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Temperature in Antarctica Soars Past 69°F as NOAA Reports Last Month Was World's Hottest January on Record

I believe you need to proof-read this statement as well.

Dear Mr. President,

I know you poo-poo all this rising temperature, seawater rise stuff but did you know New York city has more residents in high risk flood zones than any other US city and many of the world’s citizens? Yeah, you being the stable genius you are, that’s probably why you changed your residence. But…pssst…22 of the top 25 American cities vulnerable to coastal flooding are in your new home state of Florida.

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That’s T shirt weather ! I stopped riding my Mt. bike for the winter because it too cold .
Hell, maybe i’ll get some studded tires , throw on some shorts and a t shirt and take a trip south .
Seriously , that’s creepy , but what’s even more creepy is that most people and governments will just shrug it off with the old standby remark of “ hey it’s not in my back yard” . Sigh !

“If all of the Antarctic ice melted, sea levels around the world would rise about 61 meters (200 feet). But the average temperature in Antarctica is -37°C, so the ice there is in no danger of melting. In fact in most parts of the continent it never gets above freezing.” science.howstuffworks

Oh well. 69 degrees!! Ice melts at what temperature? I guess that this is actually good news for the evangelical crowd. Noah all over again and perhaps the highly-awaited rapture. For those with functioning brains and consciences however, this is, like you say, Holy Fucking Shit!!!

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I am becoming worried that governments won’t only shrug it off but will simply avoid even trying to deal with it. I try to imagine what it would take to fix our much damaged climate/environment. I am thinking that it is human nature to put off a really difficult job until one is forced to do it. It may need a huge catastrophe like an unexpected rapid advance of a formerly land based glacier like Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier into the ocean followed by a catastrophic sea level rise of several feet in a short period of time, to provide the necessary impetus to force these politicians to do their jobs! At the moment they shrug and do their best to do nothing or as little as possible that they can get away with.

69F in Antarctica could very well signify that we have waited far too long already. Catastrophes that we expected to see decades from now might already have started their unavoidable paths. If the underwater melt beneath Thwaites Glacier proves to be worst case then catastrophe of an immense scale might only be a few short years away. This degree of melting wasn’t even supposed to be happening but here it is. So what could be done? Fucking nothing that I can see. Zip. Nada D’Nope! Like looking up and seeing a massive avalanche hurtling downslope and you can do nothing else but watch it kill you.

What is there to do that could be swift enough and big enough to make even the slightest difference? All our current green solutions to save Greta’s generation’s future take time. There is no immediate shut off switch for climate change. Every solution takes years to bring to fruition, like getting off fossil fuels for example. Even if we tried to do it all at once it simply isn’t possible. It is happening fast which is great but fast in these circumstances means decades. What if we only had say two or three years before the worst case happens in Antarctica or Greenland. Scientists say no that won’t happen but they didn’t expect this to be happening now either. We have perhaps underestimated the rate of warming to the point of imminent catastrophe. If 69F in Antarctica isn’t scary then what is? The shrinking North Polar Ice Cap was scarily impossible not too long ago but it’s happening and yet the governments shrug just as you say. I am starting to think that we may not be able to avoid catastrophe on the way to stopping climate change. It may take a horrendous catastrophe to motivate governments to make a World War Against Climate Change that our planet needs.

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Go to… e360.yale.edu for some excellent and current climate change data.

Really … HFS !!! I am actually scared for the first time. Climate change was scary but over the long term but now… HFS scary in possibly the short term. It’s hard to believe but it is a reality. Catastrophe could happen at almost anytime (like even only a year or two from now)!

Catastrophe awaits. Welcome to an eventuality of the future that could quite possibly begin tomorrow or anytime soon. An unavoidable long term eventuality has now become possibly imminent. Odd way to start your day with the thought of Thwaite’s Glacier suffering a catastrophic collapse of the floating ice sheet that keeps it back on the land. Currently Thwaite’s Glacier alone has accounted for 4% of sea level rise up until this point. This point being 69F today that is.

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ESL. I now feel oppressed…

An under-ice ridge develops at the land-boundary of the great Antarctic glaciers. I’ve felt for years that the mechanics down there make it possible for a whole lot of ice to slip into the ocean some week, when the ice-cork holding the glacier back is floated up over that ridge (e.g. PIG & Thwaites.)

I haven’t found much literature specifically commenting on the possibility of a quite sudden sea-level rise in this manner. I’m even thinking there might be a global tsunami – that sudden. The paleoclimate record suggests the occurrence of sudden sea-level rise in previous episodes.

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It should be obvious to anyone with half a brain that both political parties are of the mindset that balls out, pedal-to-the-metal capitalism from here on out and to hell with what comes next.

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I’ve seen two modern examples of a let-loose. One ice river in Greenland normally moves at a glacial speed, but all of a sudden it moved 3 miles in 90 minutes. In the other case, the front of a glacier all exploded away in one hour and the whole thing was caught on film and became part of a movie.

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“Aux barricades!” That is why the French government is afraid of the French people. Here we have the opposite. Trump’s next outrage? Find some b.s. reason to declare martial law. You know it.

