Home | About | Donate

The Missing Link in the Gun Debate


#1

The Missing Link in the Gun Debate

Greta Zarro

America is up in arms about guns. If last month’s “March for Our Lives,” which attracted over one million marchers nationwide, is any indication, we’ve got a serious problem with gun violence, and people are fired up about it.


#2

Hollywood is approached to make a movie. Hollywood is promised lavish access to the US Military and its inner workings. A Normal citizen taking pictures of what Hollywood is provided by the Pentagon would be arrested as a suspect terrorist. People have been arrested with regularity in the USA for taking pictures of a Military base or asset. Hollywood runs the final product by the US Military and the US Military proposes changes to ensure the US Military portrayed in a positive light.

The US Military pays professional sports teams fees to have “Honor the Veterans days” and will do flyovers at football games to garner ooo’s and ahhs. The US Military, in spite of the war crimes it has committed the World over, the millions it has left dead, the pollution as one of the worlds largest polluters (and pollutants of the most insidous kind) and literally trillions of dollars lavished on it as people go hungry and homeless remains one of the most “Respected” institutions in the uSA.

It is corrupt to the core yet is all but worshipped. The people have been carefully taught using the propaganda techniques of Bernays and Goebells. It where mindless patriotism leads and has led to the US being the most Militarized country on the globe.


#3

In a nutshell Zarro 's article describes the morphing of the military industrial complex (MIC) (that Eisenhower warned us about as he left the White House in January 1961) into the 21st century’s military industrial media infotainment complex (MIMIC).

During the Viet Nam era students at my San Francisco area high school succeeded in keeping JROTC out of my high school by striking. I always felt sorry for kids who didn’t live in an area experiencing critical mass against the Viet Nam occupation (you were never more than a mile from the nearest draft counselor in the SF Bay Area during that era). They grew up in a brainwashing environment that few have been able to shake.


#4

There is not one single congressperson in D.C. who advocates for cutting the military budget, closing military bases around the world or ending our disastrous invasion and occupation of ME countries. Yet none can point to a single plane, warship, sub, tank or standing army that any of the various terrorist groups possess. A rag-tag assemblage of murky ‘terrorists’ makes the old cold war propaganda seem quaint. Bin Laden (or whoever) couldn’t have imagined this type of success would be accomplished with 19 box cutters.

I suspect even the most reasonable of elected federal officials (yes, you too Bernie) realize how embedded our economical well-being is vested in the military. The strategy of spreading military monies to all fifty states is common knowledge. Applying the brakes to that gravy train would be deeply felt across the country. And keep in mind the big U.S. weapons contractors not only supply our war machine but others throughout the world. The profits collected from these mostly contrived conflicts are beyond comprehension.

What we need is a vision/philosophy of an economy to supplant the current zeitgeist of paranoia and bravado. It’s being done in the energy sectors with various power alternatives and other sustainable ways to live. The military coup in Washington and among the majority of citizens is so complete that unending war and occupation in the ME and elsewhere is not even a topic of discussion during the vast majority of elections - on any level. We’ve accepted the fact that half of every discretionary dollar go to the national security state. It’s manufactured consent taken to an unthinkable, ever-deadly and impoverishing level.


#5

Nobody wants the MIC budget drastically reduced more than me, and I believe the statistics in the article, but were still not asking the right questions surrounding these tragedies.
What is making so many people decide to kill other human beings.
We’ve had ROTC programs for years,
We’ve had war movies for years (I’ll admit they are more graphic),
We’ve been militarizing the police since Nixon.
The only new item is video games.
Not until the last 20 yrs. have we seen this dramatic increase in mass murder.
I’m not advocating for any of these items, and maybe it’s an accumulative effect, none of us knows.
This subject is to important to guess at the answer, we need experts in human behavior to really study this and provide us with answers, so we make the right decisions to correct the problem.


#6

What good is voting, unless the election is completely validated? The populace must choose ban alternative. The only legitimate function of government, is the protection of the individual’s right to tend to their own needs.

