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The Most Important Election of Your Life (Is Not This Year)


#1

The Most Important Election of Your Life (Is Not This Year)

John Feffer

The voters vowed to take their revenge at the polls. They’d missed out on the country’s vaunted prosperity. They were disgusted with the liberal direction of the previous administration. They were anti-abortion and pro-religion. They were suspicious of immigrants, haughty intellectuals, and intrusive international institutions. And they very much wanted to make their nation great again.

They’d lost a lot of elections. But this time, they won.

In Poland, that is.


#2

Republicans represent the 0.01%.

Democrats represent the 0.01 - 1.00% that are fighting to get some of the 0.01%'s money.

Both make whatever arguments they may to win the 99%.

In other words, business as usual.


#3

Agreed, it may not be the most important election of our lives. And the election may not even be the most important decision before us this year. But finding a way to salvage our democracy, our economy and our environment absolutely IS a challenge we must face today.


#4

Weird to read an article that includes the extreme right wing in America yet not a word about the violent neocon foreign policy so popular with the Democratic Party these days.


#5

It was an article about the mood of the US working class. Working-class white (and a most black) USAns across the spectrum and in every region have always strongly supported US militarism, unfortunately. - Hillary's foreign policy positions are one of the few things the working class might agree with her on.


#6

One thing I don't understand is that if the attractiveness of Trump was about the economically precarious working class, then why are not Black and Latino USAns - the most precarious of the precarious class - not Trump supporters? Most of the white working class in the region of the small-formerly-mill-and-mining-towns my region - the backbone of Trump's support - do not look that poor - they all have nice houses, late model pickup-trucks, and a "quad" for every family member which they spend the weekends tearing and polluting-up the woods.

The conflict between "America A" (ethnically/racially diverse urban) and "America B" (white small town, rust belt, rural) seems to be more cultural than economic. Because one see much more poverty (along with the wealth) in my city than the adjoining Appalachian areas. I go down to West Virginia and western Pennsylvania/Maryland all the time and I haven't seen any kind dilapidated shack like the Appalachians used to be known for in a long time. I sure see a lot of dilapidated houses right in my own city neighborhood though.


#7

I wonder if the author has considered America A's prosperity was linked to America B's decline. In other words, was the destroying of the middle class a major part of the creation of a huge income and wealth disparity in America? ie, the creation of the 99%? I suspect it is.


#8

"Black and Latino USAns" I believe it's because they see him as a big time racist. Now, if Trump was say black, and wasn't talking racism, then I think it would be different.


#11

America A includes much more than just the very wealthy. It includes everyone in urban areas - the quintessential American-A would be the PBR-drinking artsy-fartsy-urban hipster - and they are usually a lot poorer than most America B types.


#12

Terrific metaphorical characterization on Trump:

"He’s the electoral equivalent of a day at the firing range, a way of blowing off political steam."

I think the following quote contradicts itself. Another way of making my point is that IF the unemployment numbers were really anything NEAR to 5%... there would not be all those angry white guys frustrated with lousy wages and a Jobs Desert:

"At a time when the American economy is growing at a respectable pace and the unemployment rate is below 5% for the first time since 2008, America B has not benefitted from the prosperity."

With all due respect, Mr. Feffer: You're WAY too smart to accept this Official Story Statistic. It's far from accurate.

THIS is very true and why I've posted that Trump mostly attracts angry white guys... which is not the same thing as "Americans" or "We."

"Above all, the inhabitants of America B are angry. They’re disgusted with politics as usual in Washington and the hypocritical, sanctimonious political elite that goes with it. They’re incensed by how the wealthy have effectively seceded from American society with their gated estates and offshore accounts. And they’ve focused their resentment on those they see as having taken their jobs: immigrants, people of color, women. They’re so desperate for someone who “tells it like it is” that they’ll look the other way when it comes to Donald Trump’s inextricable links to the very elite who did so much to widen the gap between the two Americas in the first place."

Great closing arguments, Mr. Feffer, in paragraphs 1-4.

Your reasoning is far more nuanced than the vast majority of political analysts.


#14

If humanity passes through this karmic gauntlet (a/k/a Transition Period) and can thereby look back and study history, it will find in this election a prism of every projected prejudice under the sun.

On C.D. there's a small group that has made African American voters into the problem.

A few others have cast their prism upon older voters, and held them accountable for Sanders not winning.

Still others blame women and those who identify with Hillary on behalf of gender.

