Home | About | Donate

The Problem Isn't Just That Trump's a Racist. It's That He Keeps Acting On His Racism


#1

The Problem Isn't Just That Trump's a Racist. It's That He Keeps Acting On His Racism

Karine Jean-Pierre
The president has always been a racist. The issue is that he now has the power to make policy based on prejudice.
"Every person who stays silent on Donald Trump’s racism, regardless of their own race or party, is betraying not just America’s communities of color, but the very ideals on which this country was founded." (Photo: Getty)

#2

I feel absolutely awful saying this to the author:

Trump represents his racist base. Quite well.
You emigrated to a country that is embarrassingly racist–let’s say 35% hardcore, possibly higher.
Racism will always exist–humans tend to be idiots in general.
There will be times when it makes sense to work with racists to advance mutual interests–which hurts.
We were definitely NOT founded on the principle of everyone being created equal–that’s a myth.
Don’t expect the Democrats to stand strong behind a clean DACA renewal–it probably won’t happen.

But please know this: There are plenty of Americans who love and support one another, no strings attached. You have friends, you have people who will fight by your side.


#3

“Content of their character” I can’t top that.


#4

Texas: a place where I despise the voting goof, but if my vehicle failed me, I’d rather be nowhere else.


#5

The irony of Trump revealing himself as the outright racist we all know him
to be and then proclaiming Martin Luther King Day on the very next day is
enough to make one gag.

Nevertheless, I’ve always thought that politics ultimately comes down to fear vs. hope.

These days both parties are motivated by fear.

Without dynamic, positive leadership, the politicians—and the
electorate—revert to fear. Fear of not being re-elected. Fear of the
other. Fear and insecurity.

I’m currently reading “The Book of Joy” by Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama.
Tutu says that despair causes us to look inward. Hope allows us to embrace
others and work together for a more positive outcome.

Today’s political landscape lacks the moral leadership to help us move forward.

Someone needs to emerge as the leader who can appeal to hope and motivate us
to work together to overcome the legacy of hatred and racism that remains at
the heart of the American political process.

I remain hopeful that such a person will soon hear the call.


#6

Ever since I became politically active in 1962 (campaigning for California governor Pat Brown running against Nixon) there HAVE been no shortage of candidates “who appeal to hope and hear the call”.

Unfortunately, during the 20th century both the Democratic and Republican Parties have glued such candidates to the group W bench post haste.

Since the 1996 advent of faux news and into the 21st century no such candidate has shown their face anywhere near the GOP, while the Democrats have promptly 86’d candidates who are not significantly more right wing than POTUS Nixon and Ford were.


#7

Racism - the generalized designation of a target for hatred (unresolved conceptual illusions about obstacles to love) is a mortally threatening emotional shortcoming looking for a place to manifest in the material. Along the way it infests/invests its unspoken mortal fear(s) in any fork in the road, any decision nexus, and most notably in its silence in satisfaction.

It is catastrophic incompletion externalized as projectile - intended to be deadly whether to idea or being. It is the same dynamic as marketing to the laughable ‘elite’ - which by definition is EFFETE and the opposite of elite. Think about it. Why else is the “life-style”, so dependant on the denial of equality, balance and weaponry ?


#8

From the “Family Values” and “Right to Life” Party of liars, racists and hypocrites. Send them home in 2018!


#9

In the immortal words of FDR: "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."
It was true then. It is true now, and always.


#10

I have to say that “I hate’” the lame statement that the US is a racist country. Racism is a people problem. Name one country that does not have racism and even slavery associated with its past and current behaviors. A bit of context for you: Slavery in the USA was introduced by Europe and England. The USA did not invent racism or slavery but it was the first country in history that abolished slavery as a practice. The USA in part fought for this cause since its a founding principle: “All are created equal…” The south attempted to separate itself from that constitution and paid the price. Also … just a quick reminder that it was the then Democratic party who in large part enslaved, fought for segregation, established Jim Crow laws, and created the KKK. Be careful when associating “morality” with a party since the meaning and people behind those titles do change.


#11

No. The problem is that millions of Americans are racists. If they weren’t, Trump wouldn’t be racist. Similarly, if millions of English and Welsh people weren’t racists, we wouldn’t be leaving the EU. The public has lost its moral compass.


#12

You’d best read my comment history before you align me with the Democrats.

And yes, racism is a people problem–you’re right–but this article is about our country.

And our country lies to itself about inclusion, tolerance, brotherhood and equality, while holding itself up as an example to others. Even our founders devised a tricky way to include slave populations in the census: As 3/5 of a man…So don’t BS yourself about “All are created equal” being a founding principle.


#13

The mythology of the Founding Fathers overlooks the fact that they personified what the writer bell hooks calls “the imperialist, white supremacist, capitalist, patriarchy.”

The USA may not have invented slavery, but its founders certainly did their best to perpetuate it.


#14

We have to admit that Trump has given THE U.S. a whole NEW meaning to: WHITE HOUSE!