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To Galvanize Local Push for Medicare for All in 2019, Nurses' Union Organizing Nationwide 'Barnstorms'


#1

To Galvanize Local Push for Medicare for All in 2019, Nurses' Union Organizing Nationwide 'Barnstorms'

Julia Conley, staff writer

As progressive groups push Democratic leaders on Capitol Hill to bring Medicare for All legislation up for a vote in the new year—a move that would bring Congress closer to passing a proposal supported by 70 percent of voters—one of the nation's leading advocates for a single-payer system is asking supporters to make their voices heard in the fight to make universal healthcare a reality in the United States.


#2

The toughest fight will be getting centrist democrats to stop taking money from the insurance companies who fight single payer tooth and nail. Politicians like easy money.


#3

NNU has been a long-time supporter of HR 676. It now appears that they are backing the “Medicare for All” PR slogan as represented by Bernie Sanders’ S. 1804. Also, Pramila Jaypal is working to turn HR 676 into S. 1804, rather than vice versa. This would be a huge sell-out. A slogan is not substance. A Tweet Is Not Reality.


#4

The Nurses Union should bring pieces of their Barn and start throwing shit. That’s the only way they might succeed. Signs don’t work!


#5

It is a great slogan, but we need to go beyond that. How is it going to work? Where is the money going to come from? What about staffing? What about all the people who are currently working for the insurance companies? Will they be out of work? This will take a lot of thought and a lot of planning. Is anyone working on this?


#6

For anyone with progressive values, Terry McAuliffe’s Presidential aspirations should be DOA, before he’s even out of the gate. Our biggest fight for MFA is no longer with the voters, thankfully they finely get it, the real battle now, as Tom points out above, is to keep corporate Dems from corrupting the true version HR 676, and yes that includes Sanders. His introduction of S. 1804, should make any progressive pause, and wonder what his real intentions are.


#7

We are hoping to get a space in Burlington, VT to reach a difficult group–seniors. Contacted the Vermont PNHP to see about any plans. Will see about another local group.

Solidarity and good luck organizing where you are.


#8

Why we need to organize where we are and tout suite! Solidarity, Tom.


#9

“It shall never come to Pass”


#10

From The Real News:

https://therealnews.com/stories/medicare-for-all-how-can-we-pay-for-it

https://therealnews.com/stories/medicare-for-all-is-a-fight-to-democratize-the-economy

To help organize from HOPE:


#11

You must mean who is going to get the savings? Single payer Medicare for All is cheaper than the current system. Once again, you’re asking the wrong question. We went over this on another article, remember? Your question gets applied to things at the bottom of the priority list, not the things at the top. The Defense budget is a great place to start. Of course, we don’t need to reduce funding anywhere because total costs go down, not up, with Medicare for All. The real question is who gets the savings?

Quite possibly, but that means they can go do something productive, instead sucking the life out of others, although a good number of them might get good federal jobs working for Medicare.

Sorry bud, the thought and planning has been done – it’s called Medicare. It’s been around for several decades now. Not much to do here, just eliminate the age requirement for eligibility, get rid of the insurance companies, and staff up Medicare and you’re done.


#12

See below, read Tom’s post and go to Healthcare-now.org, pnhp.org, and Healthoverprofit.org and watch the video from the Real News below with Robert Pollin the economist on how we are going to pay for it. You need to be involved in getting answers.


#13

The toughest fight will be getting and keeping your fellow citizens on board when/if a real bill actually comes up for a vote. Protesting in centerists offices in Washington is easy to do, the hardest thing will be facing down a multimillion dollar multi-state campaign to stop a bill, particularly when real money gets dumped into anti-single payer challengers.


#14

A little off of base – but this shows in real time money being spent on so many things–This site is the best there is.

http://www.usdebtclock.org/


#15
Everybody In. Nobody Out.

We are fighting for a national single-payer healthcare system because access to healthcare is basic to human dignity

https://www.healthcare-now.org/


#16

No! You are very wrong about what they are calling Medicare these days. It’s not the same as what my parents and grandparents had! Many doctors don’t take some Medicare plans. The deductibles are rediculous and so are the drug prices. Guess you are not if age to have this confusing scam they call Medicare!


#17

You seem to misunderstand what I said. I’m talking about Single Payer Medicare for All – it’s an approach that gets rid of the insurance companies. I would also eliminate all deductibles and co-pays, they don’t really make sense unless you have insurance companies trying to keep you from getting health services.

Drug prices are a separate problem and were not within the scope of my comment. I agree they are ridiculous. I’d nationalize the pharma industry and place all of its functions under the NIH and make drugs free to the end-user.

Oh, and I am old enough to have Medicare.


#18

“'To build the mass collective action we know we’ll need to win, we’re asking activists…to organize…Medicare for All barnstorm[s]…At the barnstorm you’d gather with volunteers near you, talk about the plan to win, and begin organizing to knock doors, make phone calls, and more in your community.”

I’ll support the Nurses and the single payer movement regardless.

But, as I’ve written before, I’d propose health fairs like those organized by the late Stan Brock’s Remote Area Medical (RAM) - free eye care and dental clinics that draw thousands of the poor who instinctively support medicare for all, but who are typically disorganized - beset with their own problems - and, often, do not vote.

Beyond the good work of knocking on doors, politicized health care events can educate and mobilize the masses needed to force both Republicans and Democrats to support single payer.


#19

Got that right Sister G.

Solidarity in the New Year!