Here's Mr. Feffer's equally narrow prism weighing in on the Sanders' phenomenon:

"Falling behind economically and feeling betrayed by politicians on both sides of the aisle, America B might have moved to the left if the United States had a strong socialist tradition. In the 2016 primary campaign, many of the economically anxious did, in fact, support Bernie Sanders, particularly the younger offspring of America A fearful of being deported to America B. Unlike Europe B, however, America B has always been more about rugged individualism than class solidarity. Its denizens would rather buy a lottery ticket and pray for a big payout than rely on a handout from Washington (Medicare and Social Security aside). Donald Trump, politically speaking, is their Powerball ticket."

I have two responses.

First, it is precisely this "search for a target to blame" syndrome that takes the collective focus off of where it justifiably belongs.

Two, where the focus belongs is on those elites who used all manner of fabrication, faux voting numbers, and assorted fallacies to produce the already agreed upon outcome in the same way that Neo-Cons pushed a case that was already FIXED FOR war (and that war was an all-out War of Aggression--i.e. The Supreme Crime against Humanity).

Instead of casting about for why "this specific group" didn't produce enough votes for Sanders, or why "that group" followed suit, attention MUST be placed on those who controlled the metrics by limiting voter access, not just publishing but also endlessly repeating completely erroneous "news" stories; and then having the fail-safe system of "the super delegates" to provide the 1% ruling class with the outcome they desired... after a very expensive and largely farcical display of "Democracy" in the form of an election run-up whose results were foreclosed upon before the great farce began.

Studying how ants behave within a closed cage is different than opening up the cage... to thereby invite and discovery far more refreshing results!

About 10 days ago I used an analogy that went right past the poster it was aimed at. He was still arguing the various demographic numbers when I pointed out that IF there was a leak in a dam, it didn't matter how much water was poured in.

I wonder who can read this metaphor for what it's critiquing about the recent election run-up as mock-up of Democracy?


#15

Seriously?

Guess you have been tone-deaf about the Republicans' insistence that Hispanics be hurled back over the border. That's GOT to make Latinos feel grand!

And how about the South's history on racism and the endurance of "the Klan"?

Few Black citizens would trust Republicans to do anything BUT turn back the clock to a time wherein lynching was the norm. And unlike white citizens who are better positioned to take the gamble, Blacks can't afford the rise of right wing armies. That's why, even if some heard about Sanders or received a true and accurate depiction of his actual policies, Blacks might be more reluctant to "throw their vote away" or "give the nation to Trump."

Hillary seems like their only half-way safe oasis in a desert of clear and ominous daily dangers.

What's a matter... nothing for "the engineer" to do in the office today?


#16

That's exactly what I saw in this article. Not a word about the Democrats neoliberal and neocon factions.


#17

That's because of the large number of military supply corporations spread across the US.

If these corporations closed down, unemployment would skyrocket. So their workers always support a fat military budget in order to save their jobs.

It's a very clever trap to ensure worker's support for warfare, laid by the MIC.


#19

The whole Party System ESTABLISHMENT has become so corrupt, it's difficult to say if it can be saved. It is "We the People" who will have to find a better way to set a foundation for a new approach to democracy, while at the same time fighting away the poisonous TPP, TTIP and TISA designed by Obama and the CABAL he serves, as the last steps towards the NWO they have planned for generations. THE END OF THE SELF-RULE EXPERIMENT (DEMOCRACY) IS ABOUT TO TAKE PLACE, UNLESS WE GET RID OF THESE DEVASTATING FALSE "TRADE DEALS" DESIGNED TO PERPETUATE THE ENSLAVEMENT WITH FUTURE GOVERNMENTS.


#20


THE US TRUE POLITICAL ESTABLISHMENT, having a big laugh at The Sheeply People's expense.
DON'T VOTE FOR ANY OF THE PARTY ESTABLISHMENT CANDIDATES, Killary is a criminal.


#21

My father's WW-II, white male generation were mostly FDR, New Deal democrats who returned from the war and had good GI Bill benefits to launch their good paying, union, blue collar factory jobs. Almost to a one, they flipped to Republican during the 60's, after the anti-war, civil-rights, feminist, and LGBT movements made significant gains into the culture. So about the only jobs left in any number for the non-college white males are construction (now, with stiff competition from Latino/Hispanics) and truck driving. The Dems wrote them off, and the Repub establishment thought they had them in the bag forever. So in this cycle of anti-establishment sentiment, the anti-establishment Trump (whether true or not) has a fighting chance against Hillary and the establishment Dems -- especially after the Dem preliminary platform committee decided to back the TPP, big oil, Wall Street, etc.