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'The Climate Crisis You Haven't Heard of': Even if Carbon Emissions Fall, a Third of Himalayan Ice to Melt by 2100

'The Climate Crisis You Haven't Heard of': Even if Carbon Emissions Fall, a Third of Himalayan Ice to Melt by 2100

Jessica Corbett, staff writer

From the North Pole to Greenland to Antarctica, a series of recent scientific findings on ice loss have heightened alarm among experts, but a landmark study out Monday focuses on what the lead author called "the climate crisis you haven't heard of"—the "shocking" amount of ice the Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) region is set to lose due to rising temperatures by 2100.

Where will all those people go i wonder.

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I haven’t read the report yet but does it mention “rock falls”? Those mountains are held together by ice.

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By 2100?

All predictions have fallen as scientists found the ice melting beneath their feet.

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Trump will probably be gone in 2040. But he is such a pathological liar, if Trump is still around he will still call it a Chinese hoax.

If they say 2100, it means Now. Where will people go? Many will perish in the Mega Storms to come. The Rich already have their million dollar bunkers. The rest of us will have to fight for any resources left. A bleak future for sure.

Even if Carbon EMISSIONS Fall, what about the CO2 and CH4 that are ALREADY IN the Atmosphere?
Even if an impossible miracle occurred and ALL use of fossil fuels ended TODAY, there is so much car­bon ALREADY IN the atmosphere that the earth will continue to warm for several decades.

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Regular precipitation in terms of snow usually melts in a measured fashion into the rivers of China, southeast Asia, Bangladesh, and eastern India. Well, not exactly regular. India and China are monsoony. I presume that without the glaciers as a freezer, precipitation will fall in the same amounts, but disperse immediately, causing regular flooding throughout these areas.
Bangladesh already experiences horrible regular flooding from some rivers due to rising sea levels coupled with the melts.
Sichuan, just east of Tibet, is an interesting case. Si means four. Chuan means rivers. Sichuan takes four rivers frim Tibet and waters much of China, but not in an entirely natural way. Long ago, a complex system of gates, sluices, and dams was created to distribute the flow more evenly. Terracing the hills also helped tremendously to slow sudden rain and overflows. Travelling by bus through Sichuan during its 100-year flood, I saw some of these things in action.
In the center of Chengdu is the Museum of Science and Technology, with a scaled mockup of the system in a large room–push the button and the flood control system begins.
I dont think the article means 2 billion without water, but rather 2 billion without regular river flow, a slightly different disaster.
What can they do? Maybe build more dams? Some research suggests that the giant Wenchuan Earthquake a few years back was precipitatef by the recent dams built in that area.

Cut global emissions? That’s a laugh – they’re slated to increase over the next decade.

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I talked to a student today that who said that their school’s 15,000 college students were going to get air conditioners. Great for them, because it’s going to get hotter! But think about what those ACs are going to do to the air outside and then imagine this happening around the world.

This:

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