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Teacher Killings Ignite Calls for Revolution in Mexico


#1

Teacher Killings Ignite Calls for Revolution in Mexico

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

The Mexican government's deadly crackdown on a teacher's union protest has rattled the nation in recent days, as 200,000 doctors on Wednesday joined the ongoing national strike against President Enrique Peña Nieto's neoliberal reforms.

Anti-government sentiment is mounting after police forces opened fire on a teacher protest in Oaxaca on Sunday, killing at least eight.


#2

The Revolution Is Global


#3

I have used the term "Mars rules" frequently.

Let me share what it essentially represents:

  1. A pervasive ethos of "Might makes right"
  2. A love of weapons
  3. Equating masculinity with the fearless (often irresponsible) use of firepower weaponry
  4. Embracing the Organized Crime protocol of just killing anyone in the way of one's plans or agenda
  5. Leadership bent on war--even when its cause is FIXED (or falsely orchestrated) and/or M.A.D.

Lately, there's been an uptick in all of the following (which reflects the dominance of this Mars-Rules sickness):

  1. Shooting journalists in war zones
  2. Bombing hospitals in or near war zones
  3. Shooting environmentalists in Honduras and Brazil (among other places)
  4. Killing students
  5. Killing teachers
  6. Shoot-outs at "safe havens" like churches (Dylan Roof), post offices, theaters, gay night clubs, and schools! (Sandy Hook)

Imbeciles like Donald Trump PUMP up this mentality. It's based on just acting or acting out with bravado, machismo, and tunnel vision (particularly when the target is someone who's weaker or unarmed or a different gender, race, or religion). It purposely incites violence.

And this malignancy is spreading.

Reciprocally, what's also spreading is femicide and incredible horrors aimed at children. I have delineated these on prior occasions, but if anyone needs their memory refreshed; I will re-post the list.

Following this idea of "the fish rots from the head," when leadership--like Obama--celebrate KILL LISTS and talk a good game about peace while presiding over the world's most over-developed armed forces... and when police departments shoot Black kids and get away with it; and troops enter nations and destroy them and get away with it; and young men rape girls on college campuses and get away with it... the entire fabric of law, decency, justice, and respect for binding human rights disappears.

We're left with the old Law of the Jungle... where the baddest ass bully wins and Mars Rules.

THAT is the true condition of much of this planet today and it's chiefly the result of such disproportionate funding allotted to wars, weaponry, soldiers, and aggression in all of its expressive forms.

This malignancy has been spread far and wide and it's so odious to the Earth Mother that SHE now sends sign after sign that SHE has had enough of it!


#6

Think about how you can live your life, do your work, in opposition to the neoliberal privatization of everything.

These teachers, and their supporters in Mexico, are living and working for humanity.

The sold-out government of Nieto, and his sold-out Institutional Revolutionary Party, and the forces they work for (the same extractivist, bankster, militarist, agro-industrial and techno-industrial looting class that is pushing the same totalizing agenda worldwide) are working to own humanity.

This fight is the same fight. How do we live, and work, in support of life and humanity, in opposition to the forces that seek to claim ownership and control of everything?

How do we live in solidarity with not just these teachers in Oaxaca, but with people everywhere who are facing town the terror of the corporate state? How do we face down the terror of the corporate state? How do we live, and work, and care for our communities, and feed one another, without feeding the corporate state with our lives, our work, our food?

Props and blessings to the Oaxacan teachers, who are responding to the mass murder by state forces of nine of their organizers, by stiffening their resistance. Props to all the organized solidarity in Mexico, including the doctors who have joined the strike. And props to the two Oaxacan government officials who have resigned their posts in solidarity and in protest.

How far will a "political revolution" in the USA go, without us living real lives of solidarity with one another?


#7

And props to Common Dreams for this report.


#9

I think our Canadian Prime Minister should refuse to meet with Nieto until he personally deals with this terrible tragedy in Mexico peacefully and prevents further bloodshed. What a travesty!


#10

Without going the full Stephen King 'The Stand' distance, I hear here, and from Greens and environmentalists a sentiment that the best thing that could happen for the Earth and to man is if a superflu came up, and killed off >95% of the world population, and prevailed eternally, so that man never had to worry about finding enough to eat, just about whether they would come down with the flu and die. A sort of Nature-enforces it population control.


#12

I read the article. The impression I got was that it was one sided. I would be interested in seeing at least a few paragraphs from another point of view. (To those who dismiss other points of view, the ethical things is to at least read a few paragraphs of it, and be able to explain why you're dismissing it, before you dismiss it.)

