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Toward A Truly Indigenous Peace in The Korean Peninsula


#1

Toward A Truly Indigenous Peace in The Korean Peninsula

Simone Chun

Last month, I took part in an international women’s peace delegation to South Korea, led by Nobel Peace Laureate Mairead Maguire and Women Cross DMZ founder Christine Ahn.

It was my first visit to my native Korea in over 3 years. Everywhere I went, I witnessed the afterglow of the inspiring candlelight movement that restored democracy to the country, and sensed the deep conviction with which Koreans support the current peace process initiated by President Moon.


#2

This disregard for the interests of Koreans themselves in this nominally inter-Korean conflict was a declaration authored by seven leading Democratic Senators, demand that President Trump to hold to a hard line in any negotiations with North Korea. The letter signed by Senators Mendendez, Schumer, Durbin, Warner, Feinstein, Leahy and Brown completely overlooked the recent progress toward peace evinced by the inter-Korean summit and the Panmunjom Declaration, and discounted the overwhelming support for the current peace process by Koreans. Further, it was oblivious to the hopes and interests of 80 million Koreans who, after surviving 35 years of brutal Japanese colonization, were forcibly divided over 65 years ago by the US and the former Soviet Union. The letter offers no alternative vision for peace on the Korean Peninsula and considers Korean interests only insofar as they serve the narrow political agenda of the Democratic party. It represents a bankrupt foreign policy view.

This is what happens when so-called “progressives” running for the Congress offer no compelling anti-imperial world-view, or as these seven leading Dems do - offer a pro-imperialist world view.


#3

Jettison Trump and his Warmongering Ilk into space.

Promote the Peaceful Reunification of the Koreas.


#4

The main thing is to remember it was not our (the US) division to make, and it is not our division to heal. It’s time for us to learn to get out of the way.


#5

Sort of reminds me of the responses from the congressional representative to the letters that I write to them. It is as if they never read them since their response has nothing to do with what I wrote. The only strength that the citizen has is with SOLIDARITY


#6

From the article:

"…a declaration authored by seven leading Democratic Senators…Mendendez, Schumer, Durbin, Warner, Feinstein, Leahy and Brown…

Make that Democrat senators—there’s not a single democratic soul among them.

With that said, I’m very much interested to know what, if any, changes in the ROK Status of Forces agreement with the US can be expected. Washington, especially with the loony right in charge, won’t take kindly to having to repatriate those 27,000 tripwires—er, brave troops.

But “national sovereignty” is a cruel joke when a nation has foreign troops quartered there. It’s hard to imagine lasting peace on the peninsula unless and until the last helicopter lifts off.


#7

The article indirectly makes parallel comparisons to Ireland. I think the biggest difference is that Ireland has a more intact culture albeit troubled than Korea. To call this indigenous is a bit of stretch with all the competing interests involved.


#8

I made many friends with Koreans on my tour of duty there. For their sake and for the sake of their culture I wish them peace.

According to the mythic account recounted in the Samguk Yusa, Gojoseon (Old Joseon) kingdom was founded in northern Korea and southern Manchuria in 2333 BC. The Gija Joseon was purportedly founded in 12th century BC, and its existence and role have been controversial in the modern era.

Some of my soldiers would say that Koreans looked upon us as barbarians. That would not have been far from the truth in our 237 year culture vs their 5,000 year old culture.

It is perhaps more obvious today that being rich does not automatically make one smart, beautiful, kind or caring, but often the opposite.

Direct Democracy


#9

“We were the first civilians to walk across the Unification Bridge. As I took my first step onto the bridge, tears streamed down my face as I thought about how Korea was divided by the US and the former Soviet Union after 35 years of Japanese colonial occupation.”

Returning to the United States however, I found a starkly different reality in the sustained attacks on the peace process—even the very idea of a peace treaty—by right-wing pundits, Neocon hawks, and corporate media promoting an aggressively maximalist standard.Returning to the United States however, I found a starkly different reality in the sustained attacks on the peace process–even the very idea of a peace treaty–by right-wing pundits, Neocon hawks, and corporate media promoting an aggressively maximalist standard. In this dialogue, the 4 million Korean and 35,000 American lives already lost to the Korean War, as well as the 80 million Koreans whose lives would hang in balance in any renewed conflict, are presented as mere footnotes. North Korea in particular, where poverty is rampant and 25% of children suffer from malnutrition, is presented as the perpetually “Threatening Other,” fully deserving to suffer from the US-led sanctions. American exceptionalism is celebrated without reservation.

This disregard for the interests of Koreans themselves in this nominally inter-Korean conflict was a declaration authored by seven leading Democratic Senators, demand that President Trump to hold to a hard line in any negotiations with North Korea. The letter signed by Senators Mendendez, Schumer, Durbin, Warner, Feinstein, Leahy and Brown completely overlooked the recent progress toward peace evinced by the inter-Korean summit and the Panmunjom Declaration, and discounted the overwhelming support for the current peace process by Koreans. Further, it was oblivious to the hopes and interests of 80 million Koreans who, after surviving 35 years of brutal Japanese colonization, were forcibly divided over 65 years ago by the US and the former Soviet Union. The letter offers no alternative vision for peace on the Korean Peninsula and considers Korean interests only insofar as they serve the narrow political agenda of the Democratic party. It represents a bankrupt foreign policy view.

Since when in all history have invaders of this land, or the government of this land supported democracy?

Only for the brief period of WWII where liberal propaganda of democracy was required.

Behind the scenes, secret operations were being planned to destroy our press, bring what was left of the Third Reich into the US in order to plan a base for the rise of the Fourth Reich – and to keep right wing governments in place in nations over which the US had influence and control at the end of WWII. And, rather obviously, those plans have held – have succeeded – and right wing governments have been moved into place and kept in place with US influence and control.


#10

In Love, Peace and Life.
See some of you in D.C., soon.