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Trump’s Support and Praise of Despots Is Central to the U.S. Tradition, Not a Deviation From It


#1

Trump’s Support and Praise of Despots Is Central to the U.S. Tradition, Not a Deviation From It

Glenn Greenwald

Since at least the end of World War II, supporting the world’s worst despots has been a central plank of U.S. foreign policy, arguably its defining attribute. The list of U.S.-supported tyrants is too long to count, but the strategic rationale has been consistent: In a world where anti-American sentiment is prevalent, democracy often produces leaders who impede rather than serve U.S. interests.


#2

It's well worth it to read the entire piece, linked to The Intercept.

Glenn pulls the curtain away, in no uncertain terms, from the Corporate Media's misdirection, and lies, concerning US Foreign Policy supporting Tyrants, as they claim, now, that it is all just starting under Trump.

This also should warn us that when the "extrajudicial" killing of protesters begins here, it is only an extension, and the logical conclusion, of long entrenched US Policy, only now come home to roost.


#3

And this empire building tradition also means that when this country does take a stand for "humanitarian" reasons, it's often to bomb other countries and/or justify regime change. Have to make it look good for the folks back home.


#4

This issue is only being raised because Trump's in the WH. If Obama were still there, mum's the word. So transparent!


#5

Exhibit A: Every US POTUS from Saint Ron through Obama has tapped Henry Kissinger as an "advisor".


#6

Coyote, If, and when, the 'extrajudicial' killings of protesters begins here, the War against the Establishment will begin in America, and not stop until either we prevail and return morality and equality to our government, or they kill enough of us to create a constant fear of death for those that remain.

America's first principles were the foundation of Freedom and Liberty. Take them away, and the bloodshed will begin.

I really don't believe it will come to this in this country. Those who would be responsible for enforcement of the establishments hatred, would be wreaking havoc on their own friends and families, all innocent men, women and children in pursuit of nothing more than, freedom.

If I'm wrong, I'll be one of the first in line.

"Give me liberty, or give me death."~Patrick Henry


#7

Naturally, war criminals always support other war criminals!
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#8

Not true!


#9

The U.S. has always been "afraid of a good example" set by democratically elected leaders at the head of popular movements for economic reforms that threaten rapacious wealth extraction by transnational corporations.


#10

There is a big difference. The US has been hypocritical, supporting democracy and human rights here and abroad, but also supporting some dictators. But Trump actually believes in what these dictators are doing and is an opponent of democracy and human rights. Greenwald is blurring things here. Trump is not acting in the US tradition. This is all new and a complete break from the past. Not recognizing that can only help Trump.


#11

The U.S. has always been "afraid of a good example" set by democratically elected leaders at the head of popular movements for economic reforms that threaten rapacious wealth extraction by transnational corporations. I vividly recall in 1997 when I first discovered this historical reality. I was temping as the administrator for a college history department, and my roommate was pursuing a master's of education and planning a related trip to Guatemala. She had a numerous books about that country laying around, which led me to discover the U.S. overthrow in 1953 of President Jacobo Arbenz by the Allan and John Dulles (CIA and State Dept.) at the behest of then United Fruit Co., now Chiquita, whose days turning Guatemalans into wage slaves on their own land were numbered with Arbenz' plan to reclaim Guatemalan lands for Guatemalans' commonwealth. I was shocked. I marched into the history department the next day and asked an American history professor if what I'd discovered was true. He laughed knowingly and said go down the hall and ask Prof. So and So if he teaches that in his "America since 1945" class. I didn't need, I got both of my answers already in that moment. I've since read for years about the seemingly endless similar instances of U.S. overthrow of democratically elected leaders put into office by mass movements for economic reforms that threaten the previously existing colonial wealth extraction regimes. In fact, you the CIA's own memo(s) about the 'playbook' for such schemes have been recently declassified. Such schemes have been deeply held U.S. foreign policy for decades and decades. President Mossadegh of Iran in 1953 was overthrown by Eisenhower and the CIA at the behest of Churchill and British Petroleum when Mossadegh moved to nationalize Iranian oil production. I recall reading from Marine Major General Smedley Butler how, in the first quarter of the 20th c., he and his forces walked into and disbanded a Haitian parliament that was set to vote in favor of a national constitution prohibiting a certain percentage of the sale of land to foreign entities. The list goes on and on. Of course, the Cold War is the real hay day, when post-colonial national independence movements were, to a one, smeared as "international communist conspiracies" as cover for covert and overt wars to remove popular leaders. Castro, who many Americans love to hate but who seem to forget only invited Soviet nuclear missiles in exchange for economic and arms support after the U.S. attempted overthrow known as "Bay of Pigs"; but almost none of them will know who Bautista was, and almost all of them will say Castro was a monster, somehow forgetting that in war, atrocities are committed on both sides, and better to look at whose side is right in the first place, the local independence movement, or the foreign invader? Anyway...


