Home | About | Donate

The End of Trump


#1

The End of Trump

Robert Reich

The question is no longer whether there are grounds to impeach Donald Trump. It is when enough Republicans will put their loyalty to America ahead of their loyalty to their party.

Trump’s statements last week about his firing of former FBI director James Comey provide ample evidence that Trump engaged in an obstruction of justice – a major charge in impeachment proceedings brought against Richard M. Nixon and Bill Clinton.


#2

Three words of caution for those blinded by impeachment hysteria: President Mike Pence.


#3

The corporations that own the GOP and most of the Democratic Party have never had loyalty to ANY NATION. The world's first corporations were pirates who contracted with nations to plunder other nations. They had loyalty only to the nations who contracted with them and only until the contracts expired. They were called :privateers". The more globalized the economy becomes, the further from corporate radar loyalty becomes.

Politicians take orders from their corporate funders, not the voters. As long as corporations don't value and have no need for loyalty to the US, neither will the politicians they own.

With the GOP controlling Congress and so many state gubmits, any of the other 2016 GOP primary candidates would be no better than Trump, had they won the primary and general election, or if they were to replace him.

Even if there was a possibility for impeaching Trump, it would solve nothing. As we have seen since Saint Ron's regime, the GOP always has a long list of worse candidates than the one in power. The problems with Trump are systemic and will not diminish irrespective of who replaced Trump if he were to be impeached.


#4

I'm not optimistic about getting enough Republicans in the House to abandon Trump. Their voting bases in many are even more extreme than Trump's. They are often in districts where their they fear losing primaries to someone from the right but not to Democrats in the general election. As long as Trump continues to try to roll back all the social and environmental laws supported by Democrats over the last 80 years he should continue to have a lot support.


#5

Maybe some of the commenters here on CD and elsewhere who keep blowing that "But what about Pence?" horn, should step back from their own cynicism and remember that no matter what Pence might be like that it is Trump who committed the offenses that deserve to see him impeached. Saying Pence would be bad doesn't absolve Trump from his impeachable offenses.

Trump should be impeached as president. America will deal with Pence or whomever after that but first ... Trump needs to be impeached because of what he did while in office... not because we don't like him.


#6

The End Of Trump

Sounds Good To Me.

The End Of Duopoly Rule

Sounds Great To Me.


#7

"In questions of power, then, let no more be heard of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of the Constitution."Thomas Jefferson

As a practical matter, though, nothing will happen until a majority of the House decides on bringing a bill of impeachment. Which means, under the present congress, twenty-two Republicans would have to join with House Democrats to put enough pressure on the Speaker of the House to allow such a bill to be considered.

2018


#8

Same although I do hope that the fervor for the former don't blind people from the latter. Impeaching Trump will be just the first step, not the end goal.


#9

Besides, Pence would be a lame duck from the moment he took the oath. More than the election, the FBI has enough dirt on Trump's Russian racketeering connection to put him away for some time.


#10

"He'll be fired when enough Americans decide they can't abide him anymore."
He'll be terminated when the likes of the Koch bros., Mercers and their counterparts in the corporatization of America find that he is no longer useful to them, or has become more of a detriment.


#11

Reich sez: "In my experience, most elected politicians have two goals – to do what they consider to be the right things for the American public, and to be reelected ..."

This assertion is too larded with qualifiers to be of service. In addition to "In my experience" and the ever-slippery "what they consider to be the right thing", the author has neglected to define "the American public" in this context.


#12

Trump’s obstruction is potentially far more serious. It involves an investigation about whether Trump or his aides colluded with Russia in rigging a presidential election – the most direct assault on American democracy in history,

Reich's commentary started off pretty well in the first three short paragraphs of his commentary, with his platitudes and his redux of the old stories regarding two presidential impeachments, Nixon's lying about Watergate and Billy Clinton's lying about a hand job (and other interactions with Lewinsky) within the sanctity of the White House - Oh my!

But then the wheels started falling off of his essay, with the Russians this and the Russians that and I think "The Russians Are Coming". Whether the Russians are/were involved or not with the conduct of a corrupt, absurd, faux election on the part of the US Duopoly is irrelevant. What is of greater import is the pending collapse of the waning World Imperium, the rapid advance of global heating, and the specter of nuclear war hanging over all life on our planet.


