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Trump Inner-Circle Privately "Appalled" and "Disgusted." Publicly? Dead Silent


#1

Trump Inner-Circle Privately "Appalled" and "Disgusted." Publicly? Dead Silent

Jon Queally, staff writer

If top advisors and others are as angry with President Donald Trump as some reporting indicates, why don't they speak out publicly or resign their posts?


#2

The trouble is, Trump maybe be disgusting - but he is crazy-good for business. The stock market is still going up and up 7 months after January 20.

Recall the same thing happened with Hitler - he was nutty and a little scary - but businessmen in Europe and some in the US loved him! US fascism is even better since it has none of that “socialism” in its philosophy like the German National Socialists did with their generous welfare state (if you were white).


#3

Yes, one must admit that Trump is serving to yield short-term gains (no matter the long-term consequences) to the $tock market. Will his minions know when to quit fishing and cut bait? It’s doubtful. I sure as hell wouldn’t short civil rebellion, thermonuclear war nor climate cataclysm at this time. Smoke 'em if you got 'em.


#4

Republicans are racist.
The War on Drugs is racist.
Free Trade is racist.


#5

Exactly, and all this gets lost in the Trump maelstrom. Trump is the overt manifestation of a decades-long, tacit republican philosophy, which, with a wink and a nod, pursues policies that harm minorities. I still remember Willie Horton, the poster boy for the republican appeal to innate racism. “Personal responsibility” republicans scream, another racial dog whistle to white America that black people have their lazy, good-for-nothing hands in white people’s pockets. Now we’ll see republicans scream their dismay at Trump, but it is for making overt, and shining a spotlight on, racially divisive policies that are best left in the shadows. Paul Ryan won’t say it outright, and he will condemn Trump, but he knows full well the devastating effect his policies would have on minorities and the disadvantaged. It is just not good form to shine a spotlight on such things, and republicans must publicly distance themselves from overt manifestations of their heinous philosophy.


#6

And the MSM almost ignores Pruitt. What a guilty conscience he must have as he works to destroy the world for greed. Whatever his rationalizations for what he is doing, he knows in his heart how wrong it is, and all the bodyguards in the world can’t save him when it’s time to face the consequences. That day will come for him, thus his fear.


#7

Silence is assent.
Full phucking stop.
Given that Twitler’s cabinet is chock full of the most cold blooded swamp creatures ever, no surprise.


#8

Well, let’s see who of Fake President Trump’s coterie has the moral courage to dump him. Critter, as you said, that day will come for all of them.

Fake President bragged, after his main rogue speech, that his winery in Charlottesville is “the biggest in the US.” Well, guess what? This was published on March 21 of this year: Donald Trump incorrectly says Virginia winery is the largest on East Coast http://www.politifact.com/virginia/statements/2016/mar/21/donald-trump/donald-trump-says-virginia-winery-largest-east-coa/

Trump Winery is not even the largest in Virginia. The Trump Winery produces about 36,000 cases of wine each year, according to Boyd. The top producers in the state are the Williamsburg Winery and Chateau Morrisette in Floyd County – each making about 60,000 cases a year, Boyd said. Barboursville Winery in Orange County, meanwhile, makes about 37,000 cases a year, Boyd said.

Maybe with six doses of Viagra, his is the largest in Virginia! But gosh, who cares?


#9

Speaking of silence, not a word from the two Bushes nor Bill Clinton, about any of this sh*t.


#10

The 2 Bushes did reply and came out strongly against bigotry and racism and were critical of Trump’s lukewarm rebuke. To the best of my knowledge, no comments from either Clinton so far.


#11

Just wanted the world to know that my congressman John Faso (NY 19th) remains mum on trump after Charlottesville as he has before about all matters Republican evil and anti-American. Faso is a cowardly partisan hack who rode into office on Mercer (Rebekkka) money who lacks even a shred of decency or honor towards the Constitution he swore to uphold on behalf of his constituents. So when they call the roll of fascist enablers in America’s time of trump, be sure Gutless John Faso, traitor to the United States, along with his Republican colleagues, is named among them. Another clown who avoids town meetings except to appear before those who are selectively admitted.


#12

Yunzer and WiseOwl, for whatever its worth, here are some points to ponder about the stock market under Trump…or any president for that matter:

  1. The stock market’s upswing is nothing new. It is rising now for the same reason it has been rising since 2009, which is that the economy has been sneakily strong. GDP growth hasn’t budged much from its homeostatic 2 percent rate. But unemployment and energy prices are low, and wage growth has been decent for two years.

  2. The stock market might be rising because investors are paying more attention to the people surrounding Trump than to the president, himself. The federal government looks mostly like a conventionally conservative pro-business institution, if you ignore the idiosyncrasies of the Oval Office. Republicans have promised to cut taxes, particularly for rich Americans and business, and there is broad agreement among the GOP to deregulate the financial and energy industries, including rolling back Dodd-Frank.

  3. The president has surrounded himself with Goldman Sachs veterans, including Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and the economic adviser Gary Cohn (not to mention Steve Bannon). Little surprise then that Goldman’s stock is up 43 percent since early November, accounting for about a fifth of the entire increase in the Dow Jones average.

  4. Although U.S. presidents often take credit and blame for the economies that they oversee, they don’t have much direct control over the economy. Macroeconomic conditions and global energy markets are mostly outside of their purview.

Cheers.


#13

Greetings and solidarity from the 18th Shandaken…


#14

And a shoutout to you in return, neighbor. Sick 'em.


#15

Oops. Make that Sic 'em.


#16

Members of the world of politics are like cops, they have a code of silence. Those who know crimes are being committed and keep quiet are as much a part of the problem as those who actually commit the crimes.


#17

I have to believe those that haven’t spoken out publicly are either cowards or more likely, are closet racists themselves.
Despicable jerks to say the least.


#18

Appalled and disgusted? - Gimme a break!

If they really were that, these pigs would quit feeding on the slops from the presidential trough.
These people are without a shred of morality. How can they face their families, their children and grandchildren at home?

How long is this scum prepared to lick Trump’s disgusting spittle?


#19

It’s unfortunate that Common Dreams didn’t do more homework about Cohn, his role and the influence of actions by someone like him can have on the market. His position is actually quite similar to Janet Yellen’s on the Fed. Markets keep their eye on certain individuals, and their actions are viewed as signals regarding the economy; Cohn is one of those individuals, and he’s currently between a rock and a hard place. It’s easy to assume the moral position is to resign, but there’s also the moral responsibility attached to the effect that would have on the market - which, as this article fails to point out, effects not just big investors on Wall Street but ordinary people who’s retirement funds are part of the market. Cohn resigning could signal to the Market that things aren’t stable causing the Market to plummet, and taking with it investements like retirement funds of ordinary people with it. There’s no doubt Cohn finds being part of Trump’s team repugnant, but, believe it or not, he has to weigh that against the greater responsibility of trying to keep markets stable in the midst of political chaos.


#20

Oh those Bushes; such paragons of morality…when it’s easy.