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Trump Quietly Inks Deal Selling Out Americans to Telecom Industry


#1

Trump Quietly Inks Deal Selling Out Americans to Telecom Industry

Lauren McCauley, staff writer

Without fanfare or cameras, President Donald Trump on Monday quietly signed away Americans' right to internet privacy, inking a deal that will allow internet companies to track and sell private information without user consent.


#2

There is one good thing about this.

It will force the open software development of secure sessions, personal vpn
for every program. And no not https, which any gov/civilian/corp entity can hack.

Ultimately there will be cloud anonymous servers servicing unprofileable sessions
with encryption based upon some form of biometric algorithm in packets so
fragile that any redirect will leave a quantum state change fracturing the data pack and destroying the data

We once did triple nesting with entrust email and that packet proved unbreakable no
matter how long you hacked it. Nested encryption is pretty good.

But when NSA et'al request competition to make the new md5 md6 hashes, what they are really saying is send us your code so we can beta test our hacks.

So in the end we protect ourselves with continued open source development
Free Thinkers will prevail the darkness.

One last series.

If Amazon is the CIA's server farm (and they are)
Then Microsoft is their preferred open door OS
and Google is their search algorithm developer.
(I never trusted them too much like Bechtel)

PS If you don't think Russia is hacking, you're not in IT security.
What do you think retiring KGB does.
Everyone hacks from China to Finland to England to Germany.

But of course they don't do anything with their results...lol


#3

Obvious response: Cancel any services that you can--cable, Internet, phone, cellphone. These companies need your payments to exist.

But we all know that Americans would rather have their entertainment than protecting their privacy.


#4

Had enough yet, Murica?


#5

So basically you are okay with this, is what you are saying.

It is obviously important that you, via the service you pay for through your ISP, tell us all that this action by Congress and Trump is justified because people like you use the internets after all.

Your comment, via the internet, according to you, amounts to a vote FOR this. Or, perhaps you have some time left on your service prior to cancellation date.

Cancelled your phone yet?

Didn't think so.

Why not just cut to the chase and tell us all you are FOR this.

I mean, we all asked for this and deserve it right?


#6

You make a lot of assumptions. Many of them are incorrect.

Whether or not I'm OK with it, which I'm not, has very little to do with my comment. I recommend not paying for services. But, perhaps that argument is too subtle for you. so try...

Stop giving them your money! That's your key tool to protest.


#7

The solution that fits my needs (as much as possible, anyway) is only using....

TOR web browser,
NordVPN (the best VPN for TOR),
ProtonMail (encrypted email) for communicating anything that is remotely private, and
FileLock for locking and/or encrypting personal files on my computer.

I've been using this complete system for a week and a half now and I'm happy with the results. It's time-consuming in setting it all up and it require a few extra seconds when working with personal files.

The downside is that streaming video doesn't work real well most of the time. I fine with that.


#8

Interesting...T-dump authorizes internet providers access to private, personal, business account information to use at their discretion yet cries "foul" while alleging that communications in T-Dump Tower were co-opted by President Obama. Hey, right hand, Look..."I'm WATCHING YOU and know your every move."


#9

Well, Face Book, Google, and other web companies were not covered by those restrictions which would not have come into effect until Dec 2017 anyways. You never had any privacy so nothing lost really


#10

Rolson, thank you for that fine, uplifting comment. While using the oppressor's tools, we out flank him with our broad front of open source knowledge and adaptability. The modern tools are incompatible with restrictive private interests. Quoting from an anonymous blogger, "It cannot be the ultimate authority if it is in the private interest."


#11

I was happy that Trump won the election. His victory ensures that U.S. capitalism isn't going to be tainted with a bunch of liberal hiberty-giberty. I hoped it would be a government of money-slinging, big-time corporate-interest lieutenants running the country the way business oughta be. Capitalism: free, clean and clear of liberal interference. The last few decades have witnessed the slow, steady gain of corporate control by privatization over large aspects of society. Now they finally have it, free and clear control of government. In a step to consolidate control, the government of free enterprise has declared that it will buy from any seller, the personal data of internet users. Gotta hand it to them tho'. Pretty darn clever to create more GDP by allowing private services to investigate the public, at the public's expense no less! Yay, Donald! Show us how good capitalism is!


#12

Actually I'm not stupid enough to fall for your not so subtle apologetics for Trump.

And you will be pleased to know the two so far that liked your comment are cancelling their phone and internet services, and with you so far that is 3 people on one forum!