#13

How in the world can you say something so wrong about Republicans:

"In my experience, most elected politicians have two goals – to do what they consider to be the right things for the American public, and to be reelected (not necessarily in that order)."

I see NO evidence of their wanting to do the right thing for American public on any issue donors want something.


#14

The Russia Distraction "...the most direct assault on American Democracy in History."?

No.

THAT was when Allen Dulles martialled the CIA, Military and FBI to murder Our President in 1963, and despite published evidence, have yet to be brought to Justice.


#15

The End of Trump = impeachment?

Sorry Reich, this narrative is premature. It distracts from urgently needed efforts to protect the investigators and the evidence. To do this, we have to keep this news cycle alive and hot. We can't afford to sit on our hands and wait for mid-term election, or for Trump to distract us, and you can bet he will try. We can start with these two simple tasks,

  1. Contact your representative in Congress to urge the appointment of a special prosecutor. This will help ensure that the work by current investigative staff, and the evidence, are protected from further obstruction of justice moves by Trump.

  2. A handful of GOP House seats are up for special elections this year. Send a few bucks to the challengers in these races. Their success will scare the other GOPs, and may buy us some support for the call for a special prosecutor.

Impeachment can wait.


#16

This idea of a President Pence is indeed appalling, but how could a Pence presidency be any worse than the one we have now?


#17

Precisely. Which is why the immediate task at hand is the appointment of a special prosecutor.
That is doable (see my post elsewhere).


#18

A Pence Presidency will be run as a Christian Dominionist theocracy.

The Christian Bible will overtake The Constitution as our guiding document.


#19

What Skeptic Tank said.

Plus, Pence has held office before. He's negotiated across the aisle, and he's dealt with bureaucracy, and he can work with Republican legislators. He won't offend the 'Deep State' and won't make enemies like Trump does.

In other words, he will actually get laws passed. Laws to suppress voting, laws to curtail reproductive rights... remember the Religious Freedom Restoration Act?


#20

I know this is going to piss people off a lot, so let me preface it by writing that my concern is for the sanctity of justice, not for the sanctity of Trump, if you allow yourself to believe that.

This Russia news all started when Hillary was extremely embarrassed by leaks about how her campaign was handled. Suddenly, and almost arbitrarily, she blurted out: “The Russians did it. The Russians hacked my email and gave the dirt on me to Trump's campaign.” Without any prodding, except from my familiarity with the Clintons and with their degree of perverse dishonesty, my first response was that this was total garbage, spewed to deflect charges against her, and to get revenge against Trump.

And any time the news media reported on in as if it had credibility, I already had in my mind an awareness that most of the news corporations had not only been on Hillary's side throughout the campaign, but had been actively campaigning for her.

If my first instinct was correct, and if Comey was doing a favor for friends by “investigating” fabricated charges, then firing him is not obstructing justice. Firing him is getting rid of someone who is abusing his power to a malicious end.

Let's put this in the form of an analogy. Right now, no one considers you to be a child molester. There is no evidence of it, hence there is no reason to believe it. But suppose someone who hates you for whatever reason wants to ruin your life, and they throw it out there, “He is a child molester.” Or, to avoid a claim of defamation of character, they use the Fox News tactic of posing it as a question, “Is that person a child molester?” Or putting a face on it, “Are your children safe around that person?”

This country loves, and clings to, gossip. None of us has any idea what's going on in the world except that the news media says it. Which technically is all gossip, since we have no direct access to the evidence of it.

So as soon as someone puts it out there that you are a child molester, two-thirds of people are ready to believe that you are a child molester. Some aren't so quick to judge, but even so, maybe another 25% will say, “Well, if there's a charge that he's a child molester, we should investigate.” But no, you shouldn't investigate. There should not be an investigation of every rumor that comes along, or we're all a target for having our lives destroyed because someone wants to get even with us.

Now suppose the person who suggested you are a child molester has a friend in the DA's office, and they bring an investigation against you, knowing that all there is is a rumor. If the governor steps in and fires the DA because he's misusing his position, is that obstructing justice? No.

This is a bit of a long post, so I'm leaving out my actual opinion on Trump and the Russians, or why a reasonable person might not be so quick to impeach. But this seems to be what Trump's statement on the firing is, and if he's being honest (it may come down to who are you going to believe: Donald or Hillary?) then it is not obstruction of justice.