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The Real Irish-American History Not Taught in Schools

#1

The Real Irish-American History Not Taught in Schools

Bill Bigelow

“Wear green on St. Patrick’s Day or get pinched.” That pretty much sums up the Irish-American “curriculum” that I learned when I was in school. Yes, I recall a nod to the so-called Potato Famine, but it was mentioned only in passing.

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#2

When the Capitalists do their body counts to proclaim Socialism a failure because of Government policies that led to famines , they never acknowledge that many millions that die due to famine in Capitalist systems.

In Socialist systems the blame put on the Government. In Capitalism the Government never to blame as famine just a function of what they call the Natural “Free Market”.

http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/photoessay.htm

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#3

On my roomate’s TV screen ten sentence headlines flash on the screen saver.
One read that 2018 was the wettest on record.

I can guarantee that it was one of the driest for the pacific north west.
Rivers rage at this time of the year. They are near the bottom, exposing lines on the shore we don’t get to see even in the summer.

We rarely have three consecutive days without days without rain through April. We have had no rain clouds for a week.

The water accumulation is so high that all the low lying areas are always full of water in Eugene and north of it. Along the streets, highways and in all catchment areas. None of that is happening right now.

My friend John has a creek running through his property that we couldn’t cross in may.

Last week, his well did not pull enough water to supply the needs for his house.

Anecdotal?
Sure.
Have it your way.

When we are unable to grow enough to feed ourselves thanks to climate change, and the gun manufacturers have met their sales quotas, we will have no place to hide.

Gear up for our upcoming famine. Or sure, wear green on Sunday.

My KJ, who has commitment issues, implored me to come to St. Patty’s at Hannrahan’s on Sunday. Wear green, she implored .

I asked her if they have a steak or lamb Irish stew, and agreed to come only when she answered in the affirmative.

I sang Goanna’s solid rock last night. It is something I have done before. It is the song about Aborigine genocide in Australia that I have previously posted on another thread. She dropped my mike volume so low I could not hear myself though the speakers.

I made me angry and I showed it on my next song after which I left.

I am not going to partake in the vulgar display of shallowness.
Fuck the toadies.

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#4

irishholocaust.org to find out which regiments of the British Army shipped food out of Ireland.

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#5

That link doesn’t work for me.
" The British landlords, who demanded rent from the starving poor and exported other food crops? The British government, which allowed these food exports and offered scant aid to Irish peasants? "
The real issue, underlying these, is that the land in question had been taken from the Irish and handed over to protestant immigrants or converts.
A story that has a familiar ring to it: Ireland was a the bullpen in which British imperialism warmed up, tested itself and came up with a plan for America.

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#6

If anybody is interested, the first significant Irish emigration wave was by the rebellious and outlaw clan families who had been earlier transported to Ulster from Scotland’s Border region by James VI.

Being Presbyterian, the Ulster-Scots were persecuted by the legally dominant Episcopalian elite and the socially entrenched indigenous Catholics, and so left landless they fled to America long before the Famine years.

The term “hillbilly” comes from those orange immigrants who continued to sing their folk songs about King William of Orange - King Billy

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#7

A couple of references I know of are the movie “Gangs of New York,” and the book or movie, “The Fountainhead.”
Good depictions of the Irish in Gotham.

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#8

Good old Brits, eh? Check out another major famine of the Bengal province in British India in 1943. Google it.

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#9

The landless Ulster-Scots…ah, give me a break. The land belonged to the Irish, originally. And, the theft occurred by the conquering Brits, of course.
They’re mostly still scum, but the Brits were especially so in the 18th and 19th Century.
This article I’ve read before. It is just a nice post-it note summary but the history of the potato blight, and the real gruesome stories of the reign of British Imperialism, are told at kitchen tables in good homes with good people around telling them.
Many good people will forgive, but they’ll never forget. And, the Brits losing a little sleep over that doesn’t bother them even a whit.

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#10

Those Ulster-Scots had been forcibly deported from their homeland.

In the early fight for Irish freedom, the Presbyterians were allied with the Catholics in the United Irishmen.

It was later the British played the Orange card to sow division, something they then did at a later time with Muslims and Hindus to hold back India’s independence.

I could go to earlier history such as the Scot’s claim via the Bruces (themselves a Norman-French family) to the High King crown of Ireland.

Or I could go even further back into history and describe the Scotti invasion of Alba

Irish history is complicated and by over-simplifying it does not lead to understanding it.

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#11

Whether this issue or another, we must constantly challenge the false narratives 24/7 that shape the culture of corruption.

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#12

Systematic exploitation by the landlord class (many absentee) in the decades leading up to the famine - gradually reduced the population to subsistence living based on the potato crop. Pre photography, illustrators depict the poverty of the people well before the potato blight. The failure of the potato crop merely revealed how impoverished the people were.
Subsistence on mielie meal (maize) in Sub-Saharan Africa is the lot of millions of people today. A widespread failure of the maize crop would reveal this. The resulting famine would be due - not to the failure of the staple crop, but to the systematic exploitation of third-world nations by corporate capitalism.

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#13

Can we go back to the beginning Back to the 5th century,whena Romano-British Christian missionary Maewyn Succat was dispatched by The Catholic Church to “clear the land” for the coming of Christianity to Ireland.When Succat and his band of less than reputable crew members reached Ireland they discovered a tribe of Africans call Twa…Succat called them"Snakeheads".These Christians set out to capture and kill as many as they could.All of the Twa were murdered.These were Africans,the tallest among them less than 4 ft tall. After committing genocide…The Catholic Church invented "The Lie about St.Patrick and how he chased the “Snakes” out of Ireland,Snakes are not Indigenous to Ireland…Human Genocide in Ireland sanctioned by The Catholic Church. Don’t take my word for it…Research …I did.

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#14

“…school curriculum could and should ask students to reflect on the contradiction of starvation amidst plenty.”

The public school curriculum has become one, big JOKE because those who created it are God damn idiots. That’s a prerequisite to becoming an educational mover and shaker.

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#15

Hi tvpblaq1: I like reading of why Hadrian had to build his wall—, I like reading of Queen Boudicca —how Caesar misunderstood the Irish so badly ----how Celts were all over in many places in Europe----The trouble with so many religions is that the incoming leaders want to wipe out those of any other religion. I never knew of the Twa–thanks another time and place to research. : )

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#16

So the Brits, who conquered the island, decided to jam a bunch of foreigners onto other people’s land ( though most of the Irish were already servants to Imperialism ) along with their usual dose of snobbery an elitist, asinine proclamations. Backed by genocidal threats, of course.
The history of Ireland is very controversial and bloody, made more so by a British ignorance and bullying disposition, truly Trumpian for its scope and ill will.

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#17

The beginning of the 21st century reflects how weirdly so many Americans were ----and are negatively affected----- This makes me wonder what the future will be as reading the truth of what England did to the Irish. seems like what many of the corporations and places in government are doing to the population today!
The implosion of America has been building for some time---- Enron, Clinton’s killing Glass- Steagall, the commingling of investments and commercial banks the implosion of the housing market, the implosion of the job market, outsourcing jobs, the rise of the gig economy, the slow and painful imploding job market--------rent and food are going up and up, so it is easy to see how many people become homeless and fall out of human society. Sometimes it seems like the Irish experience is coming soon to America.
I worry about this lack of humanity from governments----the changing weather events of the planet–as we turn into a shit hole country, as we have seen how populations are forgotten like Flint and their poisoned water— ignoring entire populations like Puerto Rico and tornado victims in Alabama, -Eating -----for many could become a life or death matter when the American government and corporations treat us as disposable widgets— i am hoping that Americans will not be turned into the dying populations and recreating death in the same way that England treated the Irish. sigh -----------as Langston Hughes once said. that, “… someday America will be-----” -you better hurry up America : (

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#18

Any good news BID?

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#19

Can I suggest that the Catholic Church has contributed greatly to the problems of Ireland.

After independence the Irish government permitted its social services to be run by the Catholic Church hence the creation of institutions as depicted in the accurate movie about the Magdalene Laundries and the discovery of hundreds of babies in mass graves at Tuam.

Decades later we are all glad to see the end of this theocratic State.

The Irish migration led to the creation of segregated schools in Scotland at the insistence of the Catholic Church and adds to the continued prevalence of bigotry that blights Scotland today.

As someone raised a few streets away from the birth-place of James Connolly, he should be cited:-
“…the man who imagines that in the supreme hour of the proletarian struggle for victory the Church will definitely line up with the forces of capitalism, and pledge her very existence as a Church upon the hazardous chance of the capitalists winning, simply does not understand the first thing about the policy of the Church in the social or political revolutions of the past. Just as in Ireland the Church denounced every Irish revolutionary movement in its day of activity, as in 1798, 1848 and 1867, and yet allowed its priests to deliver speeches in eulogy of the active spirits of those movements a generation afterwards, so in the future the Church, which has its hand close upon the pulse of human society, when it realises that the cause of capitalism is a lost cause it will find excuse enough to allow freedom of speech and expression to those lowly priests whose socialist declarations it will then use to cover and hide the absolute anti-socialism of the Roman Propaganda. When that day comes the Papal Encyclical against socialism will be conveniently forgotten by the Papal historians, and and the socialist utterances, of the von Kettelers, the McGlynns, and McGradys will be heralded forth and the communistic utterances of the early fathers as proofs of Catholic sympathy with progressive ideas. Thus it has been in the past. Thus it will be…”

“After Ireland is free, says the patriot who won’t touch socialism, we will protect all classes, and if you won’t pay your rent you will be evicted same as now. But the evicting party, under command of the sheriff, will wear green uniforms and the Harp without the Crown, and the warrant turning you out on the roadside will be stamped with the arms of the Irish Republic. Now, isn’t that worth fighting for?

And when you cannot find employment, and, giving up the struggle of life in despair, enter the poorhouse, the band of the nearest regiment of the Irish army will escort you to the poorhouse door to the tune of St. Patrick’s Day. Oh! It will be nice to live in those days!

“With the Green Flag floating o’er us” and an ever-increasing army of unemployed workers walking about under the Green Flag, wishing they had something to eat. Same as now! Whoop it up for liberty!” “Let us free Ireland,” says the patriot who won’t touch Socialism. Let us all join together and cr-r-rush the br-r-rutal Saxon. Let us all join together, says he, all classes and creeds. And, says the town worker, after we have crushed the Saxon and freed Ireland, what will we do? Oh, then you can go back to your slums, same as before. Whoop it up for liberty!

“Ireland as distinct from her people is nothing to me; and the man who is bubbling over with love and enthusiasm for ‘Ireland’ and yet can pass unmoved through our streets and witness all the wrong and suffering and the shame and the degradation wrought upon the people of Ireland: aye, wrought by Irishmen upon Irishmen and women without burning to end it, is a fraud and a liar in his heart, no matter how he loves that combination of chemical elements he is pleased to call ‘Ireland’”. ‘The Coming Generation’ 1900

“If you remove the English army to-morrow and hoist the green flag over Dublin Castle, unless you set about the organisation of the Socialist Republic your efforts would be in vain. England would still rule you. She would rule you through her capitalists, through her landlords, through her financiers, through the whole array of commercial and individualist institutions she has planted in this country and watered with the tears of our mothers and the blood of our martyrs. England would still rule you to your ruin, even while your lips offered hypocritical homage at the shrine of that Freedom whose cause you had betrayed. Nationalism without Socialism – without a reorganisation of society on the basis of a broader and more developed form of that common property which underlay the social structure of Ancient Erin – is only national recreancy.” – James Connolly, “Socialism and Nationalism”

It is a pity that Connolly eventually would ally himself with the very forces that he organized the Citizen’s Army to fight against to the disappointment of Sean O’Casey.
O’Casey wrote that “ Connolly had stepped from the narrow by-way of Irish Socialism on to the crowded highway of Irish Nationalism ”. He gave “ fixing on the frontage of Liberty Hall a scroll on which was written ‘We serve neither King nor Kaiser, but Ireland’” as an example of Connolly’s “determined attachment to the principles enunciated by Sinn Fein and the Irish Volunteers, which were. in many instances, directly contrary to his life-long teaching of Socialism”. As a result, O’Casey went on, “Liberty Hall was no longer the Headquarters of Irish Labour, but the centre of Irish disaffection”.

Nationalism is romantic nonsense and events such as St Patrick’s Day reinforces the absurdity. American, British and Scottish nationalism are as equally delusional, IMHO

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#20

Hi GANDOLF, you know I am overly fond of dystopian novels. : )

ON the downside , I am struck by how often "mighty nations, " seem to fall the same way------
However, I am totally inspired by Greta Thunberg and the progressives! : )

I guess I am " Stuck in the Middle Again." : )

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