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The No. 1 Cause of Climate Change the Media Don’t Mention


#1

The No. 1 Cause of Climate Change the Media Don’t Mention

Lee Camp

There are many issues the corporate media will debate in its standard, convoluted, manipulative manner. In fact, most issues will at some point get an hour of glowing fame on the mind-control box. Yet some topics are forbidden, banned from discussion on the mainstream news channels.


#2

Evinces the usual comic’s penchant for cheap vulgarity, but otherwise on the mark.


#3

And here I thought the article was going to be about overpopulation. THAT is the cause that the media shies away from.

As for eating meat, humans have been omnivores since they climbed down from the trees.


#4

Man (sic) learned to eat animals by watching animals eat other animals. Eventually we’re all food for something else.

With that said, corporate farming is to farming as corporate culture is to culture.


#5

I agree. We could however keep some chickens in our back yard, maybe raise a pig every year for slaughter and use the manure for a kitchen garden…ensuring that we at least ate well knowing where much of our food came from. It would probably take about 2 hours a day to do this.
That’s more trouble than most of us want; it would change lifestyles, though.


#6

Mr Camp has a good point: Humans constitute 36% of land mammals on Earth by weight; livestock 60% and wildlife 4%.


#7

It’s both- and much more. Meat eating means that animals take up grazing room on land also.


#8

How about being a vegan?


#10

Deep. How on earth did all those well meaning vegans, environmentalists, ethical theorists, and ethologists miss such an obvious point! The flesh-chomping world owes you a great debt of gratitude.


#12

The fact that mankind has eaten meat throughout history doesn’t excuse the fact that animals on factory farms live lives of constant suffering, something all meat eaters would never tolerate with their pets.
It is only by an act of inner mental denial, that meat eaters can enjoy their diet.
I’ve noticed that when I want to show a meat eater videos of the conditions of the animals they are eating, on factory farms, they refuse to watch.


#13

Exactly, Dolgen. Apologists for the “humans are omnivores” stance conveniently ignore the difference between subsistence hunting/gathering and the hellish conditions of factory farming. And as Lee Camp points out, these days perfectly nutritious alternatives are easily come by. It’s not so difficult to change diet habits when you’re motivated.
I do agree with WWSmith though, that overpopulation is another key topic that is kryptonite for the msm, and even the alternative media to a large extent. When you add meat-eating habits to the grotesquely large human population, you get very bad news for the planet.


#14

OMG!!!I LOVED IT …For some reason. Well I had my reasons… but …I quit eating red meat in 1977…and quit chicken in 1980…I still do eat fish…but …usually once a week… was even less for a good few years… my reasons were. Well let us just say philosophical. Yeah…


#15

Not to devalue you statements on the vile living conditions of factory farms but the enormous amount of concentrated waste resulting from the feed lots and all Concentrated Agricultural Farms is equally important to discuss. The methane released into the atmosphere is a huge factor in the rising temperatures of the planet. Plus the manure lagoons seep into ground and surface waterways including people’s wells


#16

If we didn’t have the overpopulation, we wouldn’t need the factory farms. I almost hate to use the phrase but its a “chicken and egg” thing…


#17

I agree with you wholeheartedly, that overpopulation is a huge problem.
But, to me, that is a separate issue from animal cruelty.
If we humans were honest with ourselves, and consistent in our thinking, we’d all make a big effort to not eat animals that were tortured all their lives.
There are few things I am certain about, few things in which I cannot see other arguments as having some validity. But there is no valid argument, in my opinion, in favor of eating, and supporting the torture of, our fellow animals.


#18

I’ve been looking for a shelf-stable protein source that doesn’t really need much cooking. Beans are not the answer. Dried meat is not the answer. However, insects are. So, a couple weeks ago I finally decided to jump in and get some insects produced for human consumption. (I’m still waiting on getting the shipment delivered.)
How do I plan on using them? While I’m boiling my grits, toss a handful in the pot- dinner is served. Cook time: 5 minutes. How much more convenient can a food be? So, basically I plan on cooking them with whatever grain I plan on having for dinner. One pot meals is what I like. I can see how insects can meet the demands of humans’ busy modern lifestyle.


#19

AMEN!!!

Probably long before, actually.  There are lots of edible critturs living in trees . . .

Correct on all counts — with or without my insertions.

A back yard?  What’s that??   What percentage of the seven-times-too-big population of the earth even HAS a back yard, or enough extra food on hand to feed some chickens, much less a pig or even a goat???


#20

Just right. That’s why habituated meat-eaters constantly invoke the same old, tired cliches in an hopeless defense of at least some level of animal consumption (“we’re by nature omnivores” "I don’t support gratuitous suffering found in factory farms, but…“Well, it’s eat or be eaten” “But what about the plants” etc. etc.). The case for veganism is simple, really, and there’s no even marginally convincing rebuttal:

  1. Taking the life of (or significantly harming) a nonhuman sentient being is prima facie wrong (wrong in the absence of a morally – not culturally, personally, or traditionally – compelling reason to do so).
  2. The human consumption of nonhuman sentient animals is entirely unnecessary.
    Therefore, 3. The human consumption of these sentient nonhumans is wrong.

It’s sad that (most) progressive are so beholden to the status quo in this regard that they can’t see that the consumption of these animals is flies in the face of every humanitarian, progressive, or thoughtful position they normally embrace.


#21

Huge corporate “farming” operations, especially confinement meat and egg production, always produces exponential tons of waste - manure, fuel, and especially water. John Robbins, of the Baskin-Robbins family, left the family biz decades ago, and has been a vegan cheerleader and author for years. He did and ad years ago, which illustrated the amount(s) of waste involved in meat production, and it’s still scary. Lee Camp is correct - meat eaters just need to cut back their consumption/demand for products, and simplify their menus. Humans are omnivores, and a meat-centered diet, when based on mega farms putting out additive-laced meats, is dangerous.


#22

For close to a decade we have had the technology to 3d print edible foods, including a variety of meat substitutes.
Hell, we can even 3d print a fully functional human organ, how much of a challenge can a decent pork chop be?
There is simply no sane excuse for allowing the omnicidal practice of industrial scale animal agriculture when such a technology exists.