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Thanks for letting me know, and I apologize for my ambiguous writing.

Global Warming and the fact that human-made emission are the primary cause are definitely not a conspiracy theory. They are scientifically proven facts.

My typing fingers and submit button got the best of me.

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Thanks to @wereflea for letting me know I had written an ambiguous statement.

To be clear: Global Warming and the fact that human-made emission are the primary cause are definitely not a conspiracy theory. They are scientifically proven facts.

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It has always been a theory many have worried about over the years but evidently without cause up till now. Other presidents like Nixon might have wanted to do it but such a step outside of during a world war or two has always a step too far… up till now anyway! This president is too extreme and too autocratic and may actually be cracking up or undergoing early onset dementia. He does such reckless self serving things that even the unthinkable, if it serves his interest, becomes possible.

Such a step might literally tear this country apart not that he would care about that if he thought ‘it necessary’. I kind of think that more sane heads and probably a number of senior military and other department heads would balk at removing Constitutional protections from the whole country just to save Trump’s political ass. But then again I can only hope that would be true.

Now if Trump managed another term and the time to place uber loyal supporters in all the right places then assuming any future attempts to let Trump have a third term will by then have failed… the last two years of a second term for Trump might be ‘the scorpion and the frog’ story for America.

Go Bernie!

Go anybody but Trump if nothing else.

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Sudden sea level rise? A relative term in geology. An extreme if not impossible theory in the minds of denialists and a question never before considered a serious possibility by science but which is now being studied existentially by scientists.

The interior ice would begin a down slope slide were the dam effect of the floating ice sheet to be removed but would a significant portion of the glacier abruptly and catastrophically plough into the sea? My guess is not so much. Nevertheless a more sedate slide that saw a huge amount of ice entering the sea in the course of a year or so and then continuing inexorably after that? That is a HFS scary possibility. To my thinking, standing on the coast road one summer admiring the view at the sea shore and then next year standing in the same exact spot but knee deep in water is pretty damn fast. Nevertheless, they told us 20 years ago that this hollowing out underneath Thwaites Glacier wouldn’t happen for a thousand years. They told us ten years ago that this wouldn’t happen for a century. They were very surprised to find that it is already happening now and can’t say when - not if - the worst could happen. The question now is how fast would the glacier move. It isn’t moving fast as yet (though faster than it ever has before) and they and we can only wait and see. That is ten years unless an El Niño event occurs which is almost a certainty eventually which could warm the oceans even further. An El Niño could make a very bad situation a bit worse which doesn’t help anybody.

At this rate of melt by warmed ocean water which surely will continue to warm even further, I suppose the warning descends from a thousand years to a hundred years till now at ten years. However the whole glacier would not begin to rapidly slide down to the sea at once. But the frontal regions (many miles wide) might be sufficiently perturbed to lose integrity especially considering that melt water has been found atop the glacier in the interior. This means a lubricating layer of semi liquified ice (under great pressure) exists beneath the glacier which could potentially be a critical determinant for a catastrophic entry of a massive amount of ice into the sea in a short period of time (but not all at once Hollywood tsunami-ville style). A foot or so of sea level rise over the course of a year (the southern seas would rise first by the way) is HFS fast in my book. But the knowledge that more rise will continue to follow (though more slowly) is - Good Luck Kiddies time and no doubt about it.

Turns out that we who were the generation in whose lifetime burned the fossil fuels… that we shall not escape the true cost of having done so.

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Greenland melt alone is lifting all ocean-bouyant glacier tongues 1 mm/yr now, and you know the doubling time for most metrics like this is 30 or 40 years.

My latest guru Karl Popper closes Knowledge and the Body-Mind Problem with this thought about disappointments:

But disappointments are met with in all phases of life. Our task is to never give way to a feeling that we did not receive our due. For as long as we live, we always receive more than is our due. To realize this, we have only to learn that there is nothing the world owes us.

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We have long passed the rubicon. There’s no putting the proverbial genie back into the bottle.

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Given that coronavirus has been raised, a thought on the health and climate consequences.
Sadly the growth and subsequent deaths are growing alarmingly.
Countries not reporting incidents in Europe so far are holiday destinations for many Europeans in the summer.
In the interest of their peoples’ health, soon, I suggest, it would be reasonable for their Governments to ban flights and tourists to their countries in the coming summer season.
If this were the case , from a climate perspective,: less flights contributes to less aerosles in the air, less dimming effect, allowing increased heat.
Some international flying is already, I understand, banned.That the spread of the virus seems exponential, so could, equaly the banning of flying.
Just saying.

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Copy and paste from Wiki - note the average max is a bit more than 10° F less than today’s high:

Temperatures reach a minimum of between −80 °C (−112 °F) and −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F) in the interior in winter and reach a maximum of between 5 °C (41 °F) and 15 °C (59 °F) near the coast in summer.
The Northern Antarctica recorded a temperature of 20.75 °C (69.3 °F), which is the highest recorded temperature in the continent on 9 February 2020.

In 2016 when the CO2 reading at Australia’s Cape Grim weather station recorded 400ppm,
The Methane reading was 85 ppm

I am afraid we are much further down this rabbit hole than most folk realise.

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