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The Solution to Climate Change Right Under Our Feet


#1

The Solution to Climate Change Right Under Our Feet

Andrea Germanos, staff writer

What if there were a risk-free way of helping to mitigate climate change while simultaneously addressing food and water security?

A new report from the Center for Food Safety's Cool Foods Campaign says that such an opportunity is possible, and it's right below our feet.


#2

Maybe we could start doing things that already work and are shovel ready like algae. Algae growing on vertical frames of thin concrete bathed in saline suck up pollutants and co2 while giving off fresh water vapor that cools and moisturizes the atmosphere. Harvested algae is buried CCS or used to make biofuels. Hang these panels on bridge abutments, parking garages, industrial buildings and houses.

If algae was eating co2 it would be capturing the C carbon and giving off O oxygen which is in short supply. Little oasis of high oxygen content atmosphere. Neat!


#3

This all sounds really great... but, if it's only here on CD .... it won't get far... or even on other sites.... there has to be an over all policy to put it into effect.... which, means... no more Agribusiness..... and ...need I say more ?


#4

Nothing will stop the Carbon Barons now they're so powerful they will KILL or imprison anyone that gets in their way , they call it Freedom. For everyone else its the new slavery.


#6

Here in Pittsburgh, we are celebrating out 30th year of negative population growth...

Capitalist production is what is feeding ever-increasing CO2 emissions - and capitalist production has nothing to do with population growth.


#7

I am rather skeptical of ANY simple-fix articles written by bourgeois liberals like this article. This is just a variant of the "Biochar!!" "Biochar!!" fanaticism....


#8

This is so important that it needs very serious and disinterested scientific research to quantify the actual potential for carbon sequestration and the best practices. Like Yunzer, I have some skepticism about the claims that proper agricultural practices could completely reverse climate change...but I do believe it could make a big difference. How big? We need solid facts!


#10

Yes, but although I made that comment above, I WILL go down fighting... so, I'll put into practice what ever I can... and try to educate... today, I will be going to an Earth Fest at Binghamton U. to sit at the Green Party table...yeah, I know, but a party IS what it's members are... so.....


#11

This is science? There is no information on how it works. No one evens knows that it does work.


#12

Capitalist production has nothing to do with population growth?

Who do you think buys all those products?

While you type on a computer, where did you think it came from? Or do your computer get made by woodland elves?


#13

This article says there is no research that it even works. So, basically CD made something up and passed it off as science.

The link between breeding and shopping is clear, yet ignored because that would mean stopping the eternal blaming of corporations and the government and actually looking at personal habits.

People buy products then use those products to breed some more and the cycle continues. Corporations and the government profit off of this, which leads to more resource loss. And around and around we go. Until we run out of resources.

Then you have famine and war. Say hello to reality.


#14

You don't need to be a rocket scientist to understand that organic matter is carbon rich and that the more of it there is in the soil the more carbon there is in the soil. This explains the connection between the decrease of organic matter in agricultural soils and the increase in gaseous carbon in the atmosphere. We are breaking down tons of organic matter every year which releases carbon into the sky. In a sense we are burning our soil just like we are burning our fossil fuels.


#15

Thank you for this article, that reminds us of what has been know for a long time: if we regenerate our soils, we will halt climate change. Of course, the political and economic elite do not like even to talk about this option, since is gives no profit. They do not see life, they only focus on money. But we need to embrace it, and push the issue just like Center for Food Safety does with this small report. Thanks to Andrea, Common Dreams for yet another article about healthy ways of living. Please continue to remind us of what free and natural options we have available to improve our situation.


#16

I am a soil biologist and its absolutely true that we can lock up a high percentage of the current atmospheric CO2 in the soils as long as we allow the organic material to replace itself and restore the soil biology so that this living system can do its job. Our current agricultural system is completely unsustainable and we are now seeing the results of complete disregard to natural systems that allow life on this planet to flourish in a healthy regenerative way. We know and have the experience to reverse nearly all the problems we have created, what we lack is a cultural narrative to allow this to happen. Over population is a myth, many scientist now believe that the only way we are going to reverse the current ecological and social problems is if we all take part in some way to steward nature in her recovery. This is obviously not currently possible due to our current paradigm and this is what needs to change first. Capitalism is the sickness as it is complete contradiction to the physical reality we all live with.


#17

industrial hemp plants are big carbon suckers as well. And they make really good reinforcement for low rise buildings. Look up Hempcrete, and find video of British architect gushing over its use.


#18

Yes this is science. Here's a couple of longterm peer-reviewed studies whose numbers and conclusions are clear:

Organic Agriculture and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Context of Food Security
http://www.ifoam.org/pdfs/OrganicAgricultureandClimateChange.pdf
40 year multinational, multidisciplinary, peer reviewed study

Organic Farming Sequesters Atmospheric Carbon and Nutrients in Soils
The Rodale Institute
http://www.strauscom.com/rodale-whitepaper/
Since 1981, data from the Farming Systems Trial has revealed that soil under organic agriculture management can accumulate about 1,000 pounds of carbon per acre foot of soil each year. This accumulation is equal to about 3,500 pounds of carbon dioxide per acre taken from the air and sequestered into soil organic matter. When multiplied over the 160 million acres of corn and soybeans grown nationally, a potential for 580 billion pounds of excess carbon dioxide per year can be sequestered when farmers transition to organic grain systems.
http://www.strauscom.com/rodale-whitepaper/


#19

Hi Yunzer, Biochar does work, the problem with it is that it's a technological 'solution' so it has it's own embedded carbon footprint.

Besides the footprint issue, biochar has been shown to be less effective than composting because composting enhances the myriad life forms that underlie real soil health.

Here's one link, but there's many others. Just search biochar vs. composting
http://www.treehugger.com/lawn-garden/biochar-or-compost-whats-best-for-soil-quality-video.html


#20

Absolutely right, there's many viable solutions, the problem is none of them makes anyone in the Bankers and Billionaires Club richer. Consequently no capitalist government anywhere would consider them.

There's one country that isn't though - Bhutan.
The Happy Lesson From Bhutan's Organic Farmers
http://themudreport.blogspot.ca/2015/02/the-lesson-of-bhutans-national-organic.html


#22

Hello Binghamton. I went to Earth Day at Corning Community College. You are so right, we must educate by any means possible.


#23

What exactly is a 'bourgeois liberal' I wonder? Have I ever met one? Could it be that I am one without actually knowing it?
I am somewhat skeptical of biochar because it is not something that occurs naturally. But I am a great fan of compost, one of the most successful of man's attempts to improve upon natural processes.
"We need data!" Maybe, but results are much better.