Home | About | Donate

The EPA's New Shameful Tactic: Avoid People Poisoned by Coal Ash

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/02/08/epas-new-shameful-tactic-avoid-people-poisoned-coal-ash

2 Likes

Rump and his ilk look at everyone of us as “Expendables.”

2 Likes

Profits over people: that’s corporate capitalism to the core.

4 Likes

Of course progress at any cost .Humans have never really mattered in the name of progress.
It’s the cultural conditioning that must be challenged .
They only want to succeed but no one asks the question succeed at what !!!

4 Likes

Regulations related to the management and disposal of coal ash and related wastes, and the enforcement of those regulations, have always been lax. Also, the notification process for public hearings has always been insufficient. Virtual hearings (in addition to in-person, widely and obviously publicized - in multiple mediums, public hearings) could be helpful.

2 Likes

Or, “succeed at what cost?”

1 Like

People used to ask me, “What was it like in Nazi Germany?” I’d give them lists of books to read, films to look up." Now I can just say, “Look out the window.”
;-})

2 Likes

First of all, virtual hearings are not necessary to give access to the disabled–it’s always possible to send in a comment by snailmail or email. More to the point, closing off the ability to participate further doesn’t actually make much difference as they never listen–the permit or rule change requested by industry is always granted, or if not granted in some rare case, it’s not because of what ordinary people said at a hearing. I have participated in probably 30 public hearings, before the WV Department of Environmental Protection, the PA DEP, Office of Surface Mining and I think EPA. In some cases there was a great deal of passionate opposition, sometimes much of it well-reasoned and articulate, sometimes with a wide variety of aspects brought up. At least once, the opposition was unanimous. Nonetheless, the permits or rule changes were granted in every case. Why even bother to attend a hearing? Two reasons–because it gives you legal standing later, and we do sometimes win court cases–and because it can help with organizing, as people who attend hear others’ opinions, realize how skewed the game is, and find each other. For this reason many of these agencies have tried to change the format, even before this “virtual hearings” gambit–they announced that hearings would now be one on one, in a little room removed from the rest of the crowd. If they try to pull this, do what Bill did in Charleston–loudly ask for a show of hands on who wants the new format, versus who wants to be able to hear each other, to have a PUBLIC public hearing. You need to understand that you aren’t there to influence the government agency–they are all captured. You’re there to recruit and to polish your talking points.