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US Special Forces in Combat: Nothing New for Iraq and Syria?


#1


#2

Lacking "insurgents", the US grew bored with the moon.


#3

Profit is the motive; corruption and poverty are the tools. War is franchised in much the same way as Walmart, Starbucks and MacDonalds. Perpetual conflict results in perpetual profits. Endlessly analyzing strategic minutiae misses the point.


#4

I think that is too easy to say and not nearly as factual as you suppose. While the sale of weapons is the motive, ideology is the tool. It was ideology that fueled the cold war and the cold war produced this well armed world. Weaponry development and sale is the big business. Human nature (i.e. When you are promoted from being a sergeant to the president or commander of a heavily armed faction, since you have the weapons there is always the tendency to use them.) Weapons seem to breed more weapons... bigger weapons too! The ability to wage war starts wars.

You say profit is the motive for war. Indeed for a few, wars can be profitable but let's not forget that making weapons during peace time was profitable too.

You got a gun so he gets a gun. You got a bigger one so he got a bigger one. You got some guns for your friends and then so did he. He's got a what? A tank! Well you'll get three! Until one day you've got an army and he's got an army and armies are good for one thing only.

Well why not? You've got the weapons for it?

The profits were made in the build up to war. Wars just get in the way of transport and delivery schedules on the next new shipment of weapons.


#5

It's fantasy to suppose that the U.S.'s interventions have enabled us to "control" events in the Middle East. It's time we acknowledged that our actions and initiatives have made a mess of it. We're resented. We continue to make more enemies than friends. "Don't just do something . . . stand there" would seem to be the wiser approach.