incontrovertible scientific fact. A degraded battery affects performance. Apple did their best to mitigate the problems associated with degraded batteries through throttling processor speeds to prevent spontaneous shutdowns. They could have done a better job of explaining this in advance, but other than that they did nothing wrong. On the contrary, they go out of their way to support older devices with the latest software updates and they do it for free on all platforms (Mac, iOS, tvOS, watchOS).

Show me an automobile that doesn’t require a battery replacement after a few years to keep running properly. What Apple did is implement a software solution to keep your phone from dying unexpectedly in the middle of a task. It would be like a car manufacturer coming up with a software solution to keep your car running on a degraded battery but limiting the top speed to 65 mph.


#5

Have you ever replaced your iPhone battery?


#6

I’ve been an iPhone user from the start. I upgrade every 2 or 3 years because I like to have the latest and greatest features and have never had a battery that performed so poorly that I felt it needed to be replaced. I have replaced batteries in two MacBook Pros to keep them humming along nicely for years longer. Apple even did the battery replacement on the 2013 MacBook Pro I’m typing on right now for free last year when my computer was way past the warranty period.


#7

All Apple has to do was send a text message to iPhone owners stating that they should strongly consider getting a new battery. Instead, they tried to sneak around the problem. Not smart.


#8

If they did that the headlines would scream, “Apple warn customers that their phones won’t work without buying new batteries. 32 class action lawsuits filed.” Damned if they do, damned if they don’t. Sensational Apple headlines generate clicks and attract scummy lawyers like flies to cow poo.


#9

It’s because people have a hard time ascribing fault/guilt/malice to things/people that appear attractive.


#10

The HOP organization which seems so concerned about waste and environmental friendly should wonder what is now happening to all the batteries that Apple is removing from 1, 2, 3 year old phones that would have continued to work for longer span. For customer relations purposes, demands, and threat of law suits, Apple is ordering brand new batteries and replacing them, the new ones will not age any better than the old.
Maybe they should check with GreenPeace about Apple’s manufacturing processes and recycling processes, energy usage and compare them to any other tech firm.


#11
  1. I own a non-Apple smart phone that still works fine after 4 years.
  2. Most non-apple phones have removable covers with batteries that can be replaced (granted, it can be difficult to find a replacement that fits.)
  3. Apple had repeatedly denied it was slowing down older models, and only when it was caught did it come up with an excuse that it was benefitting the user. The original LIE, combined with the timing of the EXCUSE should make their second claim extremely hard to swallow.
  4. My Ford Fiesta is 5 years old and still has the original battery.

#12

Your remark “ They could have done a better job of explaining this in advance…” was about the only thing in your apologist comments that made any sense. It’s also stretches the imagination that anyone in the automotive industry would appreciate your false comparison. You state: “It would be like a car manufacturer coming up with a software solution to keep your car running on a degraded battery but limiting the top speed to 65 mph.” What you omitted from that analogy is the owners of the vehicles being kept in the dark about that ‘feature’. It’s virtually inconceivable that an automotive manufacture would put itself in such a recklessly litigious position with nothing to gain and a lot to lose.

Then when commentator SepticTank quite rationally asked why Apple didn’t merely contact iphone owners of the battery situation, you continued your damage control by asserting that the ‘headlines’ would still crucify Apple anyway, as with your comedic scenario…“Apple warns customers that their phones won’t work without buying new batteries. 32 class action lawsuits filed.” It would seem that Apple’s public image is scarred enough without them resorting to such lame hyperbola or blaming the ‘sensationalizing’ media, who were guilty of reporting the ‘wrong’ kind of news.


#13

Ah, yes, Apple as an environmentalist company. Quite a narrative indeed. If Apple and their sympathizers were concerned about the environment, then encourage them to incorporate their ample tax ‘savings’ for environmentally safer entrepreneurial adventures. How’s that for American values?