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This Is How Net Neutrality Will End


#1

This Is How Net Neutrality Will End

Chad Marlow

On June 11, net neutrality protections will cease to exist. This means your internet service provider will be able to engage in content based discrimination. Internet content it likes — for political or financial reasons — will be delivered at top speeds, while content it disfavors will be slowed or even blocked.

But will that start happening on day one? Almost certainly not, because the big telecoms that fought so hard to kill net neutrality are smarter than that.


#2

for at least 40 years corporations and the media and politicians they own have used this boiling frog tactic in shifting the US from a democracy to a fascist tyranny. They know that if you toss a frog into a kettle of boiling water it will jump out immediately, whereas if you put the frog in cold water and turn the heat up gradually the frog doesn’t notice and gets cooked.

Ending net neutrality will be another in the long list of examples of applying the boiling frog tactic.


#3

Dear Congress please REMEMBER:

When We the People lose access-------you need to hire bigger staffs because if we can’t reach you on line, them we will all inundate you with MAIL and require a reply in a LETTER…that’s good for the post office too—I like them and they need to be here to start up the Post Office Bank again.

I never shop at Amazon, but i guess when everyone else in small business is undercut------and the little guy is gone---------AMAZON will suddenly raise its prices ----HIGH----like the awful people who hired farm workers and rented their housing back to the workers and even made them buy at the company store--------soon ft was of the workers worked for free because the overlords took it all They will do the same to us. Look for more awful decisions from courts too since imaginary people count more than DNA ones.

With fast lines for the rich, and snail lanes for the rest, we will learn of events long after they have happened. PLEASE read Fahrenheit 451, because we seem to be going that way.
I suppose that when the powers decide there are too many of us, 911 will no doubt ring busy if you’re in the wrong zip code. : 0

I’m being awfully depressing, but without net neutrality-------- how and where will a democratic republic and free speech function?


#4

Oh please! This employee of the ACLU assures us that if we just keep doing what we’ve been doing, the oligarchs will surely relent, and net neutrality will be restored.

On what basis does he make this radically counter-factual claim?

None.

Unless you count “wishful thinking” as supporting evidence for such an assertion.

Sorry, ACLU, your gig is up!

Your record is excellent—when it comes to making the middle managers, upon whom this entrenched, inherently inequitable system relies for both its funding and its claim to moral force, feel good about themselves because they sent you money or signed some of your petitions.

Your record is terrible—when it comes to actually transforming the violence which so thoroughly characterizes and permeates modernity.

Finally, and against all odds, a significant number of humans, long enslaved within this system of which you have been an integral part, are seeing how it all works.

You’ll never get that horse back in the barn, dudes. All the wishful thinking in the world notwithstanding.


#5

Remember what republicans used to say about medical marijuana: “give them and inch and they’ll take a mile” as a way for them to deny legalizing medical marijuana?

Yeah, the ISPs will be taking miles before long. Save your search results now and compare them to later.
However, already when I try to find something to I want to buy on the net, all I get is Amazon. It won’t be just content they block. They will advance businesses who they have corporate deals with. Any business who can’t afford to pay-to-play will get buried in the bottom of a search list at best. I know what you’re probably thinking “that I’m confusing search engines and ISPs.” Doubt me know, but you’ll remember me later.