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The Electoral College, the Constitution, and Trump's Conflicts of Interest


#1

The Electoral College, the Constitution, and Trump's Conflicts of Interest

John F. Kowal

On Friday, the Brookings Institution issued an analysis of an obscure constitutional provision that should concern every American.


#3

The only point I can make here is would this writer have called on the Electoral College to annul the election of Hilary Rodman Clinton over the Clinton Foundation and all of its foreign entanglements?

The Clinton Foundation operated under the premise of pay for access. This far more blatant then Trumps own entanglements.

Applying the same principles as the authour outlines means neither Hilary Clinton or Donald Trump qualify to be President. The Clinton Foundation with regularity accepts monies from Foreign Governments.


#5

Don scores two logical fallacy points for putting forward a non sequitur and an irrelevant conclusion in the same comment -- way to go Don!

The article and the quoted language are about Russia's interference in the US election, its potential for influencing the Trump presidency, and the relationship of this issue to the Constitution. What, if anything, the US has done to Russia does not disprove the assertion of the quoted language (thus it is a non sequitur) and is irrelevant to the issue (thus it is an irrelevant conclusion) .


#6

Thank you. That really needed to be said. TPTB delivered two horrific candidates, neither of whom is legally qualified to hold that office.


#7

If the electors were to pull the rug out from the Trump presidency, he would cry "Foul!" "Crooked" "Rigged!" and would challenge the legitimacy of the Elrctors actions, and he would have a point, and those who are his enthusiastic supporters -- millions of them, all the people who do believe everything he has said "Believe me" about, will be understandably upset. There will be accusations of underhanded conspiracy and blame flung wildly about.

No one knows who the Electoral College would or could award the presidency to, but it would have to be a Republican. The Supreme Court, being tied two each liberal and conservative would be in no position to settle the issue,

This whole situation is completely unprecedented. How the "essential nation" will pull itself out of this mess is unclear right now, But nobody is happy with how things are or how they're developing, and that is a circumstance fraught with danger,

Are we in any way ready for this?


#8

Here is some info on just a few of Trump's entanglements:
http://www.newsweek.com/2016/12/23/donald-trump-foreign-business-deals-jeopardize-us-531140.html
It is also a disingenuous and HUGE stretch to compare the multitude of Trump's worldwide business conflicts with a charitable foundation. I understand how it is possible to view the foundation with a jaundiced eye, but a lot of good work has been done and there are ways to monitor a single foundation. Bill could have followed the precedent of most previous Presidents (except Carter) and done nothing for humanity. Instead, Bill thought BIG.


#9

IIRC in the (extremely) unlikely case that Trump fails to get 270 votes and assuming the (even more) likely case that HRC does not acheive 270 votes then it falls to the house of representatives who would undoubtedly choose a republican, either Trump (not totally sure that is an option in this case) or Pence.

On the other hand how bad can Trump be? While I am extreme non-fan of his I don't see him being the second coming of Adolph Hitler. He will do lots of things that we really don't like but, I assume, stop short of actually pulling the plug on the constitution and stopping future elections. Assuming this, then, I see Trump seriously escalating the decline of the republican party. There will be no change in 2018 because control of the house is too tight to hit in a single cycle and that particular election will be a bad one for democrats just based on the number of seats up for a vote that year. Starting in 2020...

Unless, of course, Trump actually achieves the 4-5% economic growth he talked about. What with the petro-super-power that the US is about to become and the massive wealth incoming due to that who knows what he can do? But I really don't think so and thus I think change starts in 2020.


#10

Two historic quotes are brought to mind regarding conflicts of interest other than the obvious ones afflicting trump & his regime.

One of the most potentially deadly and subversive influences and conflicts of interest on trump is his attachment and apparent subservience to Israeli influence. A state without any regard for all but their own extremist agenda based in exceptionalist racism - one whose prime interests is illegal expansionism at the expense of all others, cloaked in religion to mask ordinary taking of territory by force, expressly banned in the modern era after WWII.

The subversion of our national interests can be wisely and accurately condensed in the words of George Washington from his Farewell Address of 1796 - his prescient expose the danger we face today from an openly subversive foreign power, manipulating our politicians, elections, and treasonous Congress Members - a reality that should NOT be tolerated!

"So likewise, a passionate attachment of one nation for another produces a variety of evils. Sympathy for the favorite nation, facilitating the illusion of an imaginary common interest in cases where no real common interest exists, and infusing into one the enmities of the other, betrays the former into a participation in the quarrels and wars of the latter without adequate inducement or justification. It leads also to concessions to the favorite nation of privileges denied to others which is apt doubly to injure the nation making the concessions; by unnecessarily parting with what ought to have been retained, and by exciting jealousy, ill-will, and a disposition to retaliate, in the parties from whom equal privileges are withheld. And it gives to ambitious, corrupted, or deluded citizens (who devote themselves to the favorite nation), facility to betray or sacrifice the interests of their own country, without odium, sometimes even with popularity; gilding, with the appearances of a virtuous sense of obligation, a commendable deference for public opinion, or a laudable zeal for public good, the base or foolish compliances of ambition, corruption, or infatuation." - Geo. Washington

The second quote from James Madison regards war and its subversive influence so relevant today.

""Of all the enemies of true liberty, war is, perhaps, the most to be dreaded, because it comprises and develops the germ of every other. War is the parent of armies; from these proceed debts and taxes; and armies, and debts, and taxes are the known instruments for bringing the many under the domination of the few. In war, too, the discretionary power of the Executive is extended; its influence in dealing out offices, honors and emoluments is multiplied; and all the means of seducing the minds, are added to those of subduing the force, of the people. The same malignant aspect in republicanism may be traced in the inequality of fortunes, and the opportunities of fraud, growing out of a state of war, and in the degeneracy of manner and of morals, engendered in both. No nation can preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.

War is in fact the true nurse of executive aggrandizement. In war, a physical force is to be created; and it is the executive will, which is to direct it. In war, the public treasuries are to be unlocked; and it is the executive hand which is to dispense them. In war, the honors and emoluments of office are to be multiplied; and it is the executive patronage under which they are to be enjoyed; and it is the executive brow they are to encircle. The strongest passions and most dangerous weaknesses of the human breast; ambition, avarice, vanity, the honorable or venal love of fame, are all in conspiracy against the desire and duty of peace". -- James Madison