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The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here


#1

The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here

Eric Holthaus, Rolling Stone

Historians may look to 2015 as the year when shit really started hitting the fan. Some snapshots: In just the past few months, record-setting heat waves in Pakistan and India each killed more than 1,000 people. In Washington state's Olympic National Park, the rainforest caught fire for the first time in living memory. London reached 98 degrees Fahrenheit during the hottest July day ever recorded in the U.K.; The Guardian briefly had to pause its live blog of the heat wave because its computer servers overheated.


#2

It scares me to think that I've been an optimist about the climate all these years while people were telling me that I was a doom and gloomer. Turns out my worst doom and gloom painted a much rosier picture than what we actually face in reality.


#4

This sounds like the California governor asking for a reduction in domestic water usage rates. Fine. But 80% of the problem comes from Big Agriculture and Fracking.

In the past, I advocated a usage score card as a means of reducing each person's carbon footprint.

Industrial agriculture and the Meat "Industry" are huge climate change contributors. So is the MIC moving its massive armies to "hostile territory" added to tons of heavy equipment requiring fuel, too.

If the ratio is citizens 20% to MIC/Big Farming/Fracking 80%... then focus on the habits of each individual is minute in terms of efficient outcomes.

This is about govt. beholden to the MIC and Big Energy and Big Agriculture. Meat eating is pushed by Fast Food ads. Our ancestors ate far less meat. And it's making Western citizens fat, Diabetic, and Depressed... not to mention contributing to an epidemic of Cancers.

That habit could and should change... tout suite. But larger INSTITUTIONAL changes must come from bodies that wield power.


#5

I'm big on progress (call me a progressive lol) any progress is better than no progress.

Millions of rooftop solar panels? Some complain that won't be enough. No it won't but it is progress.

A carbon tax? Some complain that won't be enough. Maybe not but it is a big f'k'n step compared to what we've got now and it is progress.

Put those two things together and it is a lot of progress when you think about it. That's how progress works - step by step - it keeps getting better.


#7

I don't have a smart phone and don't want one .


#8

Maybe not. But you obviously use a computer.


#9

Sorry, but the indigenes across the planet were quite happy to eat everything on sight and to use fire to burn off forest for hunting etc etc which certainly did change local ecosystems and in Australia, contributed to change in the continental ecosystem. The ONLY difference is that we indigenes use bigger and ecologically more violent tools than did our stone-age ancestors.


#12

I has some seismic coordinator come by my place (more than once) to get permission to blast away on my property looking for the deep Niagra Oil Formation- I toyed around with some questions and knew he was lieing when he denied it was all about Oil and not fracking for gas- Oil had been discovered and all drilled out decades ago-
He offered several hundred dollars for my signature, and I really could have used the money, but I told him that gas/oil needs to stay in the ground, so hit the road Jack-
I feel good about this, but it looks like nearly every pixel on that sheet of his has been signed off for seismic and there were thousands of them....I guess these folks either didn't see "Gas Land" or they are just plain ignorant and blindly greedy..And as is par for the course, countless others will pay for their bad decisions-


#14

One poster on this thread has said that large scale institutional must come from bodies that wield power. The assumption that individual changes in lifestyle habits such as a decision to change to vegitatarian or vegan eating habits cannot possibly percolate up from people quickly enough to make a difference, and cannot happen with propagandistic urgings to continue consuming the output of the agribusiness meat industry continuing apace. The chemically fertilized and other tinkered with consumable plants are in about as bad shape.

But these "bodies" that wield power are human bodies. People with bodies in business of industrialized food are fighting back furiously to keep people from the realization -- dawning but probably too slowly -- that every body will at some point will become acutely aware of probably terminal changes that are being perpetrated on us and the entire global life support system.

The diagnosis has been made but treatment options have yet to appear that can overcome the widespread disease of denial.


#16

We are animals.

Some will take this as a negative statement because of our illusion of superiority and separation from the other animals.

But we ARE members of the animal kingdom and it's the lack of recognizing this relationship that has always been key to our failures.

I wonder, as we continue to head towards extinction, if the last humans will still cling with religious blindness to the belief in the superiority of the "wonderful" human mind and its destructive ego gone wild.


#17

Well, having lived with indigenes living as indigenes, I disagree.
The Tasmanian aborigines burnt extensive tracts of forest both for access for migration routes and hunting.
The Australian eucalypt forests, according to the pollen record, flourished suddenly around 20 000 years ago, coinciding with the commencment of use of fire for hunting.
In the USA someone ate the camels, and it wasn't the horses, which also got eaten out, possibly by either sabre-tooth tigers or the good folk who wiped out the sabre-toothed tigers.
We indigenes in Europe were also quite effective at knocking off species using stone tools (which we mined from 100 feet deep in the Chalk beds among other places, using deer antlers) and we got even better at it after we had invented gunpowder.
When one wanders through the indigenous rain-forests of Papua New Guinea, one is amazed by the silence. The birds have been eaten, as have their eggs, and it is not nasty money-grubbing capitalist Malaysian/Japanese/Korean/Chinese/Taiwanese loggers who are responsible.Nor was it we sweet and mild Europeans.Nor is it because of cats. It is because of the indigenes who happily kill and eat anything that is protein whenever they find it.

Dogs are animals. Ever seen a dog ripping up a flock of sheep for fun? They do that. And they are not alone in that kind of activity.

This hippy preoccupation with the noble savage living in "harmony" with nature is nonsense. It was nature doing the harmonising, brutally, via disease and death in childbirth and famine, which no doubt even the indigenes would have preferred to do without, not to mention warfare. Which is why some indigenes, once they had the achieved critical mass necessary for the development of ideas merely beyond where lay the next waterhole, started building civilisations and making tools to ease the burden of being harmonised by nature and in order to better kill their neighbours who would otherwise steal their territory and women.

The problem with us/our civilisation is that we don't use our brains for the social good, and never have.Those who try to do so usually get crucified.


#18

"The ONLY difference is that we indigenes use bigger and ecologically more violent tools than did our stone-age ancestors."

That's because bigger and ecologically more violent tools weren't available for use by our stone-age ancestors.


#19

If this year's hellish winter here in Bay State is an indication, we've already started living it, if one gets the drift.


#20

Very true. And we indigenes are around because our Stone-Age ancestors went forth to multiply to the point where they eventually built a civilisation which accumulated knowledge and skill and ever more complex tools and eventually became us.

I am sure that if I went back in time and in my time machine picked up a Stone-Age hunter with his knee ripped open by falling on a stone when hunting in the primaeval forest, and brought him and his swollen pus-oozing knee back to a modern hospital where he could have antibiotics to stop his septicaemia and have a skilled surgeon stitch his tendons back together so he could once again use his leg, he would be very happy.

As he was.

The other choice would have been for him to have been harmonised by nature to a rotting corpse, painfully, during around 3 weeks of ever increasing septicaemic misery. I doubt if he, or his relatives, would have chosen that.They didn't.


#21

So was the use of flint to strike a spark to light a fire.


#23

You have made a very important point, Humans are animals and the sooner we admit and acknowledge it, we will continue to delude ourselves into thinking we are superior to all the other animal species.


#25

My friend ...it is obvious that you are too young (after all these decades) to listen to such crap, as am I. You know what could happen with hanging out with the wrong crowd. Change the damn channel!!! Lol


#27

Don't make things so catholic! I am using the proper sense of the term not the religious. You can see the catholic Church as being catholic but you can't apply that overly broad generalization to sections of society that contain many diverse members.

Yes many conservatives may be anti-abortion but that hypocrisy of theirs ignores poor children and rape etc.. There was and is an authoritarian paternalism and anti-sexuality aspect that is pure hypocrisy like Limbaugh railing against drug use while he was a hard core drug addict.

Many progressives do not agree with abortion by the way and I am surprised that you ignore that since many progressive priests and nuns, pastors and rabbis etc are progressive but hold religious prohibitions against abortion as well.

How do you reconcile Pope Francis's open arms approach to inter faith principles and tolerance for people Limbaugh and his ilk castigate? The very people that Christ associated with are denigrated and reviled by Limbaugh and Savage etc.

If you wish progressive Catholic views they aren't hard to find but you won't find them where you find Limbaugh. Limbaugh is a deceiver plain and simple. Most progressives respect other people's beliefs and positions and the nonsense that passes for intelligent discourse in forums is something else again.

Nevertheless if you listen to lies then they start to sound like they are true. That is how people get trapped into cults. They begin to believe what they are hearing day after day.

Hold to your beliefs and positions on your own and don't allow yourself to be manipulated by deceivers. The truth is a guide not a lie.

There is that one issue that conservatives make much of. They also tried to prohibit the morning after contraception pill (plan B) too. They are those that would have others never use condoms or contraceptives of any kind. Both you and I know that catholics use them as much as do anybody else.

Aside from that issue what do Conservatives say that ties in with Catholic teaching? Limbaugh lost no time railing against Pope Francis nor did Savage. They are deceivers and Christ would not know them. Think about who you listen to and how they feel towards the Pope because of his encyclical.


#29

You misunderstood, my friend. The word catholic refers to all -to a wide range of things - the word as used when it doesn't refer to catholicism. I thought I was being punny but ...lol.

I was asking you not to be so catholic in the sense of including everybody under one roof - one label. It had nothing to do with the Catholic Church at all. The word has a specific meaning (i'm not explaining this well but look in a dictionary and then you'll see what I meant.

In other words, don't expect one all encompassing attitude about all issues for progressives or conservatives.


#31

You're still too young to be listening to Limbaugh and the other hoodlums! wink