#12

I defy anyone to give an example of when the US has ever overthrown a dictator and installed a democracy. But hey, we're the beacon of democracy (sort of like the pirates who would lure ships onto the rocks with bonfires).


#13

We have ALWAYS played nice with dictators as long as it was in our perceived interest to do so. Trump is different. He does not play nice for policy reasons, but because he is a fawning infant who is both awed and cowed by power. His body-image handlers have apparently done some work. Trump's body language when in the presence of world leaders has always seemed to me to be revealing subservience. With Merkel he looked positively cowed, head down and hands tightly clasped between his knees. More recently, he has looked somewhat grim and determined, as if someone told him to practice looking more like an adult when in the presence of a dictator. It is almost sad to see this dismal, way-out-of-his league ignoramous try to act like an adult. That such a buffoon is the president is horrifying. Time to water my plants with Brawndo.


#14

Mum's the word from whom?


#15

He's been OhBummer since 2010-11 around our house. And, part of that one word critique is his foreign policy. Which Mr. Greenwald, and so many other journalists and historians, have written and spoken about.
There's a series of political corrections that would change our country's trajectory in the world, but are currently blocked by both parties. That's why The UniParty runs the country and why Kissinger is still considered a great statesman by all who seek the Presidency. He's the consensus, go to mass murderer and genocidal maniac, that The UniParty has embraced.
Why that's the situation is clouded by the propaganda, misdirection and agitprop of the MSM and the Federal government agencies who run the DoD and State Dept., et al. They agree, pretty much.
When the Vietnam War ended badly, exposing the supposed invincibility of the U.S., The UniParty said never again. And, the MSM went along with entire program. Making money for their owners became the primary objective. Nothing much has changed, no matter who's POTUS. And, as a concerned citizen watchiing this for over 50 years, it can be very disheartening because it's a short-term strategy that will end in long-term disasters. And, many Americans are resigned to this Unhappy Ending, unfortunately. Mostly because there's no politician willing to point out the fallacy of a ( totally corrupted ) American Exceptionalism.


#16

Probably best not to quote that slave-holding hypocrite if you really mean it about liberty...


#17

You must not listen to real progressives then. Many decry Obama's drone war and support for countries like the saudis.


#18

When the Monroe doctrine was advanced, it was understood that only the US could interfere with those countries. After the spanish-american war the US went full throated towards putting dictators into power and helping them stay in power. This went from Cuba thru the caribbean to all of south america, hawaii and the philippines. Then onto asia and the middle east.
Countries that had democratic elections had their governments overthrown with dictator puppets put into place. The Iranians had an election and we overthrew the elected government and installed the shah of iran, a vicious dictator. we put Saddam into power and ignored the mass murder of 100K Iraqis, some with chemical weapons the US provided both the expertise, the equipment, and the raw materials to make them.
The US has rarely ever allowed democracy in any country they have business. It is surprising to me that they let germany, italy, and japan have democracy, esp japan given our history in asia.


#19

Yes, TRUE Progressives did that. I was referring to Obama's Liberal Democratic supporters. They were woefully silent while he continued the US' plan to destroy the Mid East. Quite shameful.


#20

See my response to SkipMoreland.