I read in the news many years ago, before Peña Nieto became President of Mexico, perhaps all the way back to Zedillo, about a months long teachers protest in Oaxaca City. May be they were also demanding the revolutionary overthrow of the Oaxaca state government and replacement with the PRD candidate of the last election (or something further left...), or may be I am confusing it with memory of another protest, same area, that many years ago... What I recall was that the teachers of then were described as quite left-wing and revolutionary minded. Always worth asking what is meant by that label, in their context. And to check whether they are = with the people where they live, or have picked up revolutionary ideas from the university and are trying to proselytize them at home.

I am reminded of 'Relentless Persistence / Nonviolent Action in Latin America', Phil McManus and Gerald Schlabach, co-editors, With an introduction by Leonardo Boff, the introduction, where Sr. Boff talks of three forms of violence, one he called 'consequential violence'. From memory of several years ago, 1 was originating violence. Such as a large landowner trying to force the sale or repurpose of indigenous village property. 2 was the village's violence in response to what was being done to them, and 3 was generalized the whole society turns violent as a result of 1 and 2. But also from memory, I've read that revolutions in China get started when conditions in the countryside get so bad that suffering people go into the forest (a la the Merry Men of Sherwood Forest) and become robbers and brigands, and the region descends into lawlessness.


#13

But maybe Kafka did. ...

I think you are so focused, looking so closely, at the current situation in the USA of demanded immigration into the USA, and of southern and Mideast immigration into Europe, that you are not seeing other cases.
- Algeria expelled its French immigrants after it won independence. (The socialists there have run it so badly that many Algerians have left, too.)
- Similarly, Vietnam pushed out first its French colons, then its immigrant Chinese population.
- Kenya, Uganda and Zimbabwe have pushed their White and Asian (Indian) populations out.
- Haiti killed almost all of its white population when they won their independence. (When the Dominican Republic celebrates its independence, it is its independence from Haiti.)
-- I could name some more.
For many persons peoples, empowerment for themselves has to come at the dispossession and disempowerment of others.
What the world needs more of is respect.


#14

There were no "teacher killings". All the deaths were confirmed not to be teachers. This entire affair has been misreported in the media both in Mexico and around the world. There were 5 deaths at the scene of a roadblock that had been going on for a week. The deaths occurred when the unarmed riot-control police had come to agreement with the protesters to clear the road. Then people not involved in the protest along with apparently at least some of the protesters began harassing the police with small bombs and molotov cocktails, followed shortly by gunfire. The riot police had to call for armed backup from another city. The mob appeared intent on killing police. The backup police arrived after several of the riot police had already had bombs go off in their proximity and several of their members had bullet wounds. The backup police did fire their weapons but at whom is not clear though it is easy to imagine they were trying to target the attackers who appeared to represent the most threat. Two of the deaths were self-inflicted when civilians tried to ignite bombs to throw at the police. Several police also lost fingers from these bombs thrown at them. The riot police were there to clear the highway. Locals had gone without supplies for over a week. These so-called teachers have cost lives and livelihoods with their years of endless protests, but since they get paid whether they work or not, they seem to relish the adventure since apparently many of them aren't qualified to be teachers, and as a father I know not only did these teachers fail members of my family by not showing up to work frequently year after year, but I wouldn't want them in a classroom with my children or grandchildren. Here in Guerrero we are extremely tired of them, and in Oaxaca it has been much worse for their citizens.


#15

The usa should increase the transfer of more military style armament to Mexico to ensure the Mexican people know who the real mafia is.


#16

First off, I have children in Mexico. The news you see here is not what is going on there. The root of the problem is that the teachers don't want to take that test for the education reform. The teachers drag children to the prostest then throw Molotov cocktails thinking that because they have children there they are "safe" from retaliation. Also, if parents, don't support them there is retaliation. their homes, or businesses get burned or worse.

In the teachers view, This education reform has warped into the general discontent of the government.

Meanwhile, the parents want the reform. The parents have found out that the teachers are charging them money for uniforms, books, and even cleaning the school. and that the government has already paid the teachers for these things to be done. The teachers in Oaxaca only teach 1/2 of a day. The parade marching is in the morning, then maybe an hour of teaching, then recess, maybe 30 more minutes of teaching. Then lunch, and school is over.

The parents want the teachers to teach for 7 to 8 hours. The parents want honesty. They want the teachers to care and teach their children, instead of just pasing time for 1/2 of a day so they can get paid.

Parents want their children educated!

Parents want the teachers to take the test!

Parents want a full day of school!

Parents want the teachers to quit asking for money to fund books, uniforms, school cleaning, etc.

Teachers are fining parents if they don't help with anything they ask for.
Teachers are threatening to harm homes, business, and persons if they don't support the teacher strikes.
Teachers Don't want to teach. They like being able to sit for half and day and do nothing.

Also the smart kids get put to the back of the class. They don't get put ahead. they get held back.

I get this first hand from my family living in Oaxaca.
What you see in the news is not what is REALLY going on.