Home | About | Donate

Trump Trade Policies and Mishandling of Coronavirus Pandemic Have 'Wiped Out' US Manufacturing Jobs: Economist

Originally published at http://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/08/10/trump-trade-policies-and-mishandling-coronavirus-pandemic-have-wiped-out-us

I would hope that if the democrats are fortunate enough to hold the house, senate, and White House they will go the full monty. Change the face of America in radical ways.

1 Like

The pandemic revealed how dangerous it is to offshore vital health products necessary in emergency situations or, really, any situation because you never know when a shortage of essential products will occur. Translate that broadly to many products we depend on—food, pharmaceuticals, electronics—we could revitalize our economy if we have the will. What is wrong with the thinkers and leaders of this country?

1 Like

The flying pigs will bring us that news I’m sure.

2 Likes

Well, that’s the easy part: They are all psychopathic greedheads in the grip of wetiko. But the decision not to maintain more than a few nanoseconds worth of inventory of anything (“Just-In-Time” logistics) originated in the Japanese auto industry in the 1960s. It was followed by the elimination of margins for error in every nook and cranny of the economy. in the name of “efficiency.” Really? It is “economically efficient” to stop a million dollar a day process for a whole day for lack of a replacement spare for a ten dollar gasket? Yes, it’s an exaggeration, but not by much.

5 Likes

Then we really deserve what we get, don’t we?

Federal government war department spending for physical manufacture and the assembly and sheet metal forming for automotive are the two big areas left within USA 50 states.

We are not training new machinists, welders, inspectors, electricians, mechanics.
Heck, let’s get to it.
When the skills are available and ready to go = some one will open a new shop.
Two years ago, a company opened a shop two blocks from a college campus because they
wanted to hire inteligent, hard working - and they did.

I have a medicine made in south carolina, east of Jackson. And the owner hires teachers for a partial second shift. This provides her top notch employees AND permits the teachers to remain in their class rooms with students. They could come to chicago and have an audi or cadillac like i witness at our local grade school.

I now view Trump as Satanic filth with putrification running out of every orifice in his body. Like the heroes in Stephen King’s, “It”, it is only through standing firm and not backing down from the monster that he will be destroyed.

3 Likes

I don’t know if it’s completely accurate to blame trade agreements for the loss of American manufacturing jobs because it’s awfully expensive for certain types of businesses to thrive here in the US, and adding tariffs to that just makes it more expensive. All a tariff is is an extra tax that gets imposed on imported goods that has to be absorbed by the supply or manufacturing chain or passed on to the consumer. The latter is hard to do since Americans like cheap stuff.

I’ve read that trump’s tariffs have cost way more American jobs than they have created, plus they have driven up the cost of certain goods not to mention damaged other industries such as farming from the retaliatory tariffs China imposed on American ag products. I can believe it because in the small business I run I have been having to pay tariffs on things that I never did before trump started his trade war with China, and it’s frustrating having to deal with that extra cost I have to pay. Also, thanks to these tariffs I can no longer get certain supplies and have to substitute much more expensive ones in their place. Virtually none of the things I need are made in the US and I doubt ever will be.

I wish people would get it thru their heads here that there is a huge cost to imposing tariffs on other countries’ goods, and it certainly isn’t paid by the country whose goods the tariffs are being imposed on.

1 Like

Which “we”? Humankind? The US public? People who are born into a capitalist society (bastard Latin, = “money worship”)?

You might find Paul Levy’s analysis of “wetiko” interesting.

“Hope” is just another word for magical thinking.

We should be half as smart as squirrels. Much of the “inventory” they bury for winter ends up replenishing entire forests.

Yes, “Mother Nature” is often criticized as being “profligate” in producing many more bits of organic matter than survive to reproduce. But she functions as a closed system, with every bit recycled, and she has been successful at it for almost 4 billion years. Our genus (Homo) has been around for a mere 2 million, and our species, which a friend with a degree in Human Ecology from the College of the Atlantic refers to as “Homo sap”, just 200,000. Kurt Vonnegut imagined (in Galapagos) that the Big Brain Experiment turned out to be a failure.

1 Like

I’m afraid this is the wrong way to think about it. When you allow a company to go to Thailand or Bangladesh and pay poverty wages you create the illusion that it’s too expensive to manufacture in the US. If our trade agreements required wages that deliver comparable living standards for their workers, no matter their location, you bring labor to parity across international borders. But that’s not what our trade agreements do. Instead, they allow companies to engage in inhuman labor practices under the guise of “efficiency”— a false standard when you add back the human suffering involved.

1 Like