As for your idea of an economy to replace the existing one, yes, that is what it will take. Govzilla depends on our cooperation. If the populace were to stop cooperating, govzilla would die. They need us. We don’t need govzilla. Every dollar you don’t use is a nail in the coffin.


#7

Finally an article discussing the systemic connections between all these obvious factions in the society. Except for Democracy Now, that mentioned (although not in a critical way) the JROTC membership of the Florida shooter, most media stayed out of it. As they consistently and religiously stay out of the discourse about a militarized society - in every facet of it. One of course does not expect Congress to raise the issue - but the media?


#8

Congress and MOST media are owned by Wall Street and Wall Street profits handsomely from all things military, in the US and abroad.

Eternal occupations and wars equal eternal revenue for Wall Street’s military industrial media infotainment complex (MIMIC). Any Congresscritter opposing MIMIC will find Wall Street making them " an offer they can’t refuse" to quote Marlon Brando in 1972’s Godfather.


#9

I speculate ROTC mainly advance-trains young citizens to be willing and orderly soldiers - and, short of military enlistment, to accept military spending and military ‘solutions.’

Maybe the ROTC-trained are better workers too…or more obedient workers? At any rate, more desirable in the eyes of employers - ‘ROTC? OK, they’ll be good at following orders…’

As to those that enlist: in an economy that offers undignified, low-paying, unstable work to a lot of people, a job with steady pay, housing, decent schools, decent healthcare + pension probably looks half-way good - even if it may mean killing other people and getting killed…making it easier to think of military spending as ‘necessary,’ the people you kill as ‘deserving enemies’ and your own risks as ‘noble self-sacrifice.’

I don’t know…the higher number of mass killers with military backgrounds? May be those psychologically and socially maimed by militarization…or may be those psychologically and socially maimed by America: who return to the social/economic shittiness of the U.S. with a ‘vocation’ that gives them a means to take out their anger at normal social life…on innocents and - since it typically ends in suicide - on themselves.


#10

I don’t pretend it’s your answer, but look at our language: Even my solitaire app congratulates me on 1 of about 10 wins with “Ouch! You crushed it!” and on another with an animation (made of card images) of two swords banging at each other. “Killer” is the latest highest praise.

Even if nothing else were to come of the leadership of the Parkland kids, I will take note and heart that I do not hear this violence language from them (and I watched the March for Our Lives virtually uninterrupted, salving my disappointment at not being able to attend). This despite the two victims of the shooting who were also JROTC being given medals by the Army, and the dead one a posthumous admission to West Point, and yes, while nothing was being said about Cruz’s time in JROTC.

I also must add to Zarro’s excellent article that it starts long before JROTC. I’ve observed a baby boy decked out in camo. And where can you get away from camo? We promote the notion of unmotivated evil in our entertainment, and savior figures to vanquish it. In my religious community it is indeed being called warrior worship and idolatry. And as is said of taking care of veterans, I want to get over warrior worship by not making any more of them.

(I became radicalized, though a bit too late, during Viet Nam. I raised 2 children identified male, who chose to go with me to protest 41’s ME war, and then watched as they defaced their draft-registration cards and one held a military recruiter at bay at our front door. At. the. damn. door, after multiple phone calls. And then mailed the jerk a packet of poetry, suggesting it might explain why he didn’t really want this child of mine.)


#12

Dear Recon thank for your most apt post. The answer to the increase in mass murders lies somewhere in the next to last paragraph

When in the history of humans has there been a war free period ? Yes we are now in the grips of total militarization and paranoia. Keeping the world unstable creates the fear that governments need to control the masses. This country is in deep do-do and few people with the means/wherewithal are willing to fix the problems. A capitalist society is devoid of consideration for the common good. The public of today have little concept of the common good.
How can we turn against the inappropriate use of world militarism by the Us when the best options for many of todays youth is working in the military which offers job security, medical coverage for life and after twenty years a full pension. Is the collection of grass root movements enough to loosen the grip of the wealthy and their propaganda agenda? Can we take back our schools, our local governments, utilities, mineral resources, waterways ? Can corporations be regulated to limit pollution of the planet and our airways? Can banks be regulated to avoid additional financial meltdowns?

If on the local level there are candidates who we can hold to their campaign message then we will be the leaders that are needed for the changes. In Az for the first time in ages there a candidate for senate whose stated focus includes some of the above change. Teachers striking against the demise of public education is also a favorable beginning. This is not the time to cease to fight the powers which are destroying our world.


#13

Martin Luther King Jr. said it all when he declared:
"Our only hope today lies in our ability to recapture the revolutionary spirit and go out into a sometimes hostile world declaring eternal hostility to poverty, racism, and militarism. With this powerful commitment we shall boldly challenge the status quo and unjust mores, and thereby speed the day when "every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low, and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain."3

A genuine revolution of values means in the final analysis that our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Every nation must now develop an overriding loyalty to mankind as a whole in order to preserve the best in their individual societies…

We are now faced with the fact, my friends, that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked, and dejected with a lost opportunity. The tide in the affairs of men does not remain at flood – it ebbs. We may cry out desperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is adamant to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residues of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words, “Too late.” There is an invisible book of life that faithfully records our vigilance or our neglect. Omar Khayyam is right: “The moving finger writes, and having writ moves on.”


#14

Not so. According to Gary Null, more than 90% of mass shooters have been on one or more legally-prescribed psychiatric meds at the time. The liability issue could be why this goes largely unremarked.


#15

I apologize if you interpreted my post to think I am pro ROTC, or any of the other points I brought up, I am not. My problem is most of these types of articles are calling for a knee jerk reaction to this serious problem we have in this country. I just want to focus on the real problem, people killing other people, using science to identify it, and produce a long term solution. Eliminating any of those points until we know that it is the culprit, is basically putting a band-aid on the wound.


#16

The point of my post has escaped you I believe (I don’t say this to be condescending). You’re opinion, if I understand correctly, is militarization pointed at our youth is the problem. You could be correct, or not. We don’t really know, but we need to find the answer. I’m not pro ROTC programs, but I look back to the 1950’s and see we had these programs without mass killings. That leads me to believe it’s not the culprit, but again I don’t know for sure. For all we know, and it’s not much on this subject, it could be something the author and myself hasn’t identified. My position is we need to identify the problem and fix it, soon. If I’ve misstated you’re position, I apologize.


#17

You’re correct, I have made a mistake. The line should read “the only new item I can think of is video games”. The point you bring up could very well be the answer. There are probably hundreds of other items I over looked that could have influence on this topic as well. Please read my response to other posters on this subject to understand my meaning on this subject. Thanks.


#18

“A capitalist society is devoid of consideration for the common good. The public of today have little concept of the common good.”

My opinion is that the populace lacks respect for one another and see violence as a solution. Please find the time to read what I have written.


#19

I did not address the ROTC specifically. It seems to me that your main question is
“Not until the last 20 yrs. have we seen this dramatic increase in mass murder.”
followed by
“I’m not advocating for any of these items, and maybe it’s an accumulative effect, none of us knows.”
Well sure propaganda toward selling WARS and Militarization of Police do have a cumulative effect. Plus the gross income inequality and the propaganda selling hate along with the fear of political and economic refugees which have resulted from the numerous wars and climate disasters.

It is important to never underestimate the power of propaganda especially in this climate of controlled media. Equally important those of us who can and care to must be informed and attempt to dissuade our friends and family about the lies being forced upon the public.

And I repeat that what is fuelling the increase of violence is lack of emphasis on the common good in the capitalistic society which is run and paid for by the war economy and its wealthy leaders.


#22

Way to so totally miss the entire point.


#23

I agree whole heartedly with the suggestion that the US Governmnet (and others) , create false flag events. It ridiculous to believe otherwise as there a litany of them from history demonstrable as fact. That said I am a bit more wary about declaring EVERY attack a “false flag” as this is exactly what the deep state would want to promote. What happens here is when one of those charges “debunked” , the perception is that all such charges of false flags has been debunked.

The problem is sifting through the information and trying to seperate fac from fiction.