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This Shamefully Ignored School Shooting Is Why Kids Should Walk Out for 18 Minutes, Not 17


#1

This Shamefully Ignored School Shooting Is Why Kids Should Walk Out for 18 Minutes, Not 17

Will Bunch

It was a moment of sheer terror that surely none of the hundreds of kids flooding the corridors for the end of the school day will ever forget. One moment, 17-year-old Courtlin Arrington — already accepted to college for the fall, with dreams of becoming a nurse — was seen with another teen student, a wide receiver on the football team. Then came a loud pop as a bullet went right through Courtlin’s heart, ending her life way too short of adulthood.


#2

While I agree in spirit with need to remember our loss of Courtlin as an up and coming compassionate nurse, this fight is largely about semi-automatic rifles. As such, I would recommend the minute count of the walkout be equal to the number of rounds fired by the shooter (name withheld on purpose), which I believe to be over one hundred. Little mention is made of the injured. How are they doing? We need more random acts of kindness in this country if we are to avert more of these random acts of violence. I’ll try to improve my game starting today as I know I can do better than I have been.


#3

The real problem is that there are too many gun deaths (few of them, actually, in mass-death events in K-12 schools) of all kinds in all parts of our country. Too many to know about each one, too many to know each of the victims and circumstances, too many to hold all the survivors as they need to be held. Our gun culture is what’s shameful, not that we missed this one poignant event. And our myth of redemptive violence.

There were 7000 pairs of shoes lined up on the Capitol lawn yesterday, one for each of the estimated child victims of gun violence since Newtown. Courtlin is included among them.


#4

WB I know you mean well but lets let the Student do it their way.


#5

Although I get the point that this author is making, he seems to be dumping odd criticism on these kids.

Especially odd since having 17 people slaughtered in your high school, isn’t exactly a sign of privilege.

They are to what, then open themselves up to the spectacle of adding one more minute, wait, 3 more, wait 5 more, wait, 2 more more, etc.

Also, it is as if this author just assumes these kids haven’t been sincere in their message, that this movement is about school shootings having been ignored on a national scale, as in, it has become normalized.

Also, this was planned as a NATIONAL walkout. And the expressed INTENT of these students wasn’t just to “honor” the 17 in their school but to protest all school shootings.

That gap also points to a hole in events like Wednesday’s National School Walkout and the possibly even bigger March for Our Lives that originated from the kids in Parkland and is slated for Saturday, March 24.

A hole? Like a bullet hole? Damn, these kids just can’t win.

And did the author bother to interview some of the kids leading this movement? To get their feelings on this death and to have them put it in perspective of their movement?

Or would that have taken the steam out of the angle on this sideways criticism?

I want to ask the author, where have you been? Took THIS long to write this article? Shameful!

And the last literary sniper shot at these kids is a bit over the top…

A social revolution that follows the sad example of the media and ignores Courtlin — and so many lost children just like her — is doomed to fall short.

Now they have to share the criticism of the media as well. Wow, okay.

Find another way to make your point, dear Author.


#6

Ummm, I read the whole GD article wondering when the motive of the shooter would be mentioned, or at least a lack of motive would be acknowledged. Sheesh.


#8

If that was sarcastic, you need to mark it as such while the edit is still open.


#9

Sadly, I don’t think it was. What a joyless, miserable excuse for a human being jtylerpittman must be.


#10

According to two of the linked articles, no clear motive has been established; police initially considered it to be an accident but have revised that consideration.

But your point is well-taken. I grew so tired of the linking daisy-chain endemic to every article a long time ago. At least if the hypertext display states the basic idea or point contained in the linked article that helps with the narrative of the original article so I don’t have to go off elsewhere only to have to return once I uncover the missing information.


#11

Instead of criticizing the students who responded to the school massacres for not also talking about the day-in, day-out “urban” gun violence, is it too callous to ask: WHY DON’T URBAN YOUTH ORGANIZE? After all, they’re the movers & shakers of Black Lives Matter. So, it’s not like these youth don’t have a model for protest. I[ve seen local (Minneapolis,MN) campaigns with t-shirts saying “Put Down Guns, Pick Up Books!” That would be a start towards ending the carnage in urban neighborhoods.


#12

“the machinations of the NRA”

And the machinations of the NSSF, and others.

The ‘gun lobby’ is not just the NRA.

See: https://www.opensecrets.org/industries./indus.php?cycle=2018&ind=Q13


#13

I wish I owned this forum. I’d block your ip, then you could rattle on some other forum that your free-dumb of speech was curtailed on one of them thar leftist sites.

Go cluck yourself.


#14

I agree about this person being joyless - let’s add useless as well.


#15

Urrban sub humans? What are you anyway? Get off this site!


#16

This story of Parkland is beginning to remind me of the Las Vegas incident–weeks later there are more questions than answers, and the story is falling apart under scrutiny.

As Thomas Pynchon noted, if they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don’t have to worry about answers.


#17

Something is deeply wrong here when the machine can coopt any movement…institute a whole 17 minute protest which is nothing more then letting the students take a 15 minute smoke break outside as long as they stand there peacefully…and it is considered by everyone as some great statement of protest.


#18

Excuse me? I haven’t heard the story of the Parkland shooting in any way “falling apart.” In fact, (and @Dan_Harris) yesterday’s walkouts, all over the country, over 4 time zones of 10 AM, were the workings of a “machine” of our children’s own creation. No, it was not a smoke break. Kids in Detroit walked out in the cold. Some kids accepted detentions on their records because they thought raising their voices was worth it. What about the school that assembled on the football field to spell out #ENOUGH?

And just wait until the 24th, when they’ll be joined by supportive adults like me.


#19

Sorry if I upset you bkwrites…but I again will tell you no 17 minute strike ever accomplished anything…ever.

You want change you leave school en mass and you don’t go back until you are heard. Make it nationwide and undeniable for all the world to see and then perhaps…must maybe…you might get a little justice.

Regardless of who organized it, it was a lesson in how not to strike.


#20

Looked that way to me. And it’s far from the last action.


#21

Children walking in protest is proof of nothing except children walking in protest. High emotions and passions are proof of nothing except emotional involvement in what is basically a losing proposition.

I condemn nobody for their protests, but they are proof of nothing. They do not resolve the obvious questions: why a training exercise with screaming, yelling and the firing of blanks, talked about NOT by the media, but only a few teachers and students. No videos from the 26 video cameras inside. No interviews in the media with the school consultant for security. Essentially a cover-up just like the other cover-ups we have seen.