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Using Momentum to Build a Stronger Movement


#1

Using Momentum to Build a Stronger Movement

George Lakey

We always looked forward to the annual visit of Saul Alinsky when I taught at a small graduate school. Alinsky was the terror of city hall bosses everywhere, and he told us colorful stories from his organizing experience. Ours was the Martin Luther King School of Social Change. The students could earn an M. A. in Social Change, which, when asked, I would explain stood for “Master’s in Agitation.”


#2

When I read the title I thought Lakey would refer to the momentum that Bernie has been generating as the start of a movement, but there is no mention of Bernie in the article.

Bernie's momentum is unlike anything mentioned in the article.

Given today's politics, to expect a movement without a political party to be effective is a fantasy.

Bernie could use his growing popularity (momentum) by forgetting about winning the presidency, abandoning the Democrats, and associating with an established party of the left, to extend his revolution and build the chosen party.

That could change the US political landscape in the near future by building a viable 3rd party that destroys the locked-down "two" party system.

Given his popularity among sensible people, Bernie is presently very well situated to realistically do this.


#3

I thought it would at least mention Bernie, too, since he's building the biggest movement that we've seen in ages. Gosh, he won Oklahoma, of all places!

Talk about respecting the laborer while pushing for dramatic change that will benefit the laborer--Bernie's got it in spades.

It ain't anywhere near over yet. Go Bernie. Go people tuning in to the movement to take back our country, our world.


#5

A critical skill is the ability to step out of our comforting cocoon of moral certitude to try to envision how others view our actions, in order to be able to explain clearly just why we're doing them

(As well as the necessity to provide that explanation).

You can preach to the choir

But you're unlikely to enlarge it