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The Lasting Pain from Vietnam Silence


#1

The Lasting Pain from Vietnam Silence

Ray McGovern

Ecclesiastes says there is a time to be silent and a time to speak. The fortieth anniversary of the ugly end of the U.S. adventure in Vietnam is a time to speak – and especially of the squandered opportunities that existed earlier in the war to blow the whistle and stop the killing.

While my friend Daniel Ellsberg’s leak of the Pentagon Papers in 1971 eventually helped to end the war, Ellsberg is the first to admit that he waited too long to reveal the unconscionable deceit that brought death and injury to millions.


#2

Glad to see an almost even number of women (to men) acknowledged on this list of those insiders able to speak truth to power:

"At the time there were seven recipients of an annual award bestowed on those who exemplified Sam Adam’s courage, persistence and devotion to truth. Now, there have been 14 recipients: Coleen Rowley (2002), Katharine Gun (2003), Sibel Edmonds (2004), Craig Murray (2005), Sam Provance (2006), Frank Grevil (2007), Larry Wilkerson (2009), Julian Assange (2010), Thomas Drake (2011), Jesselyn Radack (2011), Thomas Fingar (2012), Edward Snowden (2013), Chelsea Manning (2014), William Binney (2015)."


#3

In reply to Ray whom I admire for his courage, The issue in Vietnam was not , the revelation of secret cables exposing the lies of troop numbers. The REASON for this illegal war was a lie. The fraudulent Domino Theory promoted by the evil Dulles brothers for profits as well as the lie of the Gulf of Tonkin , the immediate causus belli, were the things that should have been exposed by Ray and colleagues. JFK , if alive, would have smashed the CIA into the 'thousand pieces'. A secret govt. is antithetical to a true representative govt.. JFK gave such a speech which is why the CIA with LBJ had to 'eliminate' him.


#4

It takes a rare courage to crucify yourself for the good of your country. The adage that "the truth will set you free" has been turned on its head. Instead of imprisoning those who authorized torture the government prosecuted the man who exposed it. Barak "I'm for transparency" Obama has prosecuted more whistle blowers than all other Presidents combined.

Courage is more costly than ever.


#5

A number I saw just recently which is very interesting.

It was the CIA that shortly after the Warren Commission reports , sent out memorandums to various newspapers to use the term Conspiracy Theorist` in relation to any person who questioned the conclusions of that commission.

In a period of some 45 years PRIOR to 1967 the Washington Post and the New York times together used the word conspiracy theorist a total of 45 times.

in the 45 years after the Warren commission and that initiative they used that term 2680 times.

The CIA closely studied these memes of control since their founding.


#6

This article appeared twice in two days so I am repeating the same observation I made on the first .

This probably the first time I have read Mr McGovern issue a mea culpa for his role as an intelligence officer in Vietnam.

I have long maintained here that he WAS CIA and very likely committed some of the very crimes today's CIA commits, all of this in service to something other than the security of the peoples that live in the United States of America.

The lesson all people should take away from Mr McGovern is that in spite of the salary and the career and the excitement and the patriotism one might feel when the CIA comes a calling, one should never work for or join that criminal group of murderous thugs nor should one speak of the pride they for that service they had done for the same.

Like a Lady Macbeth that spot of blood will never be washed away.