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The Road to Paris and the Path to Renewable Energy


#1

The Road to Paris and the Path to Renewable Energy

Jed Alegado

Renewable energy is now being seen by many people around the world as a cost-effective development solution both for developed and developing nations. Countries have slowly been realising that the use of coal and the huge amount of carbon emissions it generates harms the environment and impacts our daily activities.

In fact, according to Christine Lins, Executive Secretary of the Renewable Energy Network for the 21st Century, “last year, for the first time in 40 years, economic and emissions growth have decoupled”.


#2

Small rural communities could afford to put up a windmill for their own use irrespective of being connected to the grid. One often sees small communities here with a water tower to provide water pressure. A single large windmill is roughly equivalent to a water tower and should be a familiar sight in all small communities.

That isn't to say that they be disconnected from the grid but instead be an addition to the electricity provided by the grid. However this would be exclusively that one small town's electricity generator. They would always have basic and emergency services power during major black outs or brown outs. They would probably be able to sell back excess electricity to the grid depending on size or how many windmills are erected.

Every small town and hamlet should have at least one emergency services windmill. That said... every small town should invest in providing their own electricity. That was never possible before but it is now.

Local energy production is possible and well within the pocketbooks of small communities using windmills.

In remote rural communities such as Mr. Alegado mentions, it is almost a requisite. The costs of electricity would eventually pay off the cost of a windmill and then the costs of electricity could be reinvested back into that hamlet or town instead of that money going to the big energy producers.

Technology has caught up to locally produced power for remote communities. Somehow our minds have grown so used to thinking that electricity must be produced on a huge scale...that we forget that small communities don't need a huge scale and the technology is now available for them to do their own energy production.

They should do their own thing ... so to speak! Geez I haven't said that in a long time... lol!!!

Do your own thing... energy production wise! Get your town their own windmill.


#5

"Somehow our minds have grown so used to thinking that electricity must be produced on a huge scale...that we forget that small communities don't need a huge scale and the technology is now available for them to do their own energy production."

       Yes and that goes for FOOD, too.  We keep thinking we have to go to the SUPER MARKET to get food. When really, all we need is for each of our own communities, to grow food... in rural areas farmers could devote their land to CSA's and no more tomatoes flying across the country..... we would not only eat local, BUT SEASONAL TOO.... Yes, seasonal.... and if some want to have meat in their diet, some people could grow a few pigs or chickens... hell there's always deer... but, I'll bet people wouldn't be able to eat meat three times a day, there would probably not be enough for that... me, I'm not a meat eater, although I do eat fish.  Now,

I have to explain that I just came back from my walk and talked with a local farmer... and .... I was careful as to how I came across because a lot of the farmers around here were extremely disappointed that fracking wasn't passed..... but, I did bring up CSA's... he said he has heard of them. He said he is retired but his grandson wants to work the farm.... I guess I'll have to keep walking up there.... the grandson went to college for agriculture... and this farmer agreed he is being taught the "corporate version" as I suggested.... but, I am going to keep up the talk. People know me around here from my walking everywhere. So, eventually, I may be able to turn my community around... big plans, I know... but, I'm feeling this out. AS that farmer and I talked... California came up and he kept saying "It's the bread basket for us and it's burning up."


#8

It looks as though they include "big hydro" in their census of "renewable" energy. But big dams are not carbon neutral, producing methane gas when first filled and also throughout their operating lives. Big dams also eventually silt up.

In the developing field of ecological accounting, big hydro is understood to contribute to global warming.