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Warmer Winters Slow the Growth of Forest Giants


#1


#2

I hate to pick, but as a scientist I feel I must.

"Bumblebees need long tongues to reach deep into the flower tubes of the plants they favour. But warmer summers have meant that the flowers they favour most in the Rocky Mountains have become less frequent, and pollinators that once specialised have now become generalist foragers, grabbing honey where they can."

Bees make honey, they don't grab it.


#3

You love being first all the time which says something about your vanity and sense of community but when you do something like this ... it is only ego and though technically correct, in this particular case, your being first just to be first is pointless. You didn't even comment on the point of the article. Some scientist you are?

When you don't really have something to add to the conversation you might try letting others who do start the conversation.


#4

Do you really think that a serious conversation can be based upon ignorance of "grabbing" versus producing honey--an elementary school concept--is tractable? This "faux pas" (benefit of the doubt) is not to be taken lightly--The Enlightenment is at risk.


#5

I think the author of the article misused his language (although the intent was clear enough nonetheless) but he was not what was being reported on in the article but the scientific findings reported in the journal Nature and elsewhere were.

While you could have mentioned this minor error in passing, you did not address anything of importance cited in the article about the effects warmer winters were having on flora and fauna.

This minor mistake is not to be taken lightly, you say? You are joking right? The article scientific points were totally ignored by you. Totally!

This makes your comment absurd to the point of being Monty Pythonesque where someone focuses on a minor error and makes a big deal about it while completely ignoring the main points of the article.


#6

Having worked in ecohydrology throughout my career, including climate-related predictions of frost-line migration, ecotone expansion and contraction, drought and flood issues, and the like, I'm all on board with the science. My point is that in making such a simple error about the bees enables the Dark Forces to torpedo the whole shebang as they have been known to do.

My admittedly obliquely stated point was really that the article needed editing. A colleague would have picked up on the bee issue and suggested a rewrite. Loss of editorial rigor is taking a serious toll on published works.


#7

Yeah okay sure. You didn't comment on the points of the article even once. Now you try to make such petty and silly focus on a minor mistake (it was obvious what was meant btw) as if you are scientifically rigorous... lol. Yeah okay... and you hurried to be first with this wisdom for all our benefit too. Had you at least commented on something scientific and added to the conversation then adding this criticism in passing might have been justifiable but instead you presented yourself like a school kid looking for attention or a Monty Pythonesque caricature of scientific discussion.

As far as the dark forces (such drama) torpedoing anything, what about the fact that you completely ignored the import of the article. A serious subject and you concentrate on a schoolchild's correction because the teacher said honey instead of nectar. But you did get to be first to do so... that seems most important to you as we constantly see.


#8

OK SR, whatever you say.


#9

Don't be cranky.


#10

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#11

Haven't had this much fun since junior high!


#12

Not mentioned is the loss of worldwide forests due to hihj lrvels of Aluminum, etc in ground, weakening trees that then succumed to insects;metals are raining down from manmade cirrus clouds. Geoengineeringwatch. com