Home | About | Donate

The Pre-Charge Punishment of Julian Assange


#1

The Pre-Charge Punishment of Julian Assange

Amy Goodman

Tucked away on a side street in one of London’s toniest neighborhoods, just across the street from the sprawling department store Harrods, sits a brick, Victorian-era apartment building that houses the Ecuadorean Embassy. Julian Assange, the founder and editor of the whistle-blower website WikiLeaks, walked into this embassy on June 19, 2012, and hasn’t stepped foot outside since.


#2

Thank you, Amy, for this interview. I believe that without WikiLeaks, citizens in the nations about to be impacted (a/k/a fleeced) by the TPP and TIPP would not know much of the content (and its overall intent) kept secret from the public.

The elites want public knowledge to exclusively consist of what they tell citizens via all sorts of PR, fabricated stories, and Official Narratives. The lockdown on Truth tellers is part of the calculus.

Thank you Julian Assange for your commitment to getting the Truth out there. And make sure you take lots of Vitamin D to make up for that missing sunlight.


#3

"Vice President Joe Biden called Assange a “high-tech terrorist..."

Please, anyone, correct me if I'm wrong or exaggerating;

After the US allied with nazis to overthrow the corrupt yet young democracy of Ukraine, Joe Biden's son and John Kerry's relative-in-law became members of the board of some kind of fracking company in Ukraine.

Additionally, the US sponsored war in Ukraine is distracting the world from assisting with controlling Chernobyl, in Ukraine ... And ... Chernobyl is a real world problem that evil Russia was helping Ukraine figure out for the benefit of all humans on Earth.

Finally; Julian Assange is a world class hero far beyond the measure of any sniveling war monger US politician, general, corporatist pirate or spy.


#4

Perhaps Joe Biden has redefined "terrorist" to mean SOMEBODY WHO CREATES DISCOMFORT FOR TERRORISTS WHO DENY THEY ARE TERRORISTS.


#5

Julian Assange is a true hero in letting us know what is really going on. Very very scarey people, those in power who are the real traitors to democracy, to any remote sense of decency. I had two uncles who served in WW II who would find it appalling to have fought against fascism and genocide only to have it rearing its ugly head again under the guise of democracy and "defense." Do these people who decry real freedom fighters ever look in the mirror, or ever look into the faces of their children and grandchildren and care what kind of a world they are contributing to? Democracy requires a free press, and since we do not have one, it is essential that people like Julian Assange and people like Amy Goodman keep us informed.


#6

And I call Joe Biden a first-class assh@@e. He is and always has been.


#7

Wikileaks has become so high profile while, at the same time, so demonized by the powers-that-be, I suggest Assange and the likes of Amy G. would do us all well to stress from time to time that, properly speaking, Wikileaks is no more than a medium, and not in itself the message. The message/s originate/s in fact with individuals, most of them motivated by a more or less righteous sense of indignation toward governmental abuses & injustices to which they have been privy. And it seems to me Assange could deflect a load of the animus directed at his own person by employing this as a 'disclaimer' and as a kind of shibboleth, more or less constantly.


#8

The pre-charge punishment of Assange parallels similar treatment meted out to many ordinary people in the United States. Many years ago I testified at a hearing in New York State at which the presiding assemblyman conceded that "the process is the punishment." At issue were relatively minor offenses or disputes in which any kind of verdict would have been difficult to prove, so the strategy was to drag out the process in contemplation of eventual dismissal. This same strategy was used in dealing with the illegal mass arrests of Occupy participants - drag out the process and eventually dismiss the charges for the vast majority. Since working people can ill afford to keep taking off time to attend hearings that go nowhere, this has a deterrent effect the next time a person considers exercising the right of free assembly.

This leads me to wonder if Assange is being well-advised to remain in the Ecuadorian embassy all these years. Since the case against him in Sweden was too weak for actual charges to be brought, perhaps he should have simply appeared before the Swedish panel. The US DOJ has never made public any charges against him, and perhaps they never would have. If he were indicted for publishing classified material, it seems that it would have been necessary to also indict people at the New York Times and other papers - and that would not have happened.

I may be wrong, of course, since Jeffrey Sterling was sent to jail while James Risen and his bosses at the New York Times were not charged at all in the recent case involving the inept US attempt to disrupt Iranian nuclear development.