#13

Check out the Republican "brain trust" that my state Alaska has going for it-
You can't make this shit up!
Here we have Don Young- voted the most or one of the most corrupt Representatives in Washington-
Lisa Murkowski and Mr. Sullivan-All 3 Repubicans:

"All three members of the delegation — Sens. Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan and Rep. Don Young — are Republicans and voted with their party to pass a Congressional Review Act resolution to overturn a Federal Communications Commission regulation issued at the tail end of the Obama administration in October 2016.
Murkowski, Sullivan and Young for the most part said that their concerns about piecemeal regulations outweighed their desire to protect individuals' data.
"So we looked at this one very carefully. Where I came down on it at the end was: What this rule did was it set up basically two standards depending on what the platform was. And that made no sense," Murkowski said after voting in favor of repealing the FCC rule. "It would have created confusion."
Asked about his vote on Thursday, Young was brief: "They asked me for my vote," he said in explanation of his "yes" vote on the CRA resolution. "They," he clarified, meant Republican leadership.
"That's it," he said.
Sullivan said he had looked into privacy concerns, and "thought that it still covered the importance of privacy issues but also letting the ability of that important sector of the economy grow and have opportunity. So I thought the balance was good."
Murkowski said she struggled with deciding how to vote on revoking the rule, because privacy concerns are common among Alaskans".


* Please go to this ADN News site and check it out- And please read the comments for A good laugh at Alaska Republicans and the good people of Alaska that can't quite believe their ears and eyes....


#14

No, I am NOT cancelling my phone or internet service-
You don't speak for me or anyone else on this forum!!!
I believe that you, like A certain MR. Yunzer, go too far out of your way to be argumentative-


#15

While it is true that DT's self concern and hypocrisy is highlighted by this signing it really changes nothing but the ability for the providers to charge money for information and tracking. In essence it makes what hackers steal available for sale. Anyone who posts anything of personal concern on the internet, even with a long trusted friend, is a fool. The internet has never been safe and as long as people crave money and easy ways to get it this will continue.
Imagine the silliness of a person on a busy pedestrian walkway building a house made of glass then trying to stop people from looking in. The net is what it is, get over it and stop whining about what it isn't and never has been, secure.


#16

Oh spare me.

I'm no more argumentative than what has been the norm on this forum for years. I'm no more argumentative than YOU.

Where have I asserted that I speak for anyone? I was making a rhetorical argument against the notion that the onus is on the masses for the unconstitutional acts being perpetrated against them, against all of us.


#17

Imagine the silliness of a person on a busy pedestrian walkway building a house made of glass then trying to stop people from looking in. The net is what it is, get over it and stop whining about what it isn't and never has been, secure.

Please post your passwords in line with the glass house internet argument.

I mean, there is no expectation whatsoever of privacy right? Can we read your emails?

Nothing of personal concern? Then I'd like to read them for fun.

Also I want to see your browser history. No concern for you, so okay, I'd like to look at it.

Thanks.

Please note. This is NOT a personal attack, any more than your kindly advice directed at others contained in your quote.


#18

Thank you for your response. Nowhere did I infer that building such a house was a good idea but the reality is that we all live in one. And yes, if you care to read my E-mail and my browsing history is there somewhere for anyone to see that has the ability and the time to waste.
My point is that anyone with the modicum of ability to learn to hack the internet can find out what I am doing on the web. This is not a secret. I do no online banking, use online purchasing as a last resort, and refrain from making online statements that I wouldn't want my neighbors, a pretty well mixed group, to know that I wrote. That said, I do not feel that this transparency is a good thing anymore then I am pleased by the corruption of out government by a absolutely rotten campaign financing system. I feel that this is a excellent example of corporate power and over-reach caused by the corruption of this deregulated system. But I have given up howling at every moon and tend to concentrate on the ones that really are a major threat like income disparity, campaign financing, and the selling of the commons to the largest contributor. Climate change is something that I believe will, in the not too distant future, be the most important event our civilization has ever faced and we are effectually doing nothing to mitigate its destruction.


#19

But I have given up howling at every moon and tend to concentrate on the ones that really are a major threat like income disparity, campaign financing, and the selling of the commons to the largest contributor. Climate change is something that I believe will, in the not too distant future, be the most important event our civilization has ever faced and we are effectually doing nothing to mitigate its destruction.

On every single one of those points, deregulation such as this only advances the corporate power driving those outcomes.

I hope you don't mind me continuing to howl with millions of others on behalf of those not willing to concede such power.

This kind of power is codifying a massive and potent nexus of Corporate State power. The real danger lies in systematic codification of awesome Corporate State power that could be used against individuals, and groups fighting those very battles you rightly assert as necessary.

Probably most of the individuals involved in those political movements against war, inequality, and deregulation of Big Energy have personal internet artifacts not that interesting to that emergent Corporate State power. Their political activities and alliances? That is a whole different matter and the crux of my argument.

A major component of this is Codification of a full frontal assault on net neutrality, as this opens the door to truncating the net as per whatever algorithm deemed necessary to further advance that corporate interest.

The increased potential of power to negatively affect directly political groups' ability to inform themselves, others, and to organize is what I see as the main issue of importance.