Home | About | Donate

Tens of Thousands Surround Japan's Parliament Denouncing 'War Legislation'


#1

Tens of Thousands Surround Japan's Parliament Denouncing 'War Legislation'

Sarah Lazare, staff writer

With a new poll showing majority opposition nationwide, tens of thousands of people surrounded Japan's Parliament in Tokyo on Monday to protest Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's proposed "war legislation" that would allow the country's soldiers to deploy abroad for the first time since World War II.

Holding placards that read "no war" and "scrap war legislation," protesters poured into the streets around parliament after breaking through police lines and barriers.


#2

Is it just me or are there more and more demonstrations and protests among the people in different countries?

It is starting to look like the early sixties when protests were still a surprise to most people and folk music was in.

Is a new '60's' beginning to take hold in the public's mind? Austerity seems to have done it for Europe. A bit more than could be tolerated after bank bailouts and all the monopoly capitalism's thrown at people.

People are demonstrating again... marching... doing acts of civil disobedience again... it's got my blood pumping again (such as may be expected...lol)

Peace to those surrounding the parliament building in Japan...

PEACE brothers and sisters.


#3

Tell-tale ongoing evidence, that the fall of Empire is still on-going! Peace is what the People want, here too and everywhere! For the oligarchs and monarchs for over 3,000 years, without end, ad nauseum. These bozos are stooooooopid, or need help.


#5

There is an interesting article today in CD - Climate apocalypse and/or Democracy by J. Purdy. A worthwhile read. He links to an Op-ed piece in yesterday's times which is a bit hair raising as it talks about interment camps, Hitler and lebensraum and the climate crisis to come and genocide.

Definitely check it out redraven.

The Japanese are dealing with the realities of the future. They are vulnerable in many ways with oil, with food, with markets etc. I agree with you that it is not a good sign for the future since it (war) wouldn't work anyway. You almost get the sense that wars will be genocidal - big battles will have high death tolls before the fighting scales down to house to house. Big battles are too f'n lethal with the weapons we use today.

I think the Japanese people are smarter than we are. We could all be rich (in effect) and living in a freaking Star Trek future if we spent as little as do the Japanese on military stuff. We bleed ourselves dry and make this country weak just to keep buying weapons after weapons decade after decade. We forego fixing our bridges and tunnels just to maintain a huge military that we can't really use nor even afford to use (use it at the risk of bankruptcy) and deprive our own countrymen of good life and opportunities for success. Our military is a gigantic tape worm that eats away at our strength and health.

Read that NYTimes op-ed from yesterday. Yikes. and double plus yikes!


#6

"A series of bills ... would allow the country's soldiers to deploy abroad"

So what overseas interests does Japan have overseas? I could be wrong, but I suspect the answer is "very little". It seems to me that their soldiers will in truth be working not for Japan but for the empire.


#7

Abe has long been a mouthpiece in Japan for the deep state junta that rules in America. Given what we know about C.I.A. manipulation of the European political environment it is inconceivable to think that it has less involvement in Japan's internal affairs. I would beg the people of Japan to recommit themselves to the policies of peace and positive relations with their neighbors that has brought prosperity to the entire region.


#8

We're using the illegal WE word too much...


#9

Indeed. However, I expect they have more overseas interests overseas than they have overseas interests at home... sorry, couldn't resist it.


#10

WEreflea


#11

Japan is intravenously connected to Middle East Oil. Hence its stationing its first base and naval port on foreign soil in Djibouti ( ostensibly to help combat pirates).


#12

I do not pretend to be an expert but I do live in S.E. Asia most of the time and follow the Japanese media regularly. I also have a good friend who lived in Tokyo for many years, speaks the language and was a career foreign correspondent. He has helped me understand Japan much more than I ever could from the media alone. What is missing from the news we all hear is the unique social experiment that Japan with the unambiguous support of the overwhelming majority of the public is engaged in and it's relationship to the current Japanese leadership's desire to, in effect, re-arm Japan and make its military available for 'supportive' operations with its allies. The unique project is demographic. The current population of about 125 million will be allowed to shrink by about 35 million people by 2050. The Japanese have chosen to allow this as they have no desire to become a multi-cultural nation and therefore have no intention to bring in migrants or refugees. Already throughout the rural area's of the country, whole villages have de-populated and even the residential suburban communities around Tokyo are dotted with homes without inhabitants. Currently about 23% of the population is over the age of 65. These people are very learned in history and the cruel realities of the world. They are learned as well about the demands that a more militarist government may make to rebuild all that it takes to become and remain competitive in that endeavor. They are also compelled to consider the very real possibility that military engagement, even if it is termed 'supportive' could well be causative to the creation of refugees. The Japanese are very serious people and this would generate a moral consequence that could well sabotage the primary goal of maintaining a mono-cultural society. I do not believe the WEST, meaning America, really concerns itself with externalities such as moral consequence. It is ironic that it was the military power of America that created a constitutionally pacifist state in Japan and now insists Japan re-arm and that doing so would also be constitutional.


#13

I cannot address the Japanese aversion to becoming a multi-cultural nation. Maybe it is the close proximity to China's billions and long cultural influence that makes the Japanese and Koreans this way? It doesn't make any of it right in any case.

My comment referred to the other reality facing Japan. It is on a razor's edge of resource scarcity. A naval blockade of Japan alone creates a siege warfare scenario. Japan cannot withstand a lack of oil for very long. It wants to attach itself to the US military and therefore overseas naval exercises with the US for it's navy are paramount. This closer integration hearkens to a different Japan in the future. A Japan made more self conscious about its resource vulnerabilities. A foreign naval port also allows Japan to ensure its oil supply on its own if it decides to go against US policy too.

I can't say whether it is about refugees in the future but I do know that it about potential resource